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Jim Crow

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What were the major cause and consequences of the populist movement of the 1880’s and 1890’s?
The populist movement was a number of initiatives that began in response to the sentiment of society. The Populist Party is also call the People’s Party and the populist movement was the first important movement by citizens against what they believed was the corruption and the greed of our government. One of the causes was the Homestead Act which brought many new farmers to the West after the Civil War. Farmers then purchased the new farming machinery on credit in order to expand and produce more. The next cause of the populist movement was economic recession. The weather wasn’t cooperating with the farmers, crop prices dropped and farmers couldn’t pay their loans back and cover their debt. Farmers started losing their farms because the banks started foreclosing on them. The tariffs also were a cause of the populist movement because they made the cost for their farming equipment increase. Then the railroads were charging the farmers higher prices because they felt secure in the knowledge that they didn’t have any competition. The farmers wanted the government to do something about all of this, so they created two laws. The first was the ICC (Interstate Commerce Commission) which was put into place in order to regulate what the railroads could charge and then the second was the Sherman Anti-
Trust Act. The populist movement is responsible for silver becoming the legal tender and change to the 17th Amendment that senators should be chosen by election.
Explain the rise of Jim Crow legislation in the South, and discuss its impact on the status of African Americans. Jim Crow wasn’t the name of a person, however, it managed to affect millions of people when it was established after the reconstruction. It was the name that described the...

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