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Jainism and Sikhism

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Jainism vs. Sikhism

Part I

Read the assigned chapters for the week and complete the following table. Be as specific as possible when identifying practices, beliefs, rituals, and historical elements. Cite sources in APA formatting.

|Core Beliefs |Jainism |Sikhism |
| |1.Belief in no violence |1.Belief in self defense |
| |2.Vegeterian as an expression of their faith |2.Express Faith by praying daily prayers and singing Guru’s |
| | |hymns |
| |3.Truth; honesty |3.Belief in one creator |
| |4.Natural focus in motion is seen at the Universe |4.Belief to do good onto others |
| |5.Karma |5.Karma |

Part 2

Respond to the following questions in 150 to 200 words:

1. What do you think is the most important similarity and which is the most important difference? Use specifics to support your answer.

Both religions have similiarities and differences, the common one they share is the belief of reincarnation. Reincarnation is the belief of life after death. The solely meaning that life does exist to those who believe in it, is a very similar belief they have in common. The difference they have can be means of survival, diet, and different concept in...

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