Irish Identity and Religious Diversity

In: Religion Topics

Submitted By jlmk
Words 1929
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INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY:
Assignment Submission Form

Student Name: | Jessica McKeon |
Student ID Number: | 12302812 |
Programme Title: | Business, Economic and Social Studies |
Module Title: | Introduction to Sociology |
Assessment Title: | To what extent does the new religious diversity in Ireland challenge traditional definitions of Irish national identity? |
Lecturer(s): | Daniel FaasAnna Siuda (TA) |
Date Submitted: | 13/12/12 |

I have read and I understand the plagiarism provisions contained in the General Regulations of the University Calendar found at:
http://www.tcd.ie/calendar/assets/pdf/tcd-calendar-h-regulations.pdf
I declare that the assignment being submitted represents my own work and has not been taken from the work of others save where appropriately referenced in the body of the assignment.

Signed Date:

This essay explores the extent to which new religious diversity in Ireland challenges traditional definitions of Irish national identity. National identity can be defined as the cultural outcome of a discourse of the nation. This concept of national identity exists for a number of reasons. It gives us a sense of collective belonging, it decides who should be allowed become a full citizen of the nation, and it influences the goals of a nation that are thought to be in the collective social interest (O’Mahony et al, 2001). Irish national identity used to depend on Catholicism. Although predominantly Roman Catholic, Ireland today is a multi-cultural society where all religions are embraced and respected as playing vital roles in the societal make-up of the country (educationireland.ie). The first impression when religious beliefs and practice in Ireland are compared with those in Europe as a whole is that Ireland remains an outstandingly Catholic country (Fogarty et al, 1984). While it is true that the vast majority…...

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