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It Takes a Nation of Millions

In: Social Issues

Submitted By carlyoung70
Words 19872
Pages 80
It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back: The War on Drugs, Mass Incarceration, and a Call to Action for America's Black Youth
By
Carl L. Young

An Alternative Plan Paper Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the
Degree Master of Science
In
Sociology: Corrections

Minnesota State University, Mankato
Mankato, Minnesota
Spring 2013
Final Draft 4/20/2013

1

This Alternative Plan Paper has been examined and approved by the following members of the Examining Committee.

_____________________
Dr. Leah Rogne, Advisor
_____________________
Dr. William Wagner
_____________________
Dr. Penny Jo Rosenthal
_____________________
Dr. Nadarajan Sethuraju

________________
Date

2

Abstract
This alternative plan paper examines the circumstances that have evolved as a result of the Reagan Administration’s War on Drugs and the increase of mass incarceration of the Black community. In the last thirty years, the federal government of the United States of America has engaged in campaign known as the “War on Drugs,” which has involved a variety of policies to stop the production, distribution and sale of illegal narcotics. Hundreds of billions of dollars have been spent in a war that has targeted the most vulnerable in our society, impacting its youth for generations to come.
This alternative plan paper addresses the impact of the War on Drugs and the criminal justice policies that have impacted the life chances of Black youth nationwide and calls for a new social movement, introducing a 21st century Black Youth Manifesto to ask the youth of the Black community to pick up where previous social movements left off and take back their communities, their families, and reclaim their hope for the future.

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Table of Contents
Abstract . . . .
Chapter One: Introduction
 My Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
 Strain and...

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