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Jeremy Bentham Biography

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Name: Professor: Class: Business Ethics March 30, Jeremy Bentham Short Biography The famous philosopher and political annalist Jeremy Bentham was born into a family of attorneys, eventually following into their footsteps and studying law. While he never pursued his learned trade, he focused his interest onto analyzing and reconstructing English law. This passion allowed him to simplify the existing laws reducing them to a simple cause and effect theory. The utilitarian model was later used as a baseline to change and develop new measures by the judicial as well as the business sector. “Jeremy Bentham was born into a family of lawyers on February 15th 1784 in Houndsditch, London” (Jeremy Bentham Facts ). The wonder child entered Oxford College at the tender age of twelve, after which, he followed in his father’s footsteps “enrolling into Lincoln`s Inn graduating from law school in 1963” (Sweet). According to the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy web page, the era of his upbringing was paved by changes in the social fabric as well as moral structure of society. (Sweet) This experience empowered him to pursue a career as a writer, philosopher and analyst rather than pursuing a career as a lawyer. Jeremy Bentham spent most of his life critiquing as well as developing different theories to try to improve the law system of his time. He later explained his dislike for practicing his learned trade as a direct result of his education. “…mendacity and insincerity … are the only sure effects of an English university education," (Jeremy Bentham Facts ) His father’s death and his newly found wealth allowed Jeremy Bentham to retreat from his social life to pursue his analytical and philosophical passion. The result of his relentless work were numerous manuscripts in the fields of law and business. One of his most famous books is “Introduction to the...

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