Jeremy Bentham

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This paper will examine the life of Jeremy Bentham and his accomplishments throughout his life. Special attention will be placed on his contribution to the study of ethics. Jeremy Bentham was born on The 15th of February, 1748 in Spitalfields, London, England At the early age of 3 years he started learning Latin and two years later he started playing the violin. Jeremy gained his BA in 1763 from the Queens College, Oxford University; three years in 1766 he attained his MA from the same institution. He was a theorist in Anglo- American philosophy of law, his opposition to the political powers of his day aided in his development and thinking, his ideas stimulated the growth of “welfarism”. He also pushed for the recognition of individualism and economic independence. He however did not stop there; his fight for equal rights continued and included the freedom of expression, women’s rights and the decriminalization of homosexuality. He also argued that the church and the state should be separated and also took a strong stance in the call for the abolition of slavery and the death penalty. He utilized many avenues to get his point across to the politicians.
In 1777 his first book, Introduction to The Principles for Morals and Legislation was published ant it brought him instant fame. This book was written to support a proposal made by Jeremy on the penal code. It was supposed to be the instrument of change and was being pushed by Jeremy and his friends. It was however turned down by the Troy Government, although significantly disappointed Jeremy did not give up. He realized that it will take more than just paintings or books to instantly change society’s way of thinking, so he joined forces with his friends to form a political movement which was the birth the Utilitarianism. The political party’s initial name was the "Philosophical Radicals", which was soon changed to…...

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