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James B Watson(Father of Behaviorism

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JOHN B. WATSON
(1878-1958)

“Father of Behaviorism”

Brenda Anyanwu
Paul D. Camp Community College

Mrs. Jean Farmer
Psychology 201

Abstract

Based on a quote from John B. Watson, “Psychology as the behaviorist views it is a purely objective experimental branch of natural science. Its theoretical goal is the prediction and control of behavior. Introspection forms no essential part of its methods, nor is the scientific value of its data dependent upon the readiness with which they lend themselves to interpretation in terms of consciousness. The behaviorist, in his efforts to get a unitary scheme of animal response, recognizes no dividing line between man and brute. The behavior of man, with all of its refinement and complexity, forms only a part of the behaviorist’s total scheme of investigation. (Classics in the History of Psychology) Although, I might not somewhat agree with his theory, Mr. Watson holds some truth about his view on his theory. What you are about to read is about his life and what lead him to his theory on behaviorism.

Brenda Anyanwu
Mrs. Jean Farmer
Psychology 52A
November 3, 2010
Project Assignment
John Broadus Watson
(1878-1958)
“Father of Behaviorism”

During the year of 1878, John B. Watson was born to parents Pickens and Emma Watson, he was their fourth child. Growing upon a farm in a small town of Travelers Rest, South Carolina the family was poor. Most of the family wealth had been too lost during the civil war. John’s parent both had different ideas of how to live and raise children. John’s mother, Emma, was beautiful but very religious, strong, and intelligent. Whereas, John’s father, Pickens was handsome, however, mostly drank liqueur, and had extra-marital affairs. The environment that John was raised in was the beginning of his theory on how children should be raised.
While Pickens Watson spent most of his...

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