Free Essay

Jrotc

In: Other Topics

Submitted By lekro
Words 73170
Pages 293
9 July 2010

1
LET 1 Table of Contents
Unit 1 - Citizenship in Action
Chapter 1: Foundations of Army JROTC and Getting Involved
U1-C1-L1
Army JROTC - The Making of a Better Citizen
U1-C1-L2
The Past and Purpose of Army JROTC
U1-C1-L3
Moving Up in Army JROTC - Rank and Structure
U1-C1-L4
The Signs of Success
U1-C1-L5
Your Personal Appearance and Uniform
U1-C1-L6
The Stars and Stripes
U1-C1-L7
Proudly We Sing - The National Anthem
U1-C1-L8
American Military Traditions, Customs, and Courtesies

3
9
13
21
25
37
45
51

Unit 2 - Leadership Theory and Application
Chapter 1: Being a Leader
U2-C1-L1
Leadership Defined
U2-C1-L2
Leadership Reshuffled
U2-C1-L3
Leadership from the Inside Out
U2-C1-L4
Principles and Leadership
U2-C1-L5
Sexual Harassment/Assault
Chapter 2: Leadership Skills
U2-C2-L1
Steps from the Past
U2-C2-L2
Roles of Leaders and Followers in Drill
U2-C2-L3
Using Your Leadership Skills/Taking Charge

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61
67
73
77
81
85
89

Unit 3 - Foundations for Success
Chapter 1: Know Yourself – Socrates
U3-C1-L1
Self Awareness
U3-C1-L2
Appreciating Diversity through Winning Colors
U3-C1-L3
Personal Growth Plan
U3-C1-L4
Becoming an Active Learner
U3-C1-L5
Pathways To Success (QBOL)
Chapter 2: Learning to Learn
U3-C2-L1
Brain Structure and Function
U3-C2-L2
Left and Right Brain Functions
U3-C2-L3
Learning Style and Processing Preferences
U3-C2-L4
Multiple Intelligences
Chapter 3: Study Skills
U3-C3-L1
Thinking Maps
U3-C3-L2
Reading For Meaning
U3-C3-L3
Study Habits that Work for You
Chapter 4: Communication Skills
U3-C4-L1
The Communication Process
U3-C4-L2
Becoming a Better Listener
Chapter 5: Conflict Resolution
U3-C5-L1
Causes of Conflict
U3-C5-L2
Conflict Resolution Techniques
Chapter 8: Making a Difference with Service Learning
U3-C8-L1
Orientation to Service Learning
U3-C8-L2
Plan and Train for Your Exploratory Project
U3-C8-L3
Project Reflection and Integration
Chapter 11: NEFE High School Financial Planning Program
U3-C11-L1
NEFE Introduction: Setting Financial Goals

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109
115
121
127
137
143
151
163
175
183
219
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237
245
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265
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Student Learning Plan
Unit 1: Citizenship in Action

Army JROTC- The Making of a Better Citizen [U1C1L1]

This lesson introduces you to the U.S. Army Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (JROTC) Program, its mission, and the Leadership Education and Training (LET) curriculum for this first level of your instruction. Completing the material in this course will require discipline and hard work, but Army
JROTC feels that the reward will be worth the effort you put forth. Through Army JROTC, you are building a foundation that will last a lifetime.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Identify how Army JROTC can impact your future
Linked Core Abilities
Take responsibility for your actions and choices

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will show that you have learned the target knowledge and skills:
G

write a short summary of how JROTC’s mission and program can help you meet your goals for success

Your performance will be successful when:
G

summary explains the mission of Army JROTC

G

summary outlines how various courses can help you attain your goals

G

summary includes use of the key words: cadet, challenges, candor, JROTC, mission, motivate, opportunities, unique Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Explain the mission of Army JROTC
b. Identify the challenges and opportunities in the Army JROTC program
c. Identify the opportunities of the Army JROTC program
d. Define key words: cadet, challenges, JROTC, mission, motivate, opportunities, unique

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson.
Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.

3

2

Army JROTC - The Making of a Better Citizen [U1C1L1]

_____1.

PREVIEW the Student Learning Plan competencies, learning objectives, performance standards and learning activities. CREATE a personal identity card describing some things about yourself, your goals, the purpose of JROTC and how that purpose can impact your personal goals. [Work independently] INTRODUCE other cadets using their identity cards. [Work with a large group] RECORD your responses to the reflection questions into your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CREATE a KWL Chart to include what you know about the JROTC purpose; types of goals you have, and how you anticipate JROTC helping you to attain your goals.

_____3.

THINK ABOUT how you would define each key word from this lesson. COMPARE your definitions to how they are used in Video #1: JROTC Today: Tomorrow’s Leaders. OBSERVE and ANSWER questions pertaining to the purpose and mission of JROTC and how it can affect your future. [Work independently] LEARN MORE about JROTC by reading Lesson 1: Army JROTC - The Making of a Better Citizen from Chapter 1 of the student text. COMPLETE Exercise #1: Matching. [Work independently] DEVELOP a definition of an assigned key word and DEFINE the mission of JROTC. PRESENT your definition and
JROTC mission statement to the class. [Work with a team of 3-6 cadets] RECORD responses to the reflection questions into your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] READ Lesson 1: Army JROTC - The Making of a Better Citizen from Chapter 1:
Foundations of Army ROTC and Getting Involved in the student text. (If possible, view Video 1.) DEFINE, in your own words, the mission of JROTC.

_____5.

VIEW Video #2: My Name is Drill. PRODUCE a product (skit, song, graph, chart or visual tool) that represents how you understand the mission of JROTC. PRESENT your product to the class. [Work with a team of 3-6 cadets] RECORD responses to the reflection questions into your Cadet Notebook.

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] COMPLETE Learning Activity 5 independently.

_____7.

THINK ABOUT what information you learned during this lesson that can help you move closer toward your own success goals. CREATE and PRESENT a Multi-Flow Map that illustrates how JROTC can affect your success goals. [Work in a team of 3-6 cadets] RECORD responses to reflection questions into your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently] OBTAIN the Army JROTC - The Making of a Better Citizen
Assessment Task from your instructor.

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] Cadets create a Multi-Flow Map illustrating how JROTC can affect your success goals. Cadets record responses to the reflection questions into their Cadet Notebook. OBTAIN the Your
Future and JROTC Assessment Task from your instructor.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1. COMPLETE the Army JROTC - The Making of a Better Citizen Assessment Task. USE the Scoring Guide to self-assess your work. SUBMIT your completed assessment task to your instructor for evaluation.
_____2. [SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

4

Exercise 1: Matching
Directions: Column A provides definitions of Key Words that are listed in Column B. Match the Key Word with the appropriate definition by placing its letter in the space to the left of Column A. You will not have to use all of the choices in Column B.
Column A
The title of the Army JROTC courses taught at the high school level

Column B
a.

cadet

b.

challenges

c.

JROTC

d.

LET

e.

motivate

f.

opportunities

g.

unique

A high school student enrolled in JROTC
Being the only one of its kind; being noteworthy, unsurpassed, or remarkable
Situations where a combination of time and/or circumstances are favorable for a particular purpose
To arouse the interest of one’s actions or efforts; to stimulate; the quality of requiring full use of one’s abilities, energy, or resources

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Unit 1: Citizenship in Action

Army JROTC - The Making of a Better Citizen Assessment
Task [U1C1L1]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:

Identify how Army JROTC can impact your future
Linked Core Abilities

Take responsibility for your actions and choices

Directions
You've just been introduced to the Army JROTC Program. Perhaps you've been exposed to this unique program before - through a friend or relative - or perhaps it is brand new to you. For this assessment task you are to summarize how JROTC might help you meet your future goals for success and how.
1. You are to write a short summary, using the attached Scoring Guide as a guide for criteria that will be evaluated. 2. When you are finished with your summary, self-assess your work using the same Scoring Guide.
3. Submit your completed assessment task to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
4. Consider adding this summary to your Cadet Portfolio.

7

Army JROTC - The Making of a Better Citizen Assessment Scoring
Guide
Criteria

Ratings

1. Summary explains the mission of Army JROTC

met

not met

2. Summary outlines how various courses can help you attain your goals

met

not met

3. Summary includes use of the key words: cadet, challenges, JROTC, mission, motivate, opportunities, unique

met

not met

4. Summary is word-processed or neatly presented

met

not met

5. Summary uses correct spelling, punctuation and grammar met

not met

6. Summary is included into your Cadet Portfolio

met

not met

FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR ACTIONS AND CHOICES
7. You apply professional/ethical values to guide actions and decisions

Name _________________________________________

met

not met

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

8

Student Learning Plan
Unit 1: Citizenship in Action

The Past and Purpose of Army JROTC [U1C1L2]

The JROTC program is designed to teach high school students the value of citizenship, leadership, service to the community, personal responsibility, and a sense of accomplishment, while instilling in them self-esteem, teamwork, and self-discipline. This learning plan will review the birth of the JROTC program and its purpose, allowing cadets to explore how JROTC can help them meet their goals for success.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Analyze the purpose of the Army JROTC program
Linked Core Abilities
Apply critical thinking techniques

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will show that you have learned the target knowledge and skills:


by writing a short paper on why JROTC is an important high school elective



by creating a Multi-Flow Map showing how the JROTC Leadership Education and Training (LET) program can help you meet your own goals for success

Your performance will be successful when:


Paper uses three key points about why JROTC is an important high school elective



Paper uses an example of how military training may have impacted an historical event in the United States



Paper uses proper spelling, grammar and punctuation



Multi-Flow Map shows how three JROTC Leadership Education and Training (LET) goals can help you meet three of your own goals for success

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Describe the U.S. congressional act that created JROTC
b. Identify the JROTC program outcomes
c. Explain significant historical events that combined military training and education
d. Define key words: conflict resolution, culturally diverse, National Defense Act, leadership

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson.
Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.

9

2

The Past and Purpose of Army JROTC [U1C1L2]

_____1.

PREVIEW the information in the Student Learning Plan including the competency, core abilities, learning objectives, performance standards, key words, learning activities and assessment activities. THINK
ABOUT the relationship between the military and education and how war and historical events have impacted the world. [Work independently] RESEARCH a famous battle or event in the United States and what events indicate that leadership training and military education may have been important.
ILLUSTRATE how these particular events and the relevant people involved may have been impacted by specific training or education. CREATE a Double-Bubble Map (or Venn Diagram) comparing and contrasting the JROTC Purpose of military education and leadership training to the education or training required during the event chosen. [Work in a team of 3-6 cadets] RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] RESEARCH and TAKE NOTES on the historical influences of military training on school classrooms or one of the topics provided by your instructor. SUMMARIZE the research in a short paper.

_____3.

READ Lesson 2: The Past and Purpose of Army JROTC from Chapter 1 of the student text. ANSWER the lesson review questions. IDENTIFY five key points about Army JROTC and ILLUSTRATE them in a visual tool (Thinking Map® or Graphic Organizer) of your choice. SHARE your illustrations with other teams.
ROTC. PREPARE a quiz and answer key of five questions and EXCHANGE with other teams. [Work in a team of 3-6 cadets] RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] READ Lesson 2: The Past and Purpose of Army JROTC from Chapter 1 of the student text. ANSWER the lesson review questions. ADD the answers to the lesson review questions to your Cadet Notebook.

_____5.

PREPARE for a debate on a provided topic. SELECT an “affirmative” or “negative” position. IDENTIFY key points supporting your position. PARTICIPATE in a debate using the guidelines established by your instructor. TRADE debate partners and positions throughout the activity. [Work with partner] RECORD responses to reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] SELECT one of the topics from “Direct Cadet Focus” and WRITE a short position paper, either “affirmative” or “negative” on the topic. ADD the paper to your Cadet Notebook.

_____7.

THINK ABOUT the military’s influence on cadets, society and education. DEVELOP a role play, rap, ballad, or product to teach others about Army JROTC and its purpose. PRESENT the project to others in the class. [Work with a team of 3-6 cadets] ADD responses to reflection questions to your Cadet
Notebook. OBTAIN the Past and Purpose of Army JROTC Assessment Task from your instructor. [Work independently] _____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] DEVELOP a rap, ballad, role play or product to describe the key points about
Army JROTC and its purpose in education. ADD your product to your Cadet Notebook. OBTAIN the
Past and Purpose of Army JROTC Assessment Task from your instructor.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

10

COMPLETE the Past and Purpose of Army JROTC Assessment Task. USE the scoring guide to self-assess your work. SUBMIT your completed assessment task to your instructor for evaluation.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Unit 1: Citizenship in Action

The Past and Purpose of Army JROTC Assessment Task
[U1C1L2]

Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:

Analyze the purpose of the Army JROTC program
Linked Core Abilities

Apply critical thinking techniques

Directions
1. Review the lesson question presented at the beginning of this lesson -- Why is Army JROTC an important high school elective?
2. Respond to that question in a short, written summary.
3. Include at least three points in your summary. One point must include an example of how military education may have impacted an historical event in the United States. (Use your research experience or class discussion information to assist you in your point.
4. Create a Multi-Flow Map showing how Leadership Education and Training (LET) goals can help you meet your own goals for success.
5. Self-assess your work using the attached scoring guide.
6. Submit your completed assessment task to your instructor for feedback and evaluation.
Recommendation: Add this assessment task to your Cadet Portfolio.

11

The Past and Purpose of Army JROTC Scoring Guide
Criteria

Ratings

1. Paper uses three key points about why JROTC is an important high school elective

met

not met

2. Paper uses an example of how military training may have impacted an historical event in the
United States

met

not met

3. Paper uses proper spelling, grammar and punctuation met

not met

4. Multi-Flow Map shows how three JROTC
Leadership Education and Training (LET) goals can help you meet three of your own goals for success met

not met

FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
APPLY CRITICAL THINKING TECHNIQUES
5. You evaluate sources of information

met

not met

6. You present logical arguments

met

not met

Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

12

Student Learning Plan
Unit 1: Citizenship in Action

Moving Up In Army JROTC-Rank and Structure
[U1C1L3]

Army JROTC has a well-defined organizational structure. Each person in the unit has an individual job that is part of a larger task, which is part of a much larger mission. This lesson introduces you to the major concepts of command within the military and the various U.S. Army and Army JROTC enlisted and officer ranks, as well as the typical organizational structure for a JROTC cadet battalion.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Illustrate the rank and structure of Army JROTC
Linked Core Abilities
Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will show that you have learned the target knowledge and skills:



by illustrating the organizational structure of your school’s cadet battalion by summarizing how specific roles you desire to achieve within JROTC can help you attain your personal goals for success

Your performance will be successful when:


Illustration features your school’s JROTC battalion organizational chart



Illustration includes properly labeled positions



Illustration includes names of people currently serving in those positions



Written summary includes positions you desire to achieve throughout your involvement in Army JROTC



Written summary includes explanation of how serving in various positions of the battalion can help you achieve personal goals for success



Written summary is neatly presented including proper spelling, grammar and punctuation

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Identify Army JROTC enlisted and officer insignia
b. Correlate cadet ranks to positions on the JROTC cadet battalion organization diagram
c. Correlate duties and responsibilities with positions in an Army JROTC cadet battalion
d. Evaluate how the organization supports the operation of the Army
e. Define key words: battalion, company, enlisted, platoons, specialist, squad, subordinate, succession, team(s) 13

2

Moving Up In Army JROTC-Rank and Structure [U1C1L3]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

PREVIEW the information in the Student Learning Plan including the competency, core abilities, learning objectives, performance standards, key words, learning activities and assessment activities. THINK
ABOUT the process you go through to complete a team project. [Work independently] PARTICIPATE in a team project to build and develop plans for building a house. COMPARE and CONTRAST the processes and people needed to build and develop the plan for building a house. [Work in a team of 3-6 cadets]
RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CONSIDER the process involved in building a house. WRITE DOWN all processes you can think of and reconfirm the order of their list upon completion. SUMMARIZE how building a house as a team is like any other team project. INCLUDE the house building processes, team players and summary in your Cadet Notebook.

_____3.

READ an assigned topic from Lesson 3: Moving Up in the Army JROTC (Rank and Structure) in Chapter
1 of the student text. CREATE a Triple T-chart and PRESENT your section of the chart to the rest of the class. RECOGNIZE the relationship between the pyramid of authority, the rank structure, and the battalion organization chart to specific responsibilities. COMPLETE Exercises #1 and #2 to check your comprehension of material. [Work in a team of 3-6 cadets] RECORD responses to the lesson review questions and reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] READ Lesson 3: Moving Up In Army JROTC (Rank and Structure) from Chapter
1 of the student text. ANSWER lesson review questions to check comprehension of material. CREATE a
Tree Map classifying the Battalion Organization. INCLUDE your Tree Map in your Cadet Notebook.

_____5.

DISCUSS what cadet ranks should be attached to each responsibility noted on the T-Chart from
Learning Activity 3. CONSIDER what would be an equivalent position in the school structure and
IDENTIFY what you would consider staff positions. [Work with a team of 3-6 cadets] RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] DRAW a rough organization chart of the school structure and the relationships to the Battalion Organization Chart. CREATE a ranking ladder showing all of the ranks in the cadet battalion at your school. DRAW a rough organization chart of the school structure and the relationships to the Battalion Organization Chart. COMPARE your charts to the evaluation chart provided by your instructor. INCLUDE charts in your Cadet Notebook.

_____7.

PARTICIPATE in a battalion organization structure activity. [Work with a large group] COMPLETE Exercise
#3: Matching and Exercise #4: Multiple-Choice before obtaining the assessment task for this lesson. [Work in a team of 3-6 cadets] RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] DRAW an organizational chart illustrating the structure of your cadet battalion.
LABEL each of the blocks accurately. INCLUDE battalion chart in your Cadet Notebook. OBTAIN the
Moving Up In JROTC Assessment Task from your instructor.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.
_____2.

14

COMPLETE the Moving Up In JROTC Assessment Task. USE the attached scoring guide to self-assess your work. SUBMIT your completed assessment task to your instructor for evaluation.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Exercise 1: Fill in the Blank
Directions: Complete the blanks in the following sentences using the words listed below them. You may have to use some of the words more than once or not at all; and in some cases, you may have to use the singular version of a word, its plural version, or both.
1.

A

is a subdivision of a company-size unit that normally consists of or more

2.

A

and its leader is usually a is made up of

or more

. and a

section, is commanded by a

,

and is the
3.

unit to be administratively self-sufficient by having a

.

A

is made up of

and is

or more

commanded by a

. Its equivalent in the cavalry is called a and in the artillery it is called a

4.

A

is approximately

normally led by a junior
5.

A

. the size of a

and it is

. is the

unit in the Army’s composition; it is composed

of a varying number of personnel depending on its type of element broken down into
, and it is led by an battalion company (companies) platoon(s) squad(s) team(s) battery (batteries) headquarters 1/4

. second lieutenant first lieutenant captain major lieutenant colonel staff(s) troop(s)
1/3

officer
NCO
smallest largest two three four
1/2

15

Exercise 2: Key Word Fill in the Blank
Directions: Use the key words indicated below to complete the following sentences. You may have to use some of these words more than once or not at all. enlisted NCO officer specialists
1.

The first three

subordinate subordination succession supervision positions are usually entry level. Certain

personnel are designated

and are comparable to the noncommissioned

officer rank of corporal.
2.

The chain of command is the commands pass from the leader to

16

of leaders through which authority and
, then down through the ranks.

Exercise 3: Matching
Directions: Column A provides ranks or descriptions of JROTC positions listed in Column B. Match the position with the appropriate rank/description by placing the correct letter in the space to the left of Column A.
Column A

Column B

Senior enlisted person in cadet battalion

a.

battalion commander

Cadet Captain

b.

battalion XO

Cadet Sergeant or Corporal

c.

battalion command sergeant major

d.

company commander

e.

company first sergeant

f.

platoon leader

g.

platoon sergeant

h.

squad leader

i.

team leader

Cadet First Lieutenant
Cadet Staff Sergeant
Cadet Lieutenant Colonel
Cadet Sergeant First Class
Senior enlisted person in cadet company
Cadet Major

17

Exercise 4: Multiple Choice
Directions: Select the correct answer to the following questions.
1.

The term used by the military to indicate the actual title held by a soldier is
a.

2.

Senate

b.

President

officer
.

c.

Congress

d.

Secretary of the Army

enlisted, specialist specialist, noncommissioned officer noncommissioned officer, technician entry level, noncommissioned officer

logistics

b.

operations

.
c.

security

d.

chain of command unity of command

b.
d.

administration

span of control pyramid of authority

chain of command unity of command

b.
d.

span of control pyramid of authority

The cadet battalion S-3 is responsible for
a.

18

d.

In every effective military unit, there must be only one commander who is responsible for all that the unit
.
does or all that it fails to do. This is referred to as
a.
c.

7.

rank

The number of immediate subordinates that one commander or leader can effectively control, supervise, or
.
direct is referred to as
a.
c.

6.

c.

The cadet battalion S-4 is responsible for
a.

5.

grade

The two divisions of the enlisted ranks that are based on experience and skill are and .
a.
b.
c.
d.

4.

b.

Commissioned officers are appointed by the
a.

3.

enlisted

.

administration

b.

security

.
c.

operations

d.

logistics

Unit 1: Citizenship in Action

Moving Up In JROTC-Rank and Structure Assessment Task
[U1C1L3]

Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:

Illustrate the rank and structure of Army JROTC
Linked Core Abilities

Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques

Directions
For this assessment task you will:
1. Draw an organizational chart or Brace Map that illustrates the structure of their cadet battalion.
Identify the key people in each box.
2. Determine what areas of the chart you would like to pursue as a personal goal for success in the
JROTC Program including Command Positions, Battalion Executive Officer, Battalion Coordinating
Staff Officers, Battalion Special Staff Officer, Battalion Personal Staff Officer, and any other company, platoon or squad personnel.
3. Explain the positions you wish to earn and why.
4. Explain why or how these positions will help you meet your own goals for success.
5. Your explanations shall be either neatly written or word-processed and are to accompany your illustration. 6. Use the attached scoring guide to self-assess your work prior to submitting to your instructor for evaluation. RECOMMENDATION: It is recommended that you consider adding this assessment task to your Cadet
Portfolio.

19

Moving Up In JROTC-Rank and Structure Scoring Guide
Criteria

Ratings

1. Illustration features your school's JROTC battalion organizational chart

met

not met

2. Illustration includes properly labeled positions

met

not met

3. Illustration includes names of people currently serving in those positions

met

not met

4. Written summary includes positions you desire to achieve throughout your involvement in Army
JROTC

met

not met

5. Written summary includes explanation of how serving in various positions of the battalion can help you achieve personal goals for success

met

not met

6. Written summary is neatly presented including proper spelling, grammar and punctuation

met

not met

FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
COMMUNICATE USING VERBAL, NON-VERBAL, VISUAL AND WRITTEN TECHNIQUES
7. You communicate accurately and clearly

met

not met

8. You communicate appropriately and professionally met

not met

9. You use active listening skills

met

not met

Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

20

Student Learning Plan
Unit 1: Citizenship in Action

The Signs of Success [U1C1L4]

The awards program is for any JROTC cadet who excels. It recognizes high levels of performance, excellence, and achievement. Since the JROTC program recognizes that not all cadets have the same abilities and skills, the Army designed its awards program to recognize as many personal traits as possible in cadets. In this learning plan you will identify the signs of success you would like to accomplish within your JROTC learning experience.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Determine which signs of success you plan to accomplish within JROTC
Linked Core Abilities
Build your capacity for life-long learning
Take responsibility for your actions and choices

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will show that you have learned the target knowledge and skills:
G

by creating a Tree Map that illustrates the types of awards under each award category you hope to achieve throughout your JROTC experience.

G

by writing a short description of each award goal you’ve set for yourself and how you plan to achieve it

Your performance will be successful when:
G

Tree Map includes each award category

G

Tree Map indicates which award under each category you hope to achieve within your JROTC learning experience G

You provide details about the desired award

G

You describe how you plan to achieve that award

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Compare the three types of unit decorations
b. Classify the components of individual award categories
c. Classify the four institutional award categories
d. Define award criteria
e. Define key words: academic awards, athletic awards, commitment, decorations, individual awards, initiative, military awards, miscellaneous awards, motivation, responsibility, unit awards

21

2

The Signs of Success [U1C1L4]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

PREVIEW the information in the Student Learning Plan including the competency, learning objectives, performance standards, core abilities, key words, learning activities and assessment activities. [Work in a large group] THINK ABOUT the various types of awards and recognition you have received in your life. Use the Partner Interview Technique. [Work independently] CREATE a Double-Bubble Map (or
Venn Diagram) comparing your accomplishments with another cadet. RECOGNIZE your partner’s accomplishments by introducing him or her to others in the class. [Work with a partner] RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] WRITE a short paragraph in your Cadet Notebook on something you have done that makes you proud.

_____3.

THINK ABOUT what awards you can win in JROTC and what is involved. JIGSAW the information in
Lesson 4: The Signs of Success from Chapter 1 of the student text. COMPLETE a Tree Map classifying key information about your award category. PRESENT your chart to others. RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] READ Lesson 4: The Signs of Success from Chapter 1 of the student text.
ANSWER the lesson review questions to check your comprehension of the material. CREATE a Tree
Map for each of the award categories. INCLUDE your Tree Map in your Cadet Notebook.

_____5.

THINK ABOUT the priority of personal awards and how to rank each. CREATE a Ranking Ladder or
Flow Map of all awards available to JROTC cadets, ordering highest to lowest awards. SHARE your visual tool with others. [Work with a partner] RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your
Cadet Notebook.

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] COMPLETE Learning Activity 5 independently.

_____7.

ILLUSTRATE an award ribbon, the criteria for attaining the ribbon and the steps toward achieving the award. RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook. OBTAIN the Signs of
Success Assessment Task from your instructor. [Work independently]

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] SELECT a ribbon that you would like to earn. DRAW the ribbon. IDENTIFY the criteria for attaining the ribbon and the steps required to earn the award. INCLUDE your illustration and criteria in your Cadet Notebook. OBTAIN the Signs of Success Assessment Task from your instructor.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

22

COMPLETE the Signs of Success Assessment Task. USE the scoring guide to self-assess your work. SUBMIT your completed assessment task to your instructor for evaluation.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Unit 1: Citizenship in Action

The Signs of Success Assessment Task [U1C1L4]

Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:

Determine which signs of success you plan to accomplish within JROTC
Linked Core Abilities

Build your capacity for life-long learning
Take responsibility for your actions and choices

Directions
For this assessment task you will need to complete the following:
1. Preview the attached scoring guide for a list of criteria you will be evaluated on.
2. Classify each of the award categories in a Tree Map.
3. Indicate which award under each category you hope to attain during your JROTC learning experience.
4. Provide a short description of each award you desire.
5. Provide a short description on how you hope to achieve each desired award.
6. Self-assess your work using the attached scoring guide.
7. Submit your Tree Map and written product to your instructor for evaluation and feedback.
**Recommendation: You may wish to include this assessment task in your Cadet Portfolio.

23

The Signs of Success Scoring Guide
Criteria

Ratings

1. Tree Map includes each award category

met

not met

2. Tree Map indicates which award under each category you hope to achieve within your JROTC learning experience

met

not met

3. You provide details about the desired award

met

not met

4. You describe how you plan to achieve that award met

not met

5. Your written product uses proper spelling, grammar and punctuation

met

not met

FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
BUILD YOUR CAPACITY FOR LIFE-LONG LEARNING
6. You access available resources for personal and professional growth

met

not met

TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR ACTIONS AND CHOICES
7. You exert a high level of effort and perseverance toward goal attainment

Name _________________________________________

met

not met

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

24

Student Learning Plan
Unit 1: Citizenship in Action

Your Personal Appearance and Uniform [U1C1L5]

We often form opinions of others based on their personal appearance. A good personal appearance complements your JROTC uniform. A neatly pressed and clean uniform, with properly placed ribbons, awards, and insignia shows that JROTC cadets have pride in themselves and their unit. This learning plan will expose you to all of the JROTC uniforms, their components, purpose and proper maintenance.
Activities and assessment will allow you to apply what you learn to your own appearance and uniform.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Demonstrate proper cadet appearance
Linked Core Abilities
Take responsibility for your actions and choices

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will show that you have learned the target knowledge and skills:
G

by conducting and receiving a JROTC uniform inspection

Your performance will be successful when:
G

you evaluate a fellow cadet’s uniform and appearance

G

you recognize appropriate placement of awards, insignia and decorations

G

you use the Inspection Criteria Observation Checklist for evaluation of a peer

G

you follow the guidelines established on the Inspection Criteria Observation Checklist for your own appearance and uniform

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Identify components of a JROTC Class A, Class B, and Battle Dress Uniform
b. Evaluate the appropriate occasions for wearing each uniform
c. Identify factors important to personal appearance
d. Determine guidelines for proper personal appearance in uniform
e. Describe proper maintenance of uniforms
f. Describe the uniform-wearing guidelines
g. Demonstrate placement of uniform awards, insignias and decorations
h. Conduct a uniform pre-inspection
i. Prepare for uniform inspection
j. Define key words: align, Battle Dress uniforms, bisecting, Class A and B uniforms, Chevron, ferrule, fitted, formal inspections, Garrison Cap, Gigline, hemmed, insignia, nap, nonsubdued, precedence, preinspection, shoulder marks, sized, tarnish

25

2

Your Personal Appearance and Uniform [U1C1L5]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

PREVIEW the information in the Student Learning Plan including the competency, learning objectives, performance standards, core abilities, key words, learning activities and assessment activities. THINK
ABOUT how a JROTC Cadet uniform and appearance might impact teamwork, personal success, or leadership. COMPARE the significance of the cadet uniform to other teams who require uniforms and CREATE a Double-Bubble Map (or Venn Diagram). [Work with a team of 3-6 cadets] OBSERVE a presentation of properly dressed and decorated cadets. COMPLETE Exercise #1: Matching.

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] PREVIEW fully dressed and decorated JROTC (in person or in illustrations).
COMPLETE Exercise #1: Matching, using the answer key to check your work. CREATE a Double-Bubble
Map comparing and contrasting the qualities of one type of uniform to a JROTC Uniform.

_____3.

THINK ABOUT the unique qualities of the JROTC uniform. ILLUSTRATE in a Bubble Map the qualities a
JROTC Cadet exhibits when his or her appearance meet the uniform standards. VIEW Video #1: Clean Start.
REFLECT on your appearance as a JROTC cadet by completing Exercise #6: Identify and Give Examples.
SHARE your reflection with a partner and use the Answer Key Exercise #6 to check examples. JIGSAW assigned portions of text from Lesson 5: Your Personal Appearance and Uniform from Chapter 1 of the student text. CREATE a visual tool (Thinking Map® or Graphic Organizer) to illustrate the information you are responsible for. COMPLETE Exercise #5: Fill in the Blank and Exercise #7: Multiple Choice.

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] READ Lesson 5: Your Personal Appearance and Uniform from Chapter 1 of the student text. CREATE a Tree Map (or Double T-Chart) noting the components, purpose and maintenance of three classes of JROTC uniforms. COMPLETE Exercise #1: Uniform Matching.

_____5.

CREATE a “branch” of a Class Brace Map, adding all parts necessary to include on the uniform. DISPLAY your “branch” of the Brace Map on the board for all to inspect and PROVIDE FEEDBACK for any revision.
DRESS a mannequin in an assigned JROTC Uniform. CREATE a sample Inspection Criteria sheet to use while viewing another team’s uniform display. PROVIDE inspection feedback on other uniforms. [Work with a team of 3-6 cadets]

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] COMPLETE Exercise #2: Arrange Awards on a Uniform and Exercise #3: JROTC
Uniform Items and Accessories. USE the answer keys to check your work. CREATE a Brace Map of three uniforms - one female and two male - showing all related parts of the uniform.

_____7.

PREPARE for an individual inspection of your own uniform as assigned by your instructor. INSPECT other cadet uniforms using Exercise #4. OBTAIN the Personal Appearance and Uniform Assessment
Task from your instructor. [Work independently]

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] COMPLETE activity above as instructed.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.
_____2.

26

COMPLETE the Personal Appearance and Uniform Assessment Task. USE the scoring guide to selfassess your work. SUBMIT your completed assessment task to your instructor for evaluation.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Exercise 1: Uniform Matching
Directions: Column A provides descriptions/uses of the JROTC uniforms listed in Column B. Match the uniform with the appropriate description/use by placing its letter in the space to the left of Column A.
Column A

Column B

Worn at formal social functions

a.

Army Combat uniform

Shoulder marks are not worn with this uniform

b.

Class A uniform

Worn at summer camp and for participation on special teams c.

Class B uniform

Wearing of a tie or neck tab is optional
Uniform most often worn during class assemblies
Worn during formal ceremonies
Requires the Army green coat to be worn with it
Worn during formal inspections
Female cadets are required to wear a T-shirt with it
Only uniform where all three items that make up the gig line can be easily inspected

27

Exercise 2: Arrange Awards on a Uniform
Directions: You have been awarded the following JROTC awards. Arrange them in the correct order of precedence (or order of merit), as you would wear them on your uniform. Place the award sequence numbers in their correct location in the illustration below.

Parade Ribbon
Personal Appearance Ribbon
Physical Fitness Award
Academic Achievement Ribbon
Drill Team Ribbon
Perfect Attendance Ribbon
Student Government Ribbon
LET Service Ribbon
Good Conduct Ribbon

28

(N-4-1)
(N-3-2)
(N-2-2)
(N-1-3)
(N-3-4)
(N-1-4)
(N-1-5)
(N-1-6)
(N-3-10)

Exercise 3: JROTC Uniform Items and Accessories
Directions: Columns A and C each contain a situation where a different cadet is preparing for a uniform inspection. Column B lists selected JROTC uniform items and accessories. Place a check mark beside the items and accessories in Column B that are required by these cadets for their inspections and an “O” for those items or accessories that are optional.
Note: You may not have to check off some of these items because they are neither required nor optional in certain situations. Column A

Column B

A female cadet sergeant preparing for an inspection of her short-sleeve Class B uniform would require:

Column C
A male cadet officer preparing for an inspection of his Class A uniform would require:

ACU Cap
Garrison Cap
Army Green Coat
Shoulder Marks
ACU Shirt
Army Green Shirt
Black Necktie
Black Neck Tab
Army Green Slacks/Trousers
ACU Trousers
Black Belt w/Brass Buckle
Sheer Stockings
Army Black Socks
Black Shoes or Pumps
ROTC Cap Insignia
JROTC Grade Insignia
ROTC Lapel Insignia
JROTC Corps Insignia
Nameplate
Ribbons/Medals

29

Exercise 4: Inspection Criteria Observation Checklist
Directions: Circle the correct condition for each item. All circled items need to be in the first and second column to satisfactorily pass inspection.
Headgear:

Clean?
Brass shined?
Brass properly placed?

Ex
Ex
Ex

Sat
Sat
Sat

Unsat
Unsat
Unsat

Hair:

Properly styled/groomed?
Off the ears/collar?

Ex
Yes

Sat
No

Unsat

Shirt/Coat:

Properly sized?
Clean and pressed?
Grade insignia placement?
Nameplate placement?
Honor Star placement?
Ribbons/badges placement?
Unit crest placement?
Shoulder cord(s) placement?
Pockets buttoned?
Strings?

Yes
Ex
Ex
Ex
Ex
Ex
Ex
Ex
Yes
Yes

No
Sat
Sat
Sat
Sat
Sat
Sat
Sat
No
No

Properly sized?
Clean and pressed?
Belt buckle shined?
Gigline straight?

Yes
Ex
Ex
No

No
Sat
Sat
Yes

Shined/dusted?
Black socks?

Ex
Yes

Sat
No

Trousers:

Shoes:

Key:
Unsat = Unsatisfactory
Sat = Satisfactory
Ex = Excellent

30

Unsat
Unsat
Unsat
Unsat
Unsat
Unsat
Unsat

Unsat
Unsat

Unsat

Exercise 5: Fill in the Blank

Directions: Complete the following sentences.

1. The only two items that you can wear on your wrist when you are in the JROTC uniform (as long as the style of those items is conservative and in good taste) are a and an

.

2. You can wear not more than rings with the JROTC uniform (again, as long as the style of your rings is conservative and in good taste).
3. Female cadets may also wear small circular earrings not to exceed the JROTC uniform.

inch in diameter with

4. Male cadets are to keep their sideburns no lower than the

.

5. Female cadets are to keep their hair styled so that it does not touch the

.

6. When taking care of brass, brightly polish the

,

and

,

.

7. The only exception to polishing brass articles are the polish, scrub them with

and

; instead of using
.

31

Exercise 6: Identify and Give Examples
Directions: Identify four factors of personal appearance and give one example of the proper application of each factor. PERSONAL APPEARANCE FACTORS
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

32

EXAMPLES

Exercise 7: Multiple Choice
Directions: Circle the correct answer.
1.

Cadet officers wear their insignia of grade using
a.
b.
c.
d.

2.

3.

.

1/8” below the top seam on the left pocket flap
1/8” above the top seam on the right pocket flap
1/4” above the top seam on the right pocket flap
1/8” above the top seam on the left pocket flap
.

on the shoulder marks or above the left pocket above the right pocket or centered below the button on the left pocket on the shoulder marks or centered below the button on the right pocket directly below the nameplate or above the right pocket

Position the nameplate
a.
b.
c.
d.

7.

grade, one inch (1”)
ROTC, one-half inch (1/2”) grade, one-half inch (1/2”)
ROTC, one inch (1”)

The two places where unit crests can be worn on the JROTC uniform are
a.
b.
c.
d.

6.

insignia worn on the garrison cap for enlisted cadets is positioned from the crease.

Medals are worn
a.
b.
c.
d.

5.

.

1/8” below the top seam on the left pocket flap
1/8” above the top seam on the right pocket flap
1/4” above the top seam on the right pocket flap
1/8” above the top seam on the left pocket flap

The

a.
b.
c.
d.
4.

subdued pin-on insignia nonsubdued pin-on insignia shoulder marks a combination of nonsubdued pin-on insignia or shoulder marks depending on unit operating procedures Ribbons are worn
a.
b.
c.
d.

.

.

1/8” below the top seam on the right pocket flap centered on the right pocket between the top seam and the top of the buttonhole
1/4” below the top seam on the left pocket flap centered on the left pocket between the top seam and the top of the buttonhole

How many special medals and/or marksmanship badges can you wear on the uniform and on which pocket do you wear them?
a.
b.
c.
d.

Not more than two medals and badges combined and on the right pocket
Not more than three medals and badges combined and on the right pocket
Not more than two medals and badges combined and on the left pocket
Not more than three medals and badges combined and on the left pocket

33

8.

Wear your ribbons in order of preference from
a.
b.
c.
d.

9.

.

1/4” above the top seam on the left pocket flap
1/8” above the top seam on the right pocket flap
1/4” above the top seam on the right pocket flap
1/8” above the top seam on the left pocket flap

Center insignia of grade that is worn on the shirt collar with the center line of the insignia bisecting the point of each collar and up from the edge of the collar point.
a.
b.

34

top to bottom and from right to left top to bottom and from left to right right to left and from bottom to top left to right and from bottom to top

The Honor Unit insignia is worn
a.
b.
c.
d.

10.

.

one-eighth of an inch (1/8”) one inch (1”)

c.
d.

one-half of an inch (1/2”) three-quarters of an inch (3/4”)

Unit 1: Citizenship in Action

Your Personal Appearance and Uniform Assessment Task
[U1C1L5]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:
Demonstrate proper cadet appearance
Linked Core Abilities

Take responsibility for your actions and choices

Directions
The assessment task for this lesson requires that you conduct and receive a peer uniform inspection using the Exercise 4: Inspection Criteria Observation Checklist.
Before you begin the assessment preview the scoring guide for guidelines on the criteria that will be evaluated. 1. Complete an inspection of a peer uniform during the Application Phase of this lesson.
2. Use Exercise 4: Inspection Criteria Observation Checklist to evaluate your assigned uniform.
3. Provide feedback to the inspected cadet verbally and in writing. (Provide them with a copy of the checklist). For all criteria marked as "unsatisfactory" give a written explanation on what was observed and how the cadet can remedy the problem.
4. Include a copy of the inspection you conducted and a copy of the inspection checklist provided to you about your own uniform and appearance.
5. Indicate on your personal evaluation any changes you made to your own personal appearance or uniform based on the feedback provided to you by a peer.
6. Be sure to self-assess your work using the attached scoring guide.
7. Submit your completed assessment task to your instructor for evaluation.
Recommendation: Include the documents required for this assessment task in your Cadet Portfolio.

35

Your Personal Appearance and Uniform Scoring Guide
Criteria

Ratings

1. You evaluate a fellow cadet's uniform and appearance met

not met

2. You use the Inspection Criteria Observation
Checklist for evaluation

met

not met

3. You provide suggestions for improvement to evaluated cadet

met

not met

4. You provide written and oral feedback to evaluated cadet

met

not met

5. You make changes to your own appearance and uniform according to a peer's evaluation

met

not met

FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR ACTIONS AND CHOICES
6. You apply professional/ethical values to guide actions and decisions

met

not met

7. You follow established policies and procedures

met

not met

Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

36

Student Learning Plan
Unit 1: Citizenship in Action

The Stars and Stripes [U1C1L6]

The U.S. Flag is the most notable of the symbols for our nation. When we show respect for the U.S. flag, we are displaying honor to our country. In this learning plan you will explore the history of the U.S. flag. You will also learn and practice the rules for displaying and folding the flag.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Demonstrate protocol to show respect for and handle the United States Flag
Linked Core Abilities
Take responsibility for your actions and choices
Do your share as a good citizen in your school, community, country, and the world

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will show that you have learned the target knowledge and skills:
G

by folding, displaying, and saluting the flag and observing how a business displays the flag

Your performance will be successful when:
G

you correctly fold the flag, hold it correctly and make the correct folds in the correct order

G

you take appropriate steps to salute the flag when you are in uniform and when you are in civilian attire

G

you correctly raise, lower, and display the flag

G

you complete a notebook entry that describes and evaluates how a local business displays the U.S. flag

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Explain the history of the United States flag
b. Explain the symbolism of the various parts and colors on the flag
c. Classify the size and use of each basic type of United States flag
d. Demonstrate how to show respect for the United States flag
e. Compare the rules for displaying flag in different situations
f. Describe the correct way to fold the United States flag
g. Define key words: color(s), ensign, garrison flag, half-staff, halyard, pennant, post flag, staff, standard, storm flag, union

37

2

The Stars and Stripes [U1C1L6]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

PREVIEW this learning plan including the competency, core abilities, learning objectives, performance standards, learning activities, and assessment activities. THINK ABOUT what you know about showing respect for the U.S. flag. CREATE a KWL Chart to list what you know and what you want to know about the flag. SHARE your chart with the class. [Work with a team] ADD your chart and reflection question responses to your Cadet Notebook.

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] Carry out Learning Activity 1 independently.

_____3.

LISTEN to a briefing about proper care of the U.S. Flag. GATHER information about an assigned flag topic by reading Lesson 6: The Stars and Stripes in Chapter 1 of your student text and using Internet sources. PREPARE to demonstrate an assigned skill and to share one important historical fact about the flag for the class. [Work with a team] ANSWER the review questions at the end of the lesson. ADD responses to review questions and reflection questions to your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] GATHER information about saluting the flag, displaying the flag, and folding the flag by reading Lesson 6: The Stars and Stripes in Chapter 1 of your student text. COMPLETE
Exercise #1: Our Flag, Exercise #2: The History of Our Flag, and Exercise #3: Saluting Our Flag to learn about respecting the flag. ANSWER the review questions at the end of the lesson. ADD responses to review questions to your Cadet Notebook.

_____5.

CREATE a Flow Map to list the steps to properly fold the flag as you VIEW Video #1: Flag Folding.
PRACTICE folding the flag. PRACTICE saluting the flag. RECORD reflection questions responses in your Cadet Notebook.

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 5 with a cadet or student partner.

_____7.

DEMONSTRATE ways to display the flag using notes and resources shared in class. ADD what you learned about respecting the flag to the KWL Chart. [Work with a team] OBTAIN the Stars and Stripes
Assessment Task from your instructor. PREVIEW the Scoring Guide. SELF ASSESS your skill using the
Scoring Guide. [Work with a partner] RECORD responses to reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 7 independently.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

38

COMPLETE the Stars and Stripes Assessment Task. SELF-ASSESS your work using the Scoring Guide.
SUBMIT your work to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Exercise 1: Our Flag
Directions: Complete the crossword puzzle using the Key Words shown below.
Color
Colors
Ensign
Garrison Flag

Half-staff
Halyard
Pennant
Post flag

Staff
Standard
Storm Flag
Union

ACROSS:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Rope or tackle used for hoisting or lowering the flag
Flag measuring five by nine and one-half feet; used for inclement weather
A term that means the national and positional and/or organizational flags
The blue rectangle covered with stars on the U.S. flag
A long, narrow flag tapering to a point at the end
Another word for flagpole which can be used to carry a unit’s guidon or colors

DOWN:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Position of the U.S. flag used to honor military and nationally important deceased persons
Flag measuring 20 by 38 feet; used for ceremonial occasions
A flag that is displayed from an aircraft, ship, or boat as the symbol of nationality
This term implies only the national (or the U.S.) flag
Flag measuring 10 by 19 feet; used for everyday occasions
A term interchangeable with “colors;” formerly used for mounted, motorized, or mechanized organizations
2
1
3

4
2

6

3

---

4
5

6

39

Exercise 2: The History of Our Flag
Directions: Select the correct answer to the following questions.
1.

Congress passed a law in ____ returning the flag back to its original design of 13 stripes, fearing that too many stripes would spoil the true design of the flag.
a.1794

2.

b.1818

d. Hawaii - 1959

Flag Day is celebrated on ______ to commemorate the creation of the first Stars and Stripes flag by the
Continental Congress in Philadelphia in 1777.
b. May 30

c. June 14

d. June 16

From the days of Betsy Ross in 1777 to Flag Day in 1996, the U.S. flag that has flown as the banner of this nation for the longest period of time is the one with _____ stars.
a. 50

40

c. Hawaii – 1960

1777, Delaware, Pennsylvania
1779, Tennessee, Ohio
1794, Vermont, Kentucky
1818, Illinois, Alabama

a. July 1
5.

b. Alaska – 1960

The first two stars and stripes added to the original U.S. flag took place in ____ to add the states of
_____and _____.
a.
b.
c.
d.

4.

d.1959

The last star added to the U.S. flag represents the state of ___, which was admitted to the Union in ___.
a. Alaska – 1959

3.

c.1912

b. 48

c. 15

d. 13

Exercise 3: Saluting Our Flag
Directions: Use the phrases indicated below to complete the following sentences. You may have to use some of these phrases more than once or not at all. stand at parade rest stand at attention render the hand salute stand at attention with your right hand over your left breast stand at attention with your right hand over your heart place your right hand over your heart
1.

If you are outdoors, in civilian clothes without a hat, but not in formation, and the Colors pass you, you should ________________ until the Colors are six steps past you.

2.

If you are indoors, in uniform, but not in formation, and the U.S. flag passes you, you should __________ until the flag is six steps past you.

3.

If you are outdoors, in uniform wearing a hat, but not in formation, and the U.S. flag passes you, you should ___________ and ______________ until the flag is six steps past you.

4.

If you are outdoors, in civilian clothes without a hat, but not in formation, and you pass the Colors, you should ____________ when you are about six steps from the Colors.

41

Information Sheet 1: Steps to Folding a U.S. Flag

1. Bring the lower striped section of the flag up over the blue field.
2. Then, fold the “folded edge” over to meet the “open edge.”
3. Start a triangular fold by bringing the lower striped corner to the “open edge.”
4. Fold the outer point inward and parallel with the “open edge” to form a second triangle.
5. Continue to fold the flag in triangles until the entire length of the flag is folded with only the blue field and the margin showing.
6. Tuck the margin into the pocket formed by the folds at the blue field edge of the flag
7. Only the blue field should be visible and it should have the triangular shape of a cocked

hat.

42

Unit 1: Citizenship in Action

The Stars and Stripes Assessment Task [U1C1L6]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:
Demonstrate protocol to show respect for and handle the United States Flag
Linked Core Abilities

Take responsibility for your actions and choices
Do your share as a good citizen in your school, community, country, and the world

Directions
For this assessment task you will demonstrate ways to show respect for the U.S. flag. You will demonstrate how to fold the flag, how to display the flag, and proper ways to salute and honor the flag.
You will also write a notebook entry to describe and assess how a local business displays the U.S. flag.
1. Preview the criteria listed in the Scoring Guide to plan for your assessment.
2. Demonstrate the following in the presence of your instructor:
a. Fold the U.S. flag
b. Salute and honor the U.S. flag in uniform and out of uniform
c. Display the U.S. flag as directed by your instructor
3. Observe how a local business displays the U.S. flag for a week. Make notebook entries to describe how the flag was displayed. Note how the flag was displayed correctly or incorrectly. Explain how the business should correct any improper display.
4. Check your work using the criteria detailed in the Scoring Guide.
5. Submit your completed notebook entry to your instructor for feedback and a grade.

43

The Stars and Stripes Scoring Guide
Criteria
1. You correctly fold the flag, holding it correctly and making the correct folds in the correct order
2. You take appropriate steps to salute and honor the flag when you are in uniform and when you are in civilian attire
3. You correctly raise, lower, and display the flag
4. You complete a notebook entry that describes and evaluates how a local business displays the U.S. flag
FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR ACTIONS AND CHOICES
5. You apply professional/ethical values to guide actions and decisions
6. You follow established policies and procedures
Name _________________________________________

Ratings met not met met not met

met met not met not met

met met not met not met

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

44

Student Learning Plan
Unit 1: Citizenship in Action

Proudly We Sing - The National Anthem [U1C1L7]

When you hear the National Anthem, do you know what to do? National anthems are usually songs in a culture that become so popular that the people claim them as a symbol for their nation. In this learning plan you will examine ways to show respect when the National Anthem is played.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Demonstrate courtesies during the playing of the National Anthem
Linked Core Abilities
Take responsibility for your actions and choices
Do your share as a good citizen in your school, community, country, and the world

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will show that you have learned the target knowledge and skills:


by participating in a ceremony when the flag is presented during the playing of the National Anthem

Your performance will be successful when:


you observe appropriate courtesies during the singing of the National Anthem in and out of uniform



you follow protocol when displaying the U.S. flag during the National Anthem inside or outside

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Explain the history of the National Anthem
b. Describe cadet courtesies when the National Anthem is played
c. Explain the history of the official National March
d. Define key words: anthems, bombardment, national march, symbol, “The Star-Spangled Banner,” under arms Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson.
Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

PREVIEW this learning plan including the competency, core abilities, learning objectives, performance standards, learning activities, and assessment activities. THINK ABOUT situations when you hear the “Star Spangled Banner” played. LISTEN to Audio #1: Star Spangled Banner. CREATE

45

2

Proudly We Sing - The National Anthem [U1C1L7]

a Bubble Map to describe how a person might feel while hearing the National Anthem. CIRCLE feelings you have when you hear the National Anthem. SHARE your map with the class. [Work with a partner] ADD your map and reflection question responses to your Cadet Notebook.
_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] Carry out Learning Activity 1 independently. Or write a notebook entry on why patriot songs are still remembered today.

_____3.

LISTEN to a briefing about the national march and the bugle call “To the Colors.” LEARN ABOUT the history of the National Anthem and how to show respect by reading Lesson 7: Proudly We Sing—The
National Anthem in Chapter 1 of your student text. GATHER information from the student text,
Internet sources, and U.S. Code 36 to create a skit or role-play about: 1) the origins of our National
Anthem; 2) showing respect when our National Anthem is played in a variety of situations; or 3) showing respect during the playing of friendly foreign nations’ anthems. [Work with a team] ANSWER the review questions at the end of the lesson. ADD responses to review questions and reflection questions to your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] LEARN ABOUT the history of the National Anthem and how to show respect by reading Lesson 7: Proudly We Sing—The National Anthem in Chapter 1 of your student text.
GATHER information from the student text and other sources to write a script as if you were a sportscaster watching the battle of Fort McHenry. LISTEN to Audio #3: The Stars and Stripes Forever and
Audio #4: To the Colors to become familiar with the music. ADD responses to review questions to your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]

_____5.

PRESENT your skit or role-play to the class. WRITE a notebook entry to summarize what you learned from watching the other teams’ skits. [Work a team] RECORD reflection question responses in your
Cadet Notebook.

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CREATE a presentation to inform others about the history of the National
Anthem and protocol for showing honor when the Anthem is played.

_____7.

OBTAIN the Proudly We Sing - National Anthem Assessment Task #1 from your instructor. PREVIEW the
Scoring Guide. PREPARE to participate in a ceremony to present the flag during the playing of the National
Anthem at a local event. [Work with a team] REFLECT on what you experienced and learned about showing respect for the National Anthem. RECORD responses to reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.
[Work independently]

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] PREPARE to share your National Anthem presentation with a student organization or class. REFLECT on what you experienced and learned about showing respect for the National
Anthem.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

46

COMPLETE the Proudly We Sing - National Anthem Assessment Task #1. SELF-ASSESS your rehearsal using the Scoring Guide. ARRANGE for your instructor to observe your performance for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Unit 1: Citizenship in Action
Proudly We Sing – The National Anthem Assessment Task
[U1C1L7]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:
Demonstrate courtesies during the playing of the National Anthem
Linked Core Abilities

Take responsibility for your actions and choices
Do your share as a good citizen in your school, community, country, and the world

Directions
For this assessment task you will demonstrate courtesy during the singing of the National Anthem. You will conduct a ceremony for a local event that requires the presenting of the U.S. flag and the singing of the National Anthem. You will also write a notebook entry to explain why you favor a particular passage of the Star Spangled Banner.
1. Preview the criteria listed in the Scoring Guide to plan for your assessment.
2. Schedule a time to conduct an opening ceremony at a local event.
3. Assign roles and rehearse in preparation to present the U.S. Flag and play the National Anthem for the ceremony. Check your performance using the criteria detailed in the Scoring Guide.
4. Conduct the ceremony in the presence of your instructor for feedback and a grade.
5. Write a notebook entry to describe your favorite passage of the Star Spangled Banner. Explain why this paragraph is your favorite. Submit your completed notebook entry to your instructor for feedback and a grade.

47

Proudly We Sing – The National Anthem Scoring Guide
Criteria
1. You observe appropriate courtesies by facing the flag, standing at attention, and rendering the hand salute during the singing of the National Anthem when outdoors in uniform
2. You observe appropriate courtesies by facing the flag and standing at attention during the singing of the National Anthem when indoors in uniform
3. You observe appropriate courtesies by facing the flag, removing your hat, standing at attention, and placing your hand over your heart during the singing of the National Anthem when in civilian clothing
4. You correctly display the flag during the National Anthem
5. Your notebook entry cites a passage from the Star- Spangled Banner and explains why that passage is important to you
FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR ACTIONS AND CHOICES
6. You apply professional/ethical values to guide actions and decisions
7. You follow established policies and procedures
Name _________________________________________

Ratings met not met

met

not met

met

not met

met met not met not met

met met not met not met

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

48

Unit 1: Citizenship in Action

Proudly We Sing-The National Anthem Assessment Task 2
[U1C1L7]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:
Demonstrate courtesies during the playing of the National Anthem
Linked Core Abilities

Take responsibility for your actions and choices
Do your share as a good citizen in your school, community, country, and the world

Directions
For this assessment task you will teach others about the courtesies shown during the singing of the
National Anthem. You will also write a notebook entry to explain why you favor a particular passage of the Star Spangled Banner.
1. Preview the criteria listed in the Scoring Guide to plan for your assessment.
2. Prepare a presentation to inform others about how to show honor when the National Anthem is played.
During the presentation share the history of the National Anthem. Check your performance using the criteria detailed in the Scoring Guide.
3. Schedule a time to share your presentation with a student organization or elementary class.
4. Share the presentation in the presence of your instructor for feedback and a grade.
5. Write a notebook entry to describe your favorite passage of the Star Spangled Banner. Explain why this paragraph is your favorite. Submit your completed notebook entry to your instructor for feedback and a grade.

49

Proudly We Sing – The National Anthem Scoring Guide 2
Criteria
Ratings
1. You accurately describe and demonstrate courtesies to be shown during the met not met singing of the National Anthem
2. You accurately demonstrate protocol when displaying the U.S. flag inside or met not met outside during the playing of the National Anthem
3. Your presentation is appropriate for the audience and engages the audience met not met
4. You clearly and accurately apply standards of spelling and English grammar met not met during the presentation
5. Your notebook entry cites a passage from the Star- Spangled Banner and met not met explains why that passage is important to you
FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
DO YOU SHARE AS A GOOD CITIZEN IN YOUR SCHOOL, COMMUNITY, COUNTRY, AND IN
THE WORLD
6. You recognize your role as a consumer and citizen in a democracy met not met
7. You adapt to and work effectively with a variety of situations, individuals or met not met groups Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

50

Student Learning Plan
Unit 1: Citizenship in Action

American Military Traditions, Customs and Courtesies
[U1C1L8]

The purpose of military traditions, customs, and courtesies is to develop pride in the military service and to establish strong bonds of professional and personal friendships - patterns of behavior that enhance the military way of life. They provide a framework for applying the principles of respect in military organizations and they reflect unit discipline and readiness. In this lesson you will learn about and demonstrate military traditions, customs and courtesies.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Explore the purpose of military traditions, customs, and courtesies
Linked Core Abilities
Treat self and others with respect

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will show that you have learned the target knowledge and skills:


when you demonstrate respect towards your JROTC cadre, school staff, fellow cadets, and other students



when you properly render a salute and salutation to a senior officer

Your performance will be successful when:


you identify situations that require displays of respect and how it affects the military and other organizations



your cadet notebook entry provides explanations of traditions, customs and courtesies



your cadet notebook entry provides an example of rendering military honors



your cadet notebook entry provides an example of saluting with or without wearing a hat or cap

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Describe types of personal salutes and when they are executed
b. Match Army ranks to their proper titles
c. Identify situations requiring a salute or other forms of respect to senior officers
d. Define key words: courtesies, customs, dress, espirit de corps, mess, position of honor, reporting, ruffles and flourishes, salutes, self-propelled, traditions, uncasing, uncovered

51

2

American Military Traditions, Customs and Courtesies [U1C1L8]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

PREVIEW this learning plan including the competency, learning objectives, performance standards, linked core abilities, learning activities, and assessment activities. DEFINE the terms “respect”, “traditions & customs” and “courtesies”. [Work in teams] CREATE a Circle Map (or Concept Web) about one of the three terms. SHARE AND DISCUSS your thoughts with others in the class. [Work in a large group]. RECORD definitions and responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 1 independently.

_____3.

LEARN ABOUT military traditions, customs and courtesies by researching the assigned subject in your text, other reading material and online. [Work in teams] PREPARE and DELIVER a presentation about your assigned subject matter to the class [Work independently and as part of a team] RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] READ Lesson 9 and create a Tree Map with the headings “Traditions and
Customs” and “Courtesies” showing what you learned about each. RECORD your ideas in your Cadet
Notebook.

_____5.

PARTICIPATE in a small-group exercise practicing saluting and giving a greeting, or salutation, to a senior officer. [Work in teams]. PRACTICE rendering a salute, receiving and returning a salute. CRITIQUE team members on their performance. Rotate roles within the group. RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] REVIEW the salute diagram and appropriate salutations in your text. PRACTICE rendering salutes in a mirror. CRITIQUE yourself on your performance. RECORD your critique in your Cadet Notebook.

_____7.

CREATE a Tree Map that identifies school staff positions, equivalent military ranks, and appropriate salutations to each. [Work in teams]. GREET school administrators, teachers, and staff appropriately when you meet them. COMPLETE the American Military Traditions, Customs and Courtesies Assessment
Task. [Work independently]. CONDUCT a self-assessment and turn the exercises into the instructor for a grade. RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] COMPLETE Learning Activity 7 independently.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

52

COMPLETE the American Military Traditions, Customs and Courtesies Assessment Task. USE the scoring guide to self-assess your work. SUBMIT your completed task to your instructor for evaluation and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Worksheet 1: Military Traditions, Customs and Courtesies
Part 1
Directions: Column A provides definitions of key words listed in Column B. Match the key word with the appropriate definition by placing the correct letter in the space to the left of Column A.
Column A
To attire with a certain degree of uniformity
A drum and bugle salute
Long-established practices followed as a matter of course among a people Having the ability within itself to move
Being without a hat or headgear
The firing of a salute normally by a battery of guns
The passing down of elements of a culture from one generation to another A sign or form of exchange used to greet or to show respect and recognition Polite gestures or remarks
The policy of keeping seniors to your right while walking or sitting
A common feeling of pride found in members of
Removing the case from Colors attached to a staff
Presenting oneself to a senior
A place in the military where meals are served

Column B
a. cannon salutes
b. courtesies
c. customs
d.
e.
f.
g.

dress esprit de corps mess position of honor

h. reporting
i.
j.
k.
l.
m.
n.

ruffles and flourishes salute self-propelled traditions uncasing a group uncovered Part 2
Directions: Column A provides definitions of key words listed in Column B. Match the key word with the appropriate definition by placing the correct letter in the space to the left of Column A.
Column A

Column B
Place the tip of your right forefinger to the forehead near and slightly to the right of your right eyebrow

a. wearing headgear with a visor and with glasses

Place the tip of your right forefinger to that point on the glasses where the temple piece of the frame meets the right edge of your right brow

b. uncovered with glasses

Place the tip of your right forefinger on the rim of the visor slightly to the right of your right eye

c. wearing headgear without a visor and without glasses 53

Part 3
Circle a Salute
Directions: Military regulations require you to salute when you meet and recognize a person who is entitled to that honor with certain exceptions. Circle all of the situations below where a salute is required.
a.

When you or the other person are in civilian clothes

b.

When you meet the other person in a public place, such as a store or theater

c.

When you are in a group uncasing the Colors

d.

While you are indoors (you are not reporting or on guard duty)

e.

When you are reporting

f.

When you hear the sounding of honors

g.

When the national colors pass you

h.

While you are riding on public transportation, such as a bus or a train

i.

When you hear the “National Anthem,” “To the Colors,” or “Hail to the Chief” (If you are in uniform.)

j.
k.

When pledging allegiance to the flag while outdoors and in uniform

l.

When pledging allegiance to the flag while indoors

m.

54

When you hear reveille or retreat and you are in uniform

When on duty as a guard

Unit 1: Citizenship in Action

American Military Traditions, Customs and Courtesies
Assessment Task [U1C1L8]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:
Explore the purpose of military traditions, customs, and courtesies
Linked Core Abilities

Treat self and others with respect

Directions
Fort this assessment task, you will be completing the Traditions, Customs, and Courtesies Worksheet and writing a brief summary about what respect in military organizations.
1. Think about the traditions, customs and courtesies that you studied in this lesson.
2. Complete the Traditions, Customs and Courtesies worksheet.
3. Write a brief summary about how respect is demonstrated and how it affects military organizations.
4. Self-assess your work using the answer key and the detailed criteria in the scoring guide.
5. Submit your worksheet and summary to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
6. When turning in your worksheet and summary, render a correct salute and give an appropriate salutation to your instructor.
Recommendation: Practice showing respect inside and outside the classroom.

55

American Military Traditions, Customs and Courtesies Scoring Guide
Criteria
1. You complete the Traditions, Customs and Courtesies worksheet.
2. You identify examples of military traditions, customs and courtesies. 3. You explain how displays of respect affect military organizations.
4. You salute and give an appropriate salutation to your instructor when turning in your exercises.
FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES
TREAT SELF AND OTHERS WITH RESPECT
5. You identify situations that require a display of respect in the military and in other organizations.
Name _________________________________________

Ratings met not met met not met met met

not met not met

met

not met

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

56

Student Learning Plan
Unit 2: Leadership Theory and Application

Leadership Defined [U2C1L1]

This learning plan takes a look at the definition of leadership skills. Learning good leadership skills and becoming a successful leader are not easy tasks. With this basic introduction of leadership, you can begin to appreciate the responsibilities that successful leaders have to themselves, their subordinates, their supervisors, and their organization. Activities in this plan allow you to examine your own leadership behavior strengths and weaknesses and make improvements as necessary.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Identify your leadership strengths and opportunities for improvement
Linked Core Abilities
Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques
Take responsibility for your actions and choices
Treat self and others with respect

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your competence:


through a written summary of your own leadership behaviors and suggestions for improvement

Your performance will be successful when:


Written Summary recognizes leadership behaviors in relationship to purpose, direction and motivation



Written Summary recognizes personal leadership behavior strengths



Written Summary identifies need for improvement on specific leadership behaviors

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Describe leader behaviors that create the desire to follow
b. Explore leader behaviors related to purpose, direction, and motivation
c. Identify ways to develop leadership behaviors
d. Define key words: behavior, direction, leadership, motivation, purpose

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson.
Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.

57

2

Leadership Defined [U2C1L1]

_____1.

PREVIEW the information in the Student Learning Plan including the competency, learning objectives, performance standards, core abilities, learning activities and assessment activities. WATCH Video #1 and
SHARE with the class the leadership characteristics, attitudes or behaviors you observed in the video.
THINK ABOUT other characteristics, attitudes or behaviors associated with leadership and continue to add to your class Bubble Map. [Work in a large group] CONTRIBUTE to a class definition of a leader based on the identified behaviors. [Work in a team of 3-6 cadets] RESPOND to the reflection questions in your
Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CONSIDER a time when they were part of a successful team. CREATE a
Bubble Map with the leader behaviors that made that situation successful. INCLUDE your
Bubble Map in your Cadet Notebook.

_____3.

COMPARE the class definition of leadership to the definition in Lesson 1: Leadership Defined from
Chapter 1 of the student text. REVIEW the class list of leadership behaviors and determine how they relate to the Purpose, Direction and Motivation referenced in the student text. ADD your list of behaviors and examples to the class Tree Map. PARTICIPATE in a class discussion on commonalities/differences in each category of behaviors. [Work with a team of 3-6 cadets] RECORD responses to reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 3 independently.

_____5.

In your assigned team, USE a Double-Bubble Map to illustrate the contrasting qualities of the subject outlined in a provided case study. VIEW Flash #1 and Flash #2. DESCRIBE to others the undesirable and desirable qualities of the team player in the study and compare them to the Definition of Leadership. ’
OUTLINE how your "subject" can improve as a leader of a team.

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] READ Case Studies 1-3 from Lesson 1: Leadership Defined in Chapter 1 of the student text. ANSWER the questions after each Case Study and ADD the answers to the questions to your Cadet Notebook.

_____7.

OBTAIN the Leadership Defined Assessment Task. THINK ABOUT the behaviors that you exhibit in a leadership situation and behaviors that you would like to improve for leadership situations. READ Case Study 4.
[Work independently] SHARE how positive leadership behaviors were modeled. DISCUSS areas you would like to develop in your own leadership. [Work with a partner] ADD your responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook. REVIEW the details of the Leadership Defined Assessment Task.

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 7 independently.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

58

COMPLETE the Leadership Defined Assessment Task. USE the attached Scoring Guide to self-assess your work. SUBMIT your completed assessment task to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Unit 2: Leadership Theory and Application

Leadership Defined Performance Assessment Task [U2C1L1]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities

Identify your leadership strengths and opportunities for improvement
Linked Core Abilities

Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques
Take responsibility for your actions and choices
Treat self and others with respect

Directions
For this lesson assessment you will create a profile of your own leadership behaviors and recognize areas that you would like to improve. For this assessment you will:
1. Do a self-assessment of your present leadership behaviors such as:
·
Behaviors you presently possess.
·

Behaviors you believe are positive.

·
·

Behaviors you believe are negative.
Behaviors you would like to change.

·

Behaviors you would like to add to your leadership style

2. Read the Case Study #4 from the “Leadership Defined” section of the student text. Identify the behavior examples cited in the Case Study and compare them to your own.
3. Write a summary describing the leadership behaviors identified in Case Study #4 and how your leadership style is similar or different. Be sure to cite examples of identified leader behaviors as they relate to purpose, direction, and motivation. Compare your own strengths and weaknesses to those identified. 4. Use the attached scoring guide to self-assess your work.
5. Submit your completed assessment to your instructor for evaluation.
RECOMMENDATION: It is recommended that you add this assessment task to your Cadet Portfolio.

59

Leadership Defined Performance Assessment Scoring Guide
Criteria

Ratings

1. Written Summary recognizes leadership behaviors in relationship to purpose, direction and motivation

met

not met

2. Written Summary recognizes personal leadership behavior strengths

met

not met

3. Written Summary identifies need for improvement on specific leadership behaviors

met

not met

4. Written Summary compares personal leadership behavior strengths and weaknesses to Case Study #4 from student text

met

not met

5. Written Summary uses proper spelling, grammar and punctuation met

not met

FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR ACTIONS AND CHOICES
7. You exert a high level of effort and perseverance toward goal attainment

Name _________________________________________

met

not met

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

60

Student Learning Plan
Unit 2: Leadership Theory and Application

Leadership Reshuffled [U2C1L2]

For a long time, there has been great interest in determining what makes a good leader. Researchers have dug deep in the past to examine the origins and evolution of leadership. This lesson explains the theories and approaches to leadership as they have changed, and identifies historical events that have shaped them. This lesson also explores how leadership styles are applied to different kinds of situations.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Compare leadership styles
Linked Core Abilities
Take responsibility for your actions and choices
Treat self and others with respect

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your competence:
G

by writing a short summary describing how each of the four approaches and associated leadership styles

Your performance will be successful when:
G

your summary includes descriptions of each of the four leadership approaches: traits; behavior; scientific management; and contingency

G

your summary describes the leadership styles associated with the leadership approaches

G

your summary contains descriptions of how you applied a specific leadership style to a leadership situation

G

your summary contains an explanation of the leadership style that you feel would work best for you

G

your summary is free of errors in spelling, grammar, and punctuation

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Describe how leadership has evolved
b. Compare different approaches to leadership
c. Discuss what leadership styles work best in different situations
d. Define key word: approach

61

2

Leadership Reshuffled [U2C1L2]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

PREVIEW this learning plan including the competency, learning objectives, performance standards, core abilities, learning activities, and assessment activities. OBSERVE Visual #1: Agree/Disagree. PARTICIPATE in a class discussion about employer perceptions. CREATE a Tree Map categorizing the
“agree” and “disagree” reasons. [Work as a class] ADD completed Tree Map to your Cadet Notebook.
RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 1 independently. RECORD Tree Maps in your Cadet Notebook.

_____3.

VIEW a presentation or CONDUCT RESEARCH on leadership styles. LEARN ABOUT or REVIEW your assigned leadership approaches and styles in the Leadership Reshuffled lesson of your student text.
[Work in Teams] ANSWER the review questions at the end of the lesson. [Work with a partner]
RESEARCH the evolution of your assigned topic. SHARE your approach with the class.
[Work in teams] RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 3 independently. CREATE Flow Map describing the evolution of approaches to leadership. ADD your Flow Maps to your Cadet Notebook.

_____5.

PARTICIPATE in a team exercise building a tower with provided materials. THINK ABOUT the leadership approach and style of the team leader. CREATE a Bubble Map describing the qualities and effectiveness of the leader. PRESENT your Bubble Map to the class. [Work in teams] RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] REFLECT on a leadership situation that required an autocratic, laissez-faire or democratic style of leadership. SUMMARIZE the advantages and disadvantages of the leadership style on the situation. ADD your summary to your Cadet Notebook.

_____7.

OBTAIN the Leadership Reshuffled Assessment Task. BRAINSTORM ideas about leadership approaches and styles to put on bumper stickers. CREATE bumper stickers that explain the material covered in this lesson. INTERPRET other cadets’ bumper stickers and share your interpretation with the class. [Work in pairs] OBTAIN the Leadership Reshuffled Assessment Task. RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 7 independently.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1. Complete the Leadership Reshuffled Assessment Task. SELF-ASSESS your work using the Scoring Guide.
SUBMIT your work to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
_____2. [SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

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Exercise #1: Leader Roles
Directions: Assign one of the following roles to each team leader.

Role 1

Role 2

Role 3

Your job is to be as much of an autocratic leader as you possibly can. It is important that you demonstrate this style of leadership to your team without informing them of what you are doing. Avoid accepting any suggestions from any team member. Give orders about the planning and construction. The tower is to be constructed from your ideas only.
Your job is to be as much of a laissez-faire (hands off) leader as you possibly can.
It is important that you demonstrate this style of leadership to your team without informing them of what you are doing. Avoid any interference with their planning beyond the minimum necessary for the maintenance of classroom order. Exercise a deliberate abstention from direction or interference. The tower is to be the result of the team’s ideas.
Your job is to be as much of a democratic leader as you possibly can. It is important that you demonstrate this style of leadership to your team without informing them of what you are doing. When a suggestion is made by you or by any team member, ask to see how many of the team members agree with the idea.
Push for some degree of consensus before any idea is acted on. The tower is to be the result of a consensus of ideas.

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64

Unit 2: Leadership Theory and Application

Leadership Reshuffled Assessment Task [U2C1L2]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities.
Compare leadership styles
Linked Core Abilities

Take responsibility for your actions and choices
Treat self and others with respect

Directions
As you work through the lessons in Chapter 1: Being a Leader, you will examine leadership approaches and styles, principles of leadership, and situations where leadership is applied. For this lesson assessment you will examine leadership approaches and styles and describe how they are applied.
1. Preview the criteria listed in the scoring guide to plan for your assessment.
2. Think about the leadership topics that you studied in this lesson.
3. Write a short summary about leadership approaches and styles.
4. Self-assess your work using the criteria detailed in the scoring guide.
5. Submit your summary to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
Recommendation: Add this assessment task to your Cadet Portfolio, and make notes about what you will do when you take charge of a drill unit.

65

Leadership Reshuffled Assessment Scoring Guide
Criteria
Ratings
1. Written summary includes descriptions of each of the four met not met leadership approaches: traits; behavior; scientific management; and contingency 2. Written summary describes the leadership styles associated with met not met the leadership approaches
3. Written summary contains descriptions of how you applied a met not met specific leadership style to a leadership situation
4. Written summary contains an explanation of the leadership style met not met that you feel would work best for you
5. Written summary if free of errors in spelling, grammar, and met not met punctuation FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR ACTIONS AND CHOICES
6. You assess the impact of your values on actions and decisions met not met
TREAT SELF AND OTHERS WITH RESPECT
7. You work well with individuals and groups from diverse met not met backgrounds Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

66

Student Learning Plan
Unit 2: Leadership Theory and Application

Leadership from the Inside Out [U2C1L3]

Values are the driving force behind action. When a leader gives his or her unit a particular mission, it is usually based on what the leader believes to be right. Both the leader’s decisions and actions as well as the followers’ actions must be motivated by their inherent values - strong feelings of right vs. wrong, ethical vs. unethical, or important for the majority vs. important for personal gain. In this learning plan you will explore how your values impact your actions and you will develop a personal code of ethics based on your values.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Develop a personal code of ethics, comparing the values it represents with the Army Values
Linked Core Abilities
Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques
Take responsibility for your actions and choices
Apply critical thinking techniques

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your competence:


by developing a personal code of ethics and writing a brief comparison of the values represented in your personal code of ethics and the Army Values

Your performance will be successful when:


Personal Code of Ethics expresses your key values



Personal Code of Ethics describes your attitudes about the worth of people, concepts and other things



Personal Code of Ethics describes what you need to be, every day, in every action you take



Personal Code of Ethics is concise and easy to understand



you compare the values expressed in your personal code of ethics with the Army Values



you detail the similarities and differences between the values expressed in your personal code of ethics and the Army Values

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Describe the values that leaders possess
b. Assess how attitudes affect a person’s actions
c. Explore how life experiences affect a person’s values
d. Describe how the similarities and differences in people’s values can impact how they interact with others

67

2

Leadership from the Inside Out [U2C1L3]

e. Relate your values to the seven Army Values
f. Define key words: beliefs, bribery, coercion, dilemma, ethics, favoritism, norms, prejudices, selfless service, tenets, tunnel vision, unethical, values

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

PREVIEW this learning plan including the competency, learning objectives, performance standards, linked core abilities, learning activities, and assessment activities. THINK ABOUT the army definition of “values”. LIST the attitudes that you have about family, school, community, people, work, and leadership. [Work individually] PARTICIPATE in a discussion on how your attitudes affect your actions.
SHARE one or more examples of how your attitudes have affected your actions [Work in teams]
RECORD notes and responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 1 independently. RECORD notes in your
Cadet Notebook.

_____3.

PARTICIPATE in a “Value Cards” activity to learn about army values. VIEW a presentation or CONDUCT
RESEARCH on Army Values. LEARN MORE OR REVIEW by reading the Leadership from the Inside Out lesson of your text. [Work in teams] ANSWER the review questions at the end of the lesson. [Work with a partner] CREATE a Bubble Map listing adjectives that describe the qualities of your assigned army value.
[Work in teams] SHARE your map with the rest of the class. PROVIDE examples of when you have lived this value in your personal life. [Work in a large group] RECORD answers to the review and reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 3 independently.

_____5.

PLAY the “Values for Dollars” game. [Work with the class] Exercise #1: Values Questions. CREATE a song, poem, skit or rap illustrating one of the values that you purchased. [Work in teams] SHARE your song, poem, skit or rap with the rest of the class. RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your
Cadet Notebook.

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CREATE a song, poem, skit or rap illustrating a value that you consider important. RECORD your song, poem, skit or rap in your Cadet Notebook and perform it for a friend if possible.

_____7.

VIEW the video “The Making of a Leader”. CREATE a Tree Map with a column for each of the 7 values.
LIST examples of how General Colin Powell expresses each value. [Work as a class] WRITE an entry in your Cadet Notebook describing how you would like to be viewed when you are an adult in terms of the values that you represent. [Work in teams] OBTAIN the Leadership from the Inside Out Assessment Task from your instructor. RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 7 independently.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.
_____2.

68

COMPLETE the Leadership from the Inside Out Assessment Task. SELF-ASSESS your work using the Scoring
Guide. SUBMIT your work to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Exercise #1: Value Questions
Directions: Read and answer each question listed below.

1. What were the original value cards that you received?

2. Why did you want to keep/trade them?

3. How much money did you have at the end of the activity?

4. Were you more interested in obtaining meaningful value cards or in accumulating the most money possible? 5. Which value cards did you most wish to obtain?

6. Are you satisfied with the value cards that you now have?

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70

Unit 2: Leadership Theory and Application

Leadership from the Inside Out Assessment Task [U2C1L3]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities.
Develop a personal code of ethics, comparing the values it represents with the Army Values
Linked Core Abilities

Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques
Take responsibility for your actions and choices
Apply critical thinking techniques

Directions
For this assessment task you will write a Personal Code of Ethics and a brief comparison of the values reflected in your Personal Code of Ethics and the Army Values.
1. Review the criteria detailed in the scoring guide.
2. Think about what you have learned about values in this learning plan.
3. Write a Personal Code of Ethics reflecting your personal values and how you wish to live out those values. 4. Write a brief comparison of how the values reflected in your Personal Code of Ethics relate to the seven Army Values.
5. Check your work using the criteria detailed in the Scoring Guide.
6. Submit your completed assessment to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
7. Place your completed documents in your Cadet Portfolio if desired.

71

Leadership from the Inside Out Assessment Scoring Guide
Criteria
Ratings
1. Personal Code of Ethics expresses your key values met not met
2. Personal Code of Ethics describes your attitudes about the met not met worth of people, concepts and other things
3. Personal Code of Ethics describes what you need to be, met not met every day, in every action you take
4. Personal Code of Ethics is concise and easy to understand met not met
5. You compare the values expressed in your personal code met not met of ethics with the Army Values
6. You detail the similarities and differences between the met not met values expressed in your personal code of ethics and the
Army Values
FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
COMMUNICATE USING VERBAL, NON-VERBAL, VISUAL, AND WRITTEN TECHNIQUES
7. You communicate accurately and clearly met not met
8. You apply standards of spelling, English grammar, and met not met punctuation TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR ACTIONS AND CHOICES
9. You apply professional/ethical values to guide actions and met not met decisions APPLY CRITICAL THINKING TECHNIQUES
10. You support viewpoints/arguments with reason and met not met evidence Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

72

Student Learning Plan
Unit 2: Leadership Theory and Application

Principles and Leadership [U2C1L4]

Leadership is the process of influencing others to accomplish a mission. The leadership skills that you use to accomplish a mission are the same whether you are in a classroom, your neighborhood, church, home or JROTC. To be a good leader, you must provide teammates with purpose, direction, and motivation. Purpose helps them to understand why they are performing a task, direction shows what they must do, and motivation gives them the desire or initiative to do everything they are capable of doing to accomplish their mission. In this learning plan you will explore the principles of leadership and determine what you must do to improve your leadership abilities.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Draft a plan for using the 11 principles of leadership to improve your leadership abilities
Linked Core Abilities
Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques
Take responsibility for your actions and choices
Apply critical thinking techniques

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your competence:


by creating a Principles and Leadership Development Plan

Your performance will be successful when:


Principles and Leadership Development Plan references the 11 principles of leadership



Principles and Leadership Development Plan includes a self-assessment of your current leadership abilities



Principles and Leadership Development Plan includes specific goals and objectives for improving your leadership abilities



Principles and Leadership Development Plan lists specific strategies for improving your leadership abilities



Principles and Leadership Development Plan describes how you will track your progress



Principles and Leadership Development Plan describes how you will measure success



Principles and Leadership Development Plan identifies one or more mentors that you will rely on to provide feedback on your leadership development

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Describe 11 principles of leadership
b. Describe the BE, KNOW, and DO attributes of a leader
c. Identify how a cadet can demonstrate leadership character and competence
d. Define key words: attributes, censure, convictions, diversified, doctrine, philosophy, recrimination, self-evaluation

73

2

Principles and Leadership [U2C1L4]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

PREVIEW this learning plan including the competency, learning objectives, performance standards, linked core abilities, learning activities, and assessment activities. THINK ABOUT what you have learned about leadership. CONTRIBUTE to the development of a Tree Map listing what an effective leader must “Be”, “Know”, and “Do”. [Work in teams] SHARE your Tree Map with the rest of the class.
RECORD notes and responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 1 independently. RECORD notes in your
Cadet Notebook.

_____3.

OBSERVE a flash exercise on the 11 Principles of Leadership. PARTICIPATE in a discussion about leadership principles. LEARN MORE OR REVIEW by the Principles and Leadership section in your text. ANSWER the review questions at the end of the section. [Work with a partner] CREATE a Circle Map describing your assigned principle of leadership. RECORD notes and responses to the reflection questions in your
Cadet Notebook.

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] READ Lesson 4: Principles and Leadership from your student text. CREATE a Tree Map that outlines the 11 Principles of Leadership. RECORD notes in your Cadet Notebook.

_____5.

SHARE your map with the rest of the class. [Work in teams] PROVIDE examples of how your principle can be applied in your life. [Work in a large group] RECORD notes and answers to the review and reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] UPDATE your Tree Map with your own characteristics of leadership.

_____7.

OBSERVE a flash exercise on the Be, Know, Do model. PARTICIPATE in a class discussion on the key points of the model. CONNECT the leadership principles to what a leader must Be, Know and Do by adding items to the Tree Map created in Learning Activity 1. RECORD notes and responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] READ Lesson 4: Principles and Leadership from your student text and answer the lesson review questions. CREATE a Tree Map that outlines the 11 Principles of Leadership. RECORD notes in your Cadet Notebook.

_____9.

CREATE a poster, advertisement or commercial promoting the leadership abilities of your team.
[Work in teams] SHARE your poster, advertisement or commercial with the rest of the class. RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____10.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] UPDATE the Tree Map from the Inquire Phase highlighting and/or including some of your own BE, KNOW, DO attributes as a leader.

_____11.

THINK ABOUT a situation where you may need to take on a leadership role at school, in the community or in your family such as providing leadership for a service learning project or getting a job as a camp counselor. [Work individually] OBTAIN the Principles and Leadership Assessment Task from your instructor. DEVELOP a plan to improve your leadership abilities using the 11 principles of leadership.
[Work independently] RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____12.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 11 independently.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.
_____2.

74

COMPLETE the Principles and Leadership Assessment Task. SELF-ASSESS your work using the
Scoring Guide. SUBMIT your work to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Unit 2: Leadership Theory and Application

Principles and Leadership Development Plan Assessment
Task [U2C1L4]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:
Compare leadership styles
Linked Core Abilities
Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques
Take responsibility for your actions and choices
Apply critical thinking techniques

Directions
For this assessment task you will create a Principles and Leadership Development Plan.
1. Review the criteria detailed in the scoring guide.
2. Think about what you have learned about leadership in this learning plan.
3. If you have not already done so, complete a leadership self-assessment such as the Leadership Profile in Success Profiler. Reflect on the results of your Leadership self-assessment.
4. Develop a Principles and Leadership Development Plan to help you improve and enhance your leadership skills.
5. Check your work using the criteria detailed in the Scoring Guide.
6. Submit your completed Principles and Leadership Development Plan to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
7. Place your completed plan in your Cadet Portfolio if desired.

75

Principles and Leadership Development Plan Scoring Guide
Criteria
Ratings
1. Principles and Leadership Development Plan references met not met the 11 principles of leadership
2. Principles and Leadership Development Plan includes a met not met self-assessment of your current leadership abilities
3. Principles and Leadership Development Plan includes met not met specific goals and objectives for improving your leadership abilities 4. Principles and Leadership Development Plan lists specific met not met strategies for improving your leadership abilities
5. Principles and Leadership Development Plan describes met not met how you will track your progress
6. Principles and Leadership Development Plan describes met not met how you will measure success
7. Principles and Leadership Development Plan identifies met not met one or more mentors that you will rely on to provide feedback on your leadership development
FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
COMMUNICATE USING VERBAL, NON-VERBAL, VISUAL, AND WRITTEN TECHNIQUES
8. You communicate accurately and clearly met not met
9. You apply standards of spelling, English grammar, and met not met punctuation TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR ACTIONS AND CHOICES
10. You apply professional/ethical values to guide actions met not met and decisions
APPLY CRITICAL THINKING TECHNIQUES
11. You support viewpoints/arguments with reason and met not met evidence Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

76

Student Learning Plan
Unit 2: Leadership Theory and Application

Sexual Harassment/Assault [U2C1L5]

Sexual harassment is a common and serious problem for both boys and girls in American high schools.
The majority of the sexual harassment that occurs involves one student harassing another, or peer sexual harassment. What one individual perceives to be teasing or joking can be perceived as sexual harassment by another. Victims of sexual harassment and assault can suffer anxiety, fear, sleep disturbances and other difficulties. Sexual harassment is illegal, and it is essential that all students learn to prevent sexual harassment and assault. In this learning plan you will learn how to recognize sexual harassment as well as steps that you can take to prevent and/or stop sexual harassment and assault.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Take action to prevent and/or stop sexual harassment and assault
Linked Core Abilities
Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques
Take responsibility for your actions and choices
Treat self and others with respect

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will show that you have learned the target knowledge and skills:
G

by developing a plan to prevent and/or address sexual harassment/assault

Your performance will be successful when:
G

you describe a potential situation involving sexual harassment or assault

G

you develop a plan to prevent and/or address the sexual harassment or assault

G

Prevention Plan defines sexual harassment/assault

G

Prevention Plan includes strategies for preventing sexual harassment/assault

G

Prevention Plan includes strategies for addressing sexual harassment/assault

G

Prevention Plan includes resources available to victims of sexual harassment or assault

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Determine the potential consequences of sexual harassment/assault for the individuals involved
b. Assess the role of individual point of view in determining what is sexual harassment
c. Locate resources for assisting victims of sexual harassment or assault
d. Define key words: date rape, perpetrator, sexism, sexual harassment, vulnerable

77

2

Sexual Harassment/Assault [U2C1L5]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

PREVIEW this learning plan including the competency, learning objectives, performance standards, linked core abilities, learning activities, and assessment activities. VIEW the In Real Life-Sequence 2 video scenarios. THINK ABOUT situations that you have experienced, witnessed, or heard about that could be considered sexual harassment or assault. COMPARE those incidences to one of the assigned scenarios you just watched in the video. LIST one or two incidences of sexual harassment witnessed in your assigned video. Then, DEVELOP a team definition of sexual harassment. [Work in teams] SHARE your list and definition with the rest of the class. CONTRIBUTE to the development of a definition for sexual harassment.
[Work with the class] RECORD your notes and responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 1 independently. RECORD your notes in your
Cadet Notebook.

_____3.

VIEW a presentation or CONDUCT research on sexual harassment or assault. LEARN MORE or REVIEW the Sexual
Harassment/Assault lesson of the student text. [Work in Teams] ANSWER the review questions at the end of the section. [Work with a partner] VIEW the In Real Life - Sequence 3 video scenarios . COMPARE your class definition
.
one provided in Visual #1: Policy.

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 3 independently. RECORD your answers to the review questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____5.

CREATE a Multi-Flow Map to show the personal, social, physical and legal consequences to all parties involved in sexual harassment/assault. SHARE your map with others in the class. [Work in teams]

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT learning activity 5 independently. RECORD your notes in your
Cadet Notebook.

_____7

VIEW the In Real Life-Sequence 4 video scenarios. DETERMINE how your assigned scenario response
.
demonstrated either Supportive Communication or Positive Confrontation. DEVELOP a Tree Map to classify ‘"how’ to" stop peer harassment, creating a category in each column with descriptors under each.
COMPARE your map to the communication models. [Work in teams]

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 7 independently.

_____9.

VIEW the In Real Life-Sequence 5 video scenarios for possible solutions to the presented scenarios in this lesson. DIVIDE into teams and ROLE-PLAY two new concluding responses to an assigned video scenario.
USE the two communication models in your role play. [Work in teams] OBTAIN the Sexual Harassment/
Assault Assessment Task from your instructor.

_____10.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 9 independently. RECORD your notes in your
Cadet Notebook.

_____11.

REVIEW the Sexual Harassment/Assault Assessment Task directions and Scoring Guide. CONSIDER your own sexual harassment/assault prevention plan, using what you've learned in this lesson.
DEVELOP a prevention plan and PREPARE to add it to your Cadet Notebook or PRESENT it to a peer, a group or others in your program. [Work independently]

_____12.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 11 independently. RECORD your notes in your
Cadet Notebook.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

78 _____2.

COMPLETE the Sexual Harassment/Assault Assessment Task. SELF-ASSESS your work using the Scoring Guide. SUBMIT your work to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Unit 2: Leadership Theory and Application

Sexual Harassment Prevention Plan Assessment Task
[U2C1L5]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities
Take action to prevent and/or stop sexual harassment and assault
Linked Core Abilities
Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques
Take responsibility for your actions and choices
Treat self and others with respect

Directions
For this assessment task you will create a Sexual Harassment/Assault Prevention Plan.
1. Write a description of a potential sexual harassment/assault situation based on one of the following scenarios: •

You are confronted by one of your peers who finds your sexually related joking and teasing offensive and disturbing.



You are the target of sexual harassment by one of your peers.



You are a victim of sexual assault.



You witness one of your peers sexually harassing another student.

2. Develop a Sexual Harassment/Assault Plan for the situation that you have described.
3. Check your work using the criteria detailed in the Scoring Guide.
4. Submit your completed plan to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
5. Place your completed plan in your Cadet Portfolio if desired.

79

Sexual Harassment/Assault Prevention Plan Scoring
Guide
Criteria
Ratings
1. You describe a potential situation involving met not met sexual harassment or assault
2. You develop a plan to prevent and/or address met not met the sexual harassment or assault
3. Prevention Plan defines sexual met not met harassment/assault 4. Prevention Plan includes strategies for met not met preventing sexual harassment/assault
5. Prevention Plan includes strategies for met not met addressing sexual harassment/assault
6. Prevention Plan includes resources available to met not met victims of sexual harassment or assault
TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR ACTIONS AND CHOICES
7. You apply professional/ethical values to guide met not met actions and decisions
TREAT SELF AND OTHERS WITH RESPECT
8. You act with a sense of equity met not met
COMMUNICATE USING VERBAL, NON-VERBAL, VISUAL, AND WRITTEN TECHNIQUES
9. You select appropriate means to convey a met not met message 10. You communicate appropriately and met not met professionally Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

80

Student Learning Plan
Unit 2: Leadership Theory and Application

Steps from the Past [U2C2L1]

This lesson introduces you to the importance of drill and ceremonies, their history and purpose. The precision and timing of drill promotes skill, teamwork, and discipline. In later lessons and in
Leadership Lab, you will see how you can polish your image and personal appearance with the right look, prepare yourself for inspections, understand the roles of leaders and followers in drill, and practice individual drill movements. In this learning plan you will examine the origins of drill in the
Continental Army and identify how drill is used in today’s military and in your life.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Explain the importance of drill in military discipline
Linked Core Abilities
Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your competence:


by creating a skit, poem, rap or song about the origins of drill and the purpose it serves in the American military and in daily life

Your performance will be successful when:


you describe the condition of the Continental Army prior to the establishment of drill



you explain who Baron Friedrich von Steuben was and what he did to establish drill in the Continental
Army



you explain five purposes of drill in wartime and peacetime



you describe two examples of the role of drill in your daily life



your skit, poem, rap or song engages your audience

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Summarize the origin of drill dating back to the Continental Army of the United States
b. Identify five purposes of drill in times of war and peace
c. Compare the qualities of discipline instilled in the Continental Army to what military drill develops today
d. Define key words: discipline, drill, maneuver, precision, unison

81

2

Steps from the Past [U2C2L1]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

PREVIEW this learning plan including the competency, learning objectives, performance standards, core abilities, learning activities, and assessment activities. VIEW a video clip of drills in daily life and a drill competition. CREATE a chart to define drill and identify non-military drills. [Work with the class]
RECORD your chart and your responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] Carry out Learning Activity 1 independently. SHARE your chart with your instructor. RECORD your chart in your Cadet Notebook.

_____3.

LEARN ABOUT the origins and purpose of drill in the Continental Army by watching a short video and researching an assigned question in your text and on the internet. RECORD research on chart paper for use in Learning Activity 5. DISCUSS how you would explain the origins and purpose of drill to someone from a different country. [Work in teams] RECORD your notes and responses to the reflection questions in your
Cadet Notebook.

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 3 independently.

_____5.

VIEW a video of a drill competition, or OBSERVE a drill demonstration. DISCUSS the role of drill in the military and in everyday life. PARTICIPATE in an initial drill activity. RECORD your notes and responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 5 independently. PRESENT your skit, rap, poem or song to the instructor.

_____7.

OBTAIN the Steps from the Past Assessment Task and Scoring Guide from your instructor. CREATE a skit, rap, poem, or song about the answers to your assigned questions. USE musical tapes or CDs, or visual aids found in your research to enhance your product. PRESENT your product to the class. [Work in teams] DISCUSS the role of drill in the military and in everyday life. [Work with the class] RECORD your charts and responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 7 independently. RECORD your chart in your
Cadet Notebook.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

82

COMPLETE the Steps From the Past Assessment Task. SELF-ASSESS your work using the Scoring Guide.
SUBMIT your work to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Unit 2: Leadership Theory and Application

Steps from the Past Assessment Task [U2C2L1]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities
Explain the importance of drill in military discipline
Linked Core Abilities

Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques

Directions
As you work through the lessons in Chapter 2: Leadership Skills, you will develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to be an active participant in drill. For this lesson assessment, you will create an engaging and fun skip, rap, song or poem about the origins of drill in the military, and its purpose in the military and daily life.
1. Preview the criteria listed in the scoring guide to plan for your assessment.
2. Think about the origins and purpose of drill that you studied in this lesson.
3. Create your skit, rap, poem or song about the origins of drill in the military, Baron Friedrich von
Steuben's role in establishing drill in the Continental Army, and its purpose in the military and in daily life. 4. Self-assess your work using the criteria detailed in the scoring guide.
5. Schedule a time to deliver your presentation to your peers and instructor for feedback and a grade.
Recommendation: Add this assessment task to your Cadet Portfolio, and make notes about what your life would be like without drills.

83

Steps from the Past Scoring Guide
Criteria
1. You describe the condition of the Continental Army prior to the establishment of drill
2. You explain who Baron Friedrich von Steuben was and what he did to establish drill in the Continental Army
3. You explain five purposes of drill in wartime and peacetime
4. You describe two examples of the role of drill in your daily life
5. Your skit, rap, poem or song engaged your audience
FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES

Ratings met not met met not met

met met met

not met not met not met

COMMUNICATE USING VERBAL, NON-VERBAL, VISUAL, AND WRITTEN
TECHNIQUES
5. You communicate accurately and clearly
Name _________________________________________

met

not met

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

84

Student Learning Plan
Unit 2: Leadership Theory and Application

Roles of Leaders and Followers in Drill [U2C2L2]

This lesson introduces you to the roles of leaders and followers in drill. It discusses the different types of commands and the importance of command voice. It prepares you for the practical application of drill in
Leadership Lab by explaining the responsibilities of a small unit (team or squad) drill leader. In
Leadership Lab, you will have the opportunity to demonstrate the traits of leadership, concepts of teamwork, pride in your unit, and the chain of command. In this learning plan you will examine the different types of commands used in drill. You will also practice using the characteristics of command voice.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Demonstrate effectual command voice in drill
Linked Core Abilities
Take responsibility for your actions and choices

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your competence:


by demonstrating proper drill commands and the use of command voice



by writing a short summary about the roles of leaders and followers

Your performance will be successful when:


you correctly identify and demonstrate a preparatory command and command of execution



you correctly identify and demonstrate a preparatory command, supplementary command, and command of execution as part of a formation



you properly demonstrate the characteristics of command voice: voice control; distinctiveness; and inflection



you describe three roles each of leaders and followers

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Describe the responsibilities of a follower and leader in drill
b. Identify the types of drill commands
c. Describe the elements of a proper command voice
d. Define key words: cadence, column, command of execution, inflection, interval, preparatory command, rhythmic, selfless, snap, supplementary command, tone

85

2

Roles of Leaders and Followers in Drill [U2C2L2]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

PREVIEW this learning plan including the competency, learning objectives, performance standards, core abilities, learning activities, and assessment activities. VIEW a video clip from a drill demonstration. LEARN ABOUT the roles of leaders and followers. CREATE a Double Bubble Map comparing and contrasting the characteristics of leaders and followers in JROTC and military units. PRESENT your Double
Bubble Maps to the class. [Work in teams of 3-6] RECORD your Double Bubble Maps and your responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 1 independently. SHARE your Double Bubble
Map with your instructor. RECORD your Double Bubble Map in your Cadet Notebook.

_____3.

VIEW a video about drill leader voice control. LEARN ABOUT the types of drill commands and the use of command voice. CREATE an appropriate Thinking Map® illustrating the sequence of assigned types of commands or parts of command voice. PRESENT your Thinking Map® to the class. [Work in teams of 3-6]
RECORD your Thinking Map®, notes and your responses to reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 3 independently. CREATE an appropriate
Thinking Map® for each type of command and the use of command voice. SHARE your Thinking
Maps with your instructor. RECORD your Thinking Maps® in your Cadet Notebook.

_____5.

OBSERVE a demonstration of commands and drill movements. PRACTICE designated commands and critique your peers. [Work in teams] RECORD your notes and responses to reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 5 with a senior cadet or your instructor.
RECORD your notes in your Cadet Notebook.

_____7.

OBTAIN the Role of Leaders and Followers in Drill Assessment Task and Scoring Guide from your instructor.
PARTICIPATE in leadership positions in drill formations. PRACTICE and critique commands in new groups. DEMONSTRATE proper drill commands and the correct use of command voice. EVALUATE peer cadets as they demonstrate drill commands. [Work in teams] RECORD your notes and responses to reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 7 with a senior cadet or your instructor.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

86

COMPLETE the Leaders and Followers in Drill Assessment Task. SELF-ASSESS and have peers assess your work using the scoring guide. SUBMIT your work to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] DEMONSTRATE the drill commands indicated in steps 1-3 and 6-8 in the scoring guide for your instructor. SELF-ASSESS your written summary using step 5 in the scoring guide. SUBMIT your work to your instructor for feedback and a grade.

Unit 2: Leadership Theory and Application

Roles of Leaders and Followers in Drill Assessment Task
[U2C2L2]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:
Demonstrate effectual command voice in drill
Linked Core Abilities

Take responsibility for your actions and choices

Directions
As you work through the lessons in Chapter 2: Leadership Skills, you will develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to be an active participant in drill. For this lesson assessment, you will participate in a group exercise demonstrating drill commands and write a short summary about the roles of leaders and followers. 1. Preview the criteria listed in the scoring guide to plan for your assessment.
2. Think about the different types of commands and the use of command voice you studied in this lesson.
3. Do not repeat a command given by the cadet or group before you.
4. Identify and demonstrate the correct drill command when directed.
5. Have peer or senior cadets assess your demonstration using the criteria detailed in steps 1-3 and 6-8 in the scoring guide.
6. Write a brief summary of the roles of leaders and followers. Give at least three examples of each.
7. Self-assess your work using the criteria detailed in step 5 in the scoring guide.
8. Submit your summary to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
Recommendation: Add this assessment task to your Cadet Portfolio, if desired.

87

Roles of Leaders and Followers in Drill Scoring Guide
Criteria
1. You correctly identify and demonstrate a preparatory command and command of execution
2. You correctly identify and demonstrate a preparatory command, supplementary command, and command of execution as part of a formation
3. You properly demonstrate the characteristics of command voice: voice control; distinctiveness; and inflection
4. You do not repeat the same command previously given by a cadet or group
5. You describe at least three roles each of leaders and followers
FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES
TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR ACTIONS AND CHOICES
6. You follow established policies and procedures
7. You develop and carry out strategies to make your personal skills and abilities more visible to an organization
8. You occasionally serve as a leader in groups
Name _________________________________________

Ratings met not met met not met

met

not met

met

not met

met

not met

met met not met not met

met

not met

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

88

Student Learning Plan
Unit 2: Leadership Theory and Application

Using Your Leadership Skills/Taking Charge [U2C2L3]

This lesson introduces you to how leaders use their leadership skills to prepare themselves for taking charge during drill. For leaders to command respect and obedience from their subordinates, they must be prepared to lead and ready for any situation. In this learning plan you will examine the strengths and weaknesses of leaders in drill and analyze some proven leadership techniques.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Analyze personal strengths and weaknesses as a drill leader
Linked Core Abilities
Take responsibility for your actions and choices

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your competence:


by participating in a role-play about the characteristics and responsibilities of drill leaders

Your performance will be successful when:


you demonstrate the five characteristics of a good drill leader



you demonstrate how a drill leader prepares for drill



you demonstrate the steps you would take to teach a drill

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Describe the preparation of a drill leader before a drill
b. Sequence the procedure a drill leader takes to teach a drill
c. Identify five characteristics of a capable drill leader
d. Define key words: command of execution, command voice, preparation, procedure

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson.
Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.

89

2

Using Your Leadership Skills/Taking Charge [U2C2L3]

_____1.

PREVIEW this learning plan including the competency, learning objectives, performance standards, core abilities, learning activities, and assessment activities. VIEW a video clip about a drill leader. CREATE a Tree Map or Matrix graphic organizer showing the leadership characteristics or task preparation of drill leaders before, during, and after challenges. SHARE your Tree Map with the class. [Work in teams] _____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 1 independently. SHARE your Tree Map or
Matrix graphic organizer with your instructor. RECORD your Tree Map in your Cadet Notebook.

_____3.

LEARN ABOUT characteristics of good drill leaders and what they do to prepare for and conduct drill.
CONSTRUCT a poster showing answers to an assigned topic about drill leaders. COMPARE your poster with your Tree Map or Matrix graphic organizer from Learning Activity 1. SHARE your poster with the class. [Work in teams]

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 3 independently. RECORD your poster in your
Cadet Notebook.

_____5.

READ a case study of a drill leader. CREATE a Multi-Flow Map or Fishbone of the actions of the drill leader prior to, during, and after a drill session. IDENTIFY the drill leader’s problem areas and possible solutions. EXPLAIN your Multi-Flow Map or Fishbone to the class. [Work in teams]

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 5 independently. RECORD your Multi-Flow
Map or Fishbone in your Cadet Notebook.

_____7.

OBTAIN the Using Your Leadership Skills/Taking Charge Assessment Task and Scoring Guide from your instructor. ANALYZE an assigned leadership scenario. BRAINSTORM possible solutions to a leadership problem. PARTICIPATE in a role-play that shows how to help a drill leader improve leadership characteristics.
[Work in teams]

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT the first two steps of Learning Activity 7 independently. RECORD your solutions to the leadership problems in your Cadet Notebook.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

90

COMPLETE the Using Leadership Skills/Taking Charge Assessment Task. SELF-ASSESS your work using the
Scoring Guide. SUBMIT your work to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Exercise 1: Scenarios
Directions: Read each scenario and discuss how each drill leader can improve his or her leadership characteristics. 1. Phil is a drill leader who yells at his squad when they do something wrong. He belittles them and is sarcastic to them.
2. Claudia is a drill leader who has favorite squad members. She tends to overlook mistakes made by her favorite squad members, but criticizes the other members when they make a mistake.
3. Juan is a drill leader who never listens to his squad members. If they make suggestions, he disregards them.
4. Linda is a drill leader who is frequently absent. When she does come to class, she is absent minded and not focuses on the task at hand.
5. John is a drill leader who teaches poorly. He rarely provides feedback to his squad.

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92

Unit 2: Leadership Theory and Application

Using Your Leadership Skills/Taking Charge Assessment
Task [U2C2L3]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:
Analyze personal strengths and weaknesses as a drill leader
Linked Core Abilities

Take responsibility for your actions and choices

Directions
As you work through the lessons in Chapter 2: Leadership Skills, you will develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to be a leader in drill. For this lesson assessment, you will demonstrate the characteristics and responsibilities of a drill leader through a role-play.
1. Preview the criteria listed in the scoring guide to plan for your assessment.
2. Think about the leadership examples that you studied in this lesson.
3. Prepare to write or participate in a role-play where you can demonstrate the characteristics and responsibilities of a role leader.
4. Self-assess your work using the criteria detailed in the scoring guide.
Recommendation: Add this assessment task to your Cadet Portfolio, and make notes about what you will do when you take charge of a drill unit.

93

Using Your Leadership Skills/Taking Charge Scoring Guide
Criteria
1. You demonstrate five characteristics of a good drill leader
2. You demonstrate how a drill leader prepares for drill
3. You demonstrate the steps you would take to teach a drill
FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES
TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR ACTIONS AND CHOICES
4. You follow established policies and procedures
5. You prepare, plan, and organize job responsibilities
Name _________________________________________

Ratings met not met met not met met not met

met met not met not met

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

94

Student Learning Plan
Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Self Awareness [U3C1L1]

You may notice that some people behave or conduct themselves like you and others behave quite differently. For example, one person may be very quiet and thoughtful while another may be the life of the party. In this learning plan you will identify your own behavior preferences and consider the preferences of others. This knowledge can help you to understand situations as they unfold, improve your communication with others, and influence people and situations to get the results you desire.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Determine your behavioral preferences
Linked Core Abilities
Build your capacity for life-long learning
Treat self and others with respect

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your competence:
G

by completing a Self-Awareness Matrix using the Winning Colors® behavior model

Your performance will be successful when:
G

you apply your Winning Colors® to a variety of situations

G

you rank the behaviors that you are most likely to exhibit in each situation from 1 (most likely) to 4 (least likely) G

you provide specific examples of how you would demonstrate each color in each situation

G

you select one situation and summarize how your preferred behaviors help or hinder that situation

G

you identify strategies for dealing with a situation more effectively by applying your knowledge of Winning
Colors®

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Explain the four clusters of behavior in the Winning Colors® framework
b. Illustrate your behavioral preferences using the four Winning Colors®
c. Identify strengths for each behavior cluster
d. Express appreciation for your own uniqueness
e. Define key words: assessment, cluster, differentiate, and introspection

95

2

Self Awareness [U3C1L1]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

THINK ABOUT the following questions: How do you interact with others socially to enjoy yourself?
How do you complete individual tasks or assignments? How do you deal with other people in a team or committee that has a job requiring teamwork? POST an example for each question in the Tree Map.
[Work with a small group of your peers]

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] WRITE out three or four examples in a Tree Map to answer each question.

_____3.

PARTICIPATE in a presentation about the Winning Colors behavioral clusters. LEARN MORE OR REVIEW the Self-Awareness section in your student text. DISCOVER your Winning Color and SHARE nuances about your preferences with a cadet partner. [Work with a partner]

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] READ the Self-Awareness section of the student text. DETERMINE your
Winning Color.

_____5.

COMPLETE Exercise #1: Discover Your Communication Power. [Work independently] PARTICIPATE IN or OBSERVE a role-play activity. CREATE a Tree Map to show how each participant in the role-play displays the colors. [Work with a small group of your peers] REFLECT on the results of the role-play activity. Did you see people get in a behavior preference and stay there, or move between several?
What do you think you would have done for the carnival committee? What does that say about your behavior preferences? ENTER your ideas in your Cadet Notebook.

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] IDENTIFY someone famous (dead or alive) who is a planner, adventurer, builder, or relater. WRITE a notebook entry to suggest why that person exhibits the behavior cluster identified.

_____7.

PARTICIPATE IN a presentation on the Quarterbacks of Life Stepping Stone to Success 2: Self-Esteem and its role in the self-awareness. LEARN MORE by reading the Stepping Stone 2: Self Esteem section in your student text. [Work independently] COMPLETE Exercise #2: Self-Esteem Tree Map Activity to check your comprehension about self-esteem.

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 7 independently.

_____9.

COMPLETE Exercise #3: Your Determinants of Self-Esteem and Success. [Work independently] ADD responses to the reflection questions to your Cadet Notebook.

_____10.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 9 independently.

_____11.

APPLY your Winning Colors to the situations presented in Exercise ##4: Self-Awareness Matrix. ACQUIRE the
#
Self-Awareness Assessment Task and the QBOL Stepping Stones to Success Scoring Guide. [Work independently]
ADD responses to the reflection questions to your Cadet Notebook.

_____12.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 11 independently.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

96

COMPLETE the Self-Awareness Assessment Task. SELF-ASSESS your work using the Self-Awareness
Scoring Guide. SUBMIT your Self-Awareness to your instructor for feedback and a grade. PLACE your completed Self-Awareness in your Cadet Portfolio.

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Exercise 1: Discover your Communication Power
®

Directions: In this exercise you will determine which of your Winning Colors are the strongest at the present time: planner, builder, relater, or adventurer. The four parts of self and your power to communicate reside in your ability to exhibit different behaviors in situations. Although everyone is comprised of each of the behaviors in diverse extents, the
®
goal of Winning Colors is to work to develop a balance between the four colors.
1. Start by numbering the following words or phrases in each item (a, b, c, d) from 1 to 4, moving horizontally across each row in order of importance to you. Number 1 would be the word or phrase that best describes your feelings of comfort and what you like inside – NOT how you would like to be – NOT how you act because of outside forces.
2. Total the vertical columns.
3. Circle the lowest score. Put a box around your second lowest score. Note: The lowest score identifies you present communication POWER or Winning Color. Your boxed score is your backup communication Power.
4. Read the next page of this exercise and then fill in the TREND blanks with the four parts of self that match the words in the column.
5. Next fill in the COLOR blanks with the color that matches the TREND based on the next page.

< 1=Most Important > < 2=Very Important > < 3=Somewhat Important > < 4=Least Important >

A

B

C

D

Being prepared

Let’s all be friends

Developing better and more logical ways

Living today and not worrying about tomorrow

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Telling people what they should do

Talking and socializing

Understanding and analyzing about tomorrow

Having fun and excitement with people

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Saving and budgeting

Giving

Creating

Spending

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Leading

Relating

Planning

Exploring

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Being Organized

Bring loved and accepted

Being correct and competent Being in spontaneous action

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

A Total: _____

B Total: _____

C Total: _____

D Total: _____

Trend: _______________

Trend: _______________

Trend: _______________

Trend: _______________

Color: _______________

Color: _______________

Color: _______________

Color: _______________

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Exercise adapted from Conflict Resolution Through Winning Colors ® used with permission by authors Stefan Neilson and Shay Thoelke ©1999.

97

Note: Make sure the phrases are numbered and the columns are totaled before going any further.
Directions: In your table on the previous page, fill in the appropriate trend word and corresponding color found below.
A.
B.
C.
D.

Under column A the TREND is Builder and the COLOR is Brown, representing leadership and decisiveness.
Under column B the TREND is Relater and the COLOR is Blue, showing openness and feeling.
Under column C the TREND is Planner and the COLOR is Green, containing deep, hidden, changing currents.
Under column D the TREND is Adventurer and the COLOR is Red, producing excitement, action and fun.
®

According to the creators of Winning Colors , the colors symbolize the four elements of life: Earth, Air, Water, and Fire.

98

Exercise 2: Self-Esteem Activity
Directions: Create a Tree Map (or T-chart) answering each of the following questions for the four determinants that impact self-esteem and success.

99

Exercise 3: Your Determinants of Self-Esteem and Success
Directions: Self-esteem and success are achieved when you connect with your goals by deriving power from using your personal resources. Conducting a Resource Review (audit) will help you to stay in touch with your resources, bolster your self-esteem, and contribute to your success in meeting your goals. This worksheet will help you to work through how the four (4) determinants of self-esteem and success relate to each other. *Read the example provided before beginning this activity.
Connection (My Goal)
______________________________________________________________________________
State the connection (goal) you wish to achieve.

My Resources (power tools)
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
Resource Review: Brainstorm the resources you have or will need to achieve your desired connection (goal).

Power
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
List the resources you will use that will give you the Power to connect with your goal.

Model (plan)
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Describe what resources you will use and how you will use them (your plan) to connect with your goal.

*Example: My goal is to connect with someone I want to meet, but do not know. The resources I will need are: listening skills, giving compliments, giving my name, sharing something about myself, smiling, facing the person, and maintaining eye contact. I will choose the following resources to use that will give me the power to connect with someone I do not know (give my name, share something about myself, maintain eye contact, and smile). My model (plan): I will walk up to the person I want to meet. I will offer a pleasant smile, catch the person’s attention. Wait for this person to stop what he/she is doing and face me. I will make eye contact, maintain my smile, offer my name and explain that I am new to the area and am interested in getting to know him/her. I will wait to receive this person’s name and then exchange information that will help each of us to know one another better.

100

Exercise 4: Self Awareness Matrix
®

Directions: In this exercise you will determine which of your Winning Colors are the strongest in different situations: planner, builder, relater, or adventurer.
1. Consider each situation on the left and decide which cluster(s) would dominate your behavior in each. Rank the colors you would exhibit in order from 1 (most likely) to 4 (least likely).
2. Record a brief example of something you would do or a way you might behave or feel that illustrates the most likely choices.

Situation

Green/Planner

Brown/Builder

Blue/Relater

Red/Adventurer

(think, fox)

(decide, bull & bear)

(feel, dolphin)

(act, tiger)

Rank:

Social
Activity

Example:

Example:

Example:

Rank:

Rank:

Rank:

Example:

Example:

Example:

Example:

Rank:

Rank:

Rank:

Example:

Example:

Example:

Example:

Rank:

Rank:

Rank:

Example:

Example:

Example:

Example:

Rank:

Doing a
Job

Example:

Rank:

Handling
Conflict

Rank:

Rank:

Doing
Homework

Rank:

Rank:

Family
Activity

Rank:

Rank:

Rank:

Rank:

Example:

Example:

Example:

Example:

Exercise adapted from Conflict Resolution Through Winning Colors ® used with permission by authors Stefan Neilson and Shay Thoelke ©1999.

101

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102

Exercise 5: Stepping Stone 2: Self-Esteem (Resource Review)
Directions: You are now ready to apply Stepping Stone 2: Self-Esteem (Resource Review) in a real life situation that you experience daily. Five days a week you go to school and sit in classrooms for several hours a day. Have you thought about why you are there and what you hope to accomplish in the hours you spend in school? You will be given a goal to attain using
Stepping Stone 2 as the focus of your work.

Your Goal: To demonstrate to all of my instructors that I am very serious about getting a good education and doing all that I can to achieve academic success in all subject areas.
Resource Review: Everything that you say, do, and think needs to be directed toward goal attainment. Ask yourself this question: How do I communicate to my instructors through my actions (verbal and nonverbal) that I am a serious minded student, intent on achieving academic success in all subject areas? Everything I do is a choice. I need to make sure that every choice I make takes me toward my goal and not away from it. Brainstorm the resources you have and will need to achieve your goal.

Practice: Using your resources to achieve your goal will increase your self-esteem and produce desired results (success). Indicate how, when, and where you will use the resources you listed in your Resource Review. Create a script that describes your action plan and the results you hope to attain with respect to your stated goal.

103

Opportunity: Identify new resources and look for additional ways in which you can achieve your goal. What other things can you do and learn that you did not include in your Resource Review or action plan script? For example, did you include the following resources: time management skills, study skills, asking questions, using nonverbal communication skills in class to demonstrate interest, and so on? List additional resources and things you can do to achieve your goal.

104

Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Self Awareness Matrix Assessment Task [U3C1L1]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:
Determine your behavioral preferences

Linked Core Abilities

Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques
Treat self and others with respect

Directions
For this assessment you will consider all that you've learned about self-awareness throughout this lesson.
Consider your Winning Colors and process for building self-esteem as a component of meeting a goal and moving forward toward success.

1. Complete the Exercise 4: Self-Awareness Matrix according to the instructions on the sheet.
2. Use the QBOL Stepping Stones to Success Self-Assessment to further develop your progress toward a goal or outline a goal and use the Self-Assessment as a guide for holding yourself accountable. Focus on the Stepping Stone #2: Self-Esteem.
3. Submit your completed Self-Awareness Matrix and Scoring Guide to your instructor for feedback and a grade. 4. Place your completed Self-Awareness Matrix in your Cadet Portfolio for future reference.

105

Self Awareness Matrix Scoring Guide
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

7.
8.

9.

Criteria
Ratings
you apply your Winning Colors to a variety of situations met not met you rank the behaviors that you are most likely to exhibit in met not met each situation from 1 (most likely) to 4 (least likely) you provide specific examples of how you would demonstrate met not met each color in each situation you select one situation and summarize how your preferred met not met behaviors help or hinder that situation you identify strategies for dealing with a situation more met not met effectively by applying your knowledge of Winning Colors
Matrix is complete, clear and legible met not met
FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
BUILD YOUR CAPACITY FOR LIFE-LONG LEARNING you assess personal learning styles and preferences and apply met not met this knowledge to the learning process you recognize and examine the underlying assumptions of met not met one's own beliefs
TREAT SELF AND OTHERS WITH RESPECT you work well with individuals and groups from diverse met not met backgrounds Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

106

Stepping Stones to Success Self-Assessment
Directions

Use this scoring guide to hold yourself accountable to attaining your goals. Create several copies of this and use it over and again and move from developing skill level to a fully achieved skill level. The Stepping Stones to Success Self-Assessment can be used anytime during your JROTC education.

Scoring Guide
Criteria

Ratings

STEPPING STONE ONE: DREAMS AND GOALS
1.

You state (verbal/written) the definitions for dreams and goals

2.

You state the similarities and differences between dreams and goals

3.

You explain how dreams and goals contribute to your success

4.

You explain how to turn dreams into goals

developing almost achieved fully achieved developing almost achieved fully achieved developing almost achieved fully achieved developing almost achieved fully achieved

STEPPING STONE TWO: SELF-ESTEEM (RESOURCE REVIEW)
5.

You state (V/W) the definition of self-esteem

6.

You explain how self-esteem contributes to success

7.

You conduct a personal resource review

8.

You explain how using your personal and environmental resources contribute to goal attainment

developing almost achieved fully achieved developing almost achieved fully achieved developing almost achieved fully achieved developing almost achieved fully achieved

STEPPING STONE THREE: TEAM SUPPORT
10. You state (V/W) the definition for team support
11. You explain how team support contributes to success
12. You give examples of strategies you can use to develop team support

developing almost achieved fully achieved developing almost achieved fully achieved developing almost achieved fully achieved

STEPPING STONE FOUR: DECIDE AND PLAN
13. You state (V/W) the definitions for decide and plan
14. You explain (V/W) how decide and plan processes work together to achieve success
15. You use decide and plan processes in a classroom experience

developing almost achieved fully achieved developing almost achieved fully achieved developing almost achieved fully achieved

STEPPING STONE FIVE: POSITIVE MENTAL ATTITUDE
16. You state (V/W) the definition for positive mental attitude (PMA)
17. You explain (V/W) how having PMA contributes to achieving success
18. You name a variety of PMA strategies that support achieving success
19. You practice using PMA strategies

developing almost achieved fully achieved developing almost achieved fully achieved developing almost achieved fully achieved developing almost achieved fully achieved

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108

Student Learning Plan
Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Appreciating Diversity Through Winning Colors
[U3C1L2]

Understanding yourself is an important aspect of creating a successful and happy life. It is also important to develop your awareness of others and to become sensitive to the differences and similarities between people. In this learning plan you will explore the similarities and differences between yourself and others and the value of diversity to working as a team.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Apply an appreciation of diversity to interpersonal situations
Linked Core Abilities
Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques
Treat self and others with respect

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your competence:
G

by writing an Appreciating Diversity Reflection

Your performance will be successful when:
G

you identify the strongest Winning Colors® for each person in a group or team that you belong to

G

reflection summarizes the similarities and differences between the members of the group according to their Winning Colors

G

reflection identifies at least one strength that each person (including you) brings to the group that would be valuable in working as a team to solve problems or accomplish goals

G

reflection summarizes the value of diversity in working as a group

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Identify key characteristics for each Winning Colors® behavior cluster: Builders, Planners, Adventurers, and Relaters
b. Determine factors that impact the behavior of others
c. Determine factors that impact how others perceive your behavior
d. Select behaviors that promote success in a variety of situations
e. Define key words: comfort zone, natural, and preference

109

2

Appreciating Diversity Through Winning Colors [U3C1L2]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

ASSOCIATE a stated behavior preference with its related Winning Color. NOTE any differences between the color that best identifies you to the number of times you changed colors for the given statement.
DISCUSS how many times you moved around and how many times your peers moved around. CONSIDER how various circumstances require that we look toward others' ability to work within a group. [Work with a group of your peers]

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] COMPLETE Exercise #1: Human Graph Activity. SUMMARIZE what you learn about yourself in your Cadet Notebook.

_____3.

PREVIEW the student learning plan including the learning objectives and key words, performance standards, and learning activities. LISTEN TO and OBSERVE a briefing about the three awareness-enhancing behaviors: introspection, observation, and feedback. LEARN MORE OR REVIEW by reading the Appreciating Diversity
Through Winning Colors® section of the student text. ANSWER the review questions at the end of the section.
SHARE examples of the three awareness-enhancing behaviors you have found helpful in enhancing your awareness of yourself and others. WRITE your examples in a Tree Map under the column for each behavior.
[Work with a small group of your peers] SHARE your findings with others in the class. COMPLETE sentences that consider why people with differing behavioral preferences are important in moving you and others on a team toward their goal. [Work with the entire class] ADD responses to the reflection questions to your Cadet
Notebook. [Work independently]

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] COMPLETE Learning Activity 3 independently.

_____5.

OBSERVE a presentation on Winning Colors®Power Words. [Work with entire class] DEVELOP a personal ad about yourself using information you've learned about yourself including the types of people you work best with and why. [Work independently] PROVIDE feedback to at least one other cadet's personal ad. SHOW that you appreciate the diversity of their behavior preference through the comments you provide them.
[Work with a partner] ADD responses to the reflection questions to your Cadet Notebook.

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] COMPLETE Exercise #2: Personal Ad. SHARE your personal ad with your instructor and ASK for feedback.

_____7.

BRAINSTORM real-life situations that require problem solving, conflict resolution, or goal attainment.
RECOMMEND effective behaviors for each situation using Winning Colors®. [Work with a small group of your peers] OBTAIN and REVIEW the Appreciating Diversity Through Winning Colors® Performance
Assessment Task. [Work independently]

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] WRITE an entry in your Cadet Notebook about how you might behave in that situation. What Winning Colors‚ behaviors would you normally display? What behaviors would create a desirable outcome?

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned that target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

110

COMPLETE the Appreciating Diversity Through Winning Colors® Assessment Task. SELF-ASSESS your work using the attached Scoring Guide. SUBMIT your assessment task to your instructor for feedback and a grade. PLACE your completed reflection in your Cadet Portfolio.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Exercise 1: Human Graph Activity
Directions (Self-paced Option): Read each sentence stem and the phrases that complete them. Under each sentence stem, circle the behavior that most describes you. When you are finished, determine which behavior you most often exhibit and least often exhibit. Write a summary in your notebooks about your Winning Colors behaviors.

1. When I communicate, I am most likely to:
• Want to be taken seriously and focus on the thinking behind the talk (planner)
• Take a bottom-line approach and focus on the results (builder)
• Want people to connect with me and be friendly (relater)
• Take a light-hearted approach and focus on fun (adventurer)
2. When there are things to get done, I am most likely to:
• Be duty-conscious and follow rules and directions (builder)
• Talk with others and find ways to help out (relater)
• Take action (adventurer)
• Be prepared with details and new ways of doing things (planner)
3. When others communicate with me, I prefer them to:
• Show genuine concern, share feelings, and be honest (relater)
• Be creative and express ideas (planner)
• Be concrete and to the point, forget the theory and long explanations (adventurer)
• Use a strong, short-idea approach and cool the emotions (builder)
4. My teacher or supervisor at work could help me stay on track by:
• Giving me exciting or challenging tasks with quick turnaround times (adventurer)
• Being a good listener or sounding board (planner)
• Being on top of things themselves and treating me properly (builder)
• Giving me people-centered assignments (relater)
5. When my plans affect others, I’m likely to:
• Support my ideas in a detailed fashion with in-depth explanations (planner)
• Want to get going and explain later, only if necessary (adventurer)
• Give step-by-step explanations of how the plan will be carried out (builder)
• Think about how my plans affect people and how they might react (relater)
6. If I’m in a group trying to work together, I really prefer people to:
• Thank each other for contributions and help each other (relater)
• Know the hierarchy of command and give it recognition (builder)
• Be logical and appreciate ideas (planner)
• Be spontaneous and have a sense of humor (adventurer)

111

Exercise 2: Personal Ad
Directions: As individuals, you have to sell yourself based on who you are. You are looking for a job, a date, or to join a team. Draw from the list of Winning
®
Colors power words and write a personal ad that is: personal, positive, includes emotion, and is in the present tense. Provide specific behavioral examples to support your analysis.

Builder Power Words

Changing
Improving
Being my best
Dreaming
Inner Life
Thinking
Inventing
Knowing More
Exactness
Planning
Revolution
Knowing the Future
Freedom of Thought

Leader
Powerful
Decisive
Results-oriented
Responsible
Tradition
Duty
Money
Preparation
Achievement
Expectation
Accomplishments
Structured

Relater Power Words

Adventurer Power Words

Friendly
Romantic
Loyal
Kind
Attentive
Thoughtful
Affectionate
Work together
Understanding
Considerate
Appreciative
Dependable
Aware

112

Planner Power Words

Action-oriented
Fun-loving
Brave
Bold
Spontaneous
React quickly
Mover and shaker
High energy
Challenging
Freedom
Quick thinker
Test the limits
Out of bounds

Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Appreciating Diversity Through Winning Colors®
Assessment Task [U3C1L2]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:
Apply an appreciation of diversity to interpersonal situations
Linked Core Abilities

Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques
Treat self and others with respect

Directions
For this Assessment Task you will write an Appreciating Diversity Reflection.
1. Think about a team or group that you are a member of and identify the strongest Winning Color of each person in the team. (If you wish, consider the Personal Ads developed by the members of your team earlier in this Learning Plan.)
2. Write a reflection about the similarities and differences between the members of your team and the value of diversity to solving problems and accomplishing team goals.
3. Check your work using the criteria detailed in the Appreciating Diversity Reflection Scoring Guide.
4. Submit your reflection to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
5. Place your reflection in your Cadet Portfolio if desired.

113

Appreciating Diversity Through Winning Colors® Scoring Guide
Criteria
Ratings
1. You identify the strongest Winning Colors for each person in met not met a group or team that you belong to
2. Reflection summarizes the similarities and differences met not met between the members of the group according to their Winning
Colors
3. Reflection identifies at least one strength that each person met not met
(including you) brings to the group that would be valuable in working as a team to solve problems or accomplish goals
4. Reflection summarizes the value of diversity in working as a met not met group FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
TREAT SELF AND OTHERS WITH RESPECT
5. You act with a sense of equity met not met
6. You work well with individuals and groups from diverse met not met backgrounds 7. You display an appreciation of diverse perspectives met not met
8. You value individual and cultural differences met not met
COMMUNICATE USING VERBAL, NON-VERBAL, VISUAL AND WRITTEN TECHNIQUES
9. You speak and write clearly so others can understand met not met
10. You interpret nonverbal communications met not met

Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

114

Student Learning Plan
Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Personal Growth Plan [U3C1L3]

Do you want to make more money, have better relationships, be the life of the party, start a new career, or just lose a few pounds? What do you need to do to accomplish your objective? You’ve probably heard words to this affect: “If you don’t know where you’re going, any road can lead you there.” Likewise, if you don’t know where you are, how do you know which road to choose?

Let 1

Why this is important:

Most of the success-oriented products being marketed today focus on the goal and tell you how to get there. These programs assume that if you “do as they do” you will be successful, too. The problem with this approach is that they don’t know you. They don’t know where you are today, so how can they give you directions to where you want to go? In this learning plan you will determine what personal skills you need to develop to be successful in reaching your goals.

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Develop a plan for personal growth
Linked Core Abilities
Build your capacity for life-long learning

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your competence:


by creating a Personal Growth Plan

Your performance will be successful when:


Personal Growth Plan charts your Key Emotional Skills by Skill Dimension according to the levels provided



Personal Growth Plan details the skills that you are targeting for improvement



Personal Growth Plan lists the resources and activities you will use to help your skill development



Personal Growth Plan summarizes how you will record your progress



Personal Growth Plan describes how and when you will assess your improvement at the end of the time period Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Assess key emotional skills to the relevant skill dimensions
b. Develop strategies for growth in two emotional skill areas
c. Plan self-directed development activities
d. Define key words: adaptability, assertion, change orientation, deference, emotional intelligence, intrapersonal, persistence

115

2

Personal Growth Plan [U3C1L3]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

BRAINSTORM the factors that impact a person’s ability to get and keep a job. [Work with the class]

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 1 independently.

_____3.

LISTEN TO and OBSERVE a briefing about personal success. LEARN MORE OR REVIEW by reading the Personal Growth Plan section in your student text. ANSWER the review questions at the end of the section. CREATE Identity Cards for each key emotional skill. [Work in a small group]

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] READ student text. ANSWER the review questions at the end of the section.
CREATE Identity Cards for each key emotional skill.

_____5.

COMPLETE the Personal Skills Map. [Work independently]

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 5 independently.

_____7.

PARTICIPATE in developing an “emotional skills barometer” for the class. [Work with the class]

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CREATE an “emotional skills barometer” in your Cadet Notebook illustrating how you will track your progress in developing your emotional intelligence.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

116

COMPLETE the Personal Growth Plan Assessment Task. SELF-ASSESS your work using the Scoring
Guide. SUBMIT your plan to your instructor for feedback and a grade. PLACE your completed plan in your Cadet Portfolio.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Handout 1: The Turnover Process

Companies hire based on Reasons 1 and 2, and then lose people by turnover or firing through Reason 3.

REASON 1

REASON 2

REASON 3

Smile

Education

Commitment

Dress

Credentials

Motivation

Looks

Certificates

Adaptability

Communication
Skills

Training

Behavior
Problems

Manners
Interests

Knowledge
Attitudes
Acquired Skills
Maturity
Experience
Stress
Management

Goals

Persistence

SUPERFICIAL

KNOWLEDGE &
EXPERIENCE

EMOTIONAL
INTELLIGENCE

117

Personal Growth Plan Worksheet
Directions: Chart your skills on the rubric below. Then complete the following sections to create a plan for skill growth.

Skill Dimension 1:
Intrapersonal Skills

Develop
(0-40 pts.)

Strengthen
(41-60 pts.)

Enhance
(61-100 pts.)

Low

Key Emotional Skills By Skill Dimension

Normal

High

Self Esteem
Interpersonal Assertion

Skill Dimension 2:
Interpersonal Skills

Interpersonal Awareness
Empathy
Drive Strength/Motivation
Decision Making

Skill Dimension 3:
Career/Life Skills

Time Management
Sales Orientation/Leadership
Commitment Ethic

Skill Dimension 4:
Personal Wellness Skills

Skill Dimension 5:
Problematic Behavior

Stress Management
Physical Wellness

Interpersonal Aggression
Interpersonal Deference
Personal Change Orientation

1. What skill(s) are you targeting for improvement?
2. What is the time period to show improvement?
3. What resources and learning activities can help your skill development?

4. How will you assess yourself?
5. Create a personal growth plan in your notebooks to record activities and skill development on an ongoing basis. Include the following elements for each entry: date, situation, skill affected, current rating, and similarities and differences between current behavior (or skill set) and behavior in previous situations.

118

Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Personal Growth Plan Assessment Task [U3C1L3]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:
Develop a plan for personal growth
Linked Core Abilities

Build your capacity for life-long learning

Directions
For this assessment task you will create a Personal Growth Plan.
1. Think about the results of your Personal Skills Map and what you have about emotional intelligence.
2. Complete the Personal Growth Plan worksheet.
3. Check your work using the criteria detailed in the Personal Growth Plan Scoring Guide.
4. Submit your Personal Growth Plan to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
5. Place your Personal Growth Plan in your Cadet Portfolio if desired.

119

Personal Growth Plan Scoring Guide
Criteria
Ratings
1. Personal Growth Plan charts your Key met not met
Emotional Skills by Skill Dimension according to the levels provided
2. Personal Growth Plan details the skills that you met not met are targeting for improvement
3. Personal Growth Plan lists the resources and met not met activities you will use to help your skill development 4. Personal Growth Plan summarizes how you will met not met record your progress
5. Personal Growth Plan describes how and when met not met you will assess your improvement at the end of the time period
FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
BUILD YOUR CAPACITY FOR LIFE-LONG LEARNING
6. You recognize and examine the underlying met not met assumptions of your own beliefs
7. You access available resources for personal and met not met professional growth

Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

120

Student Learning Plan
Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Becoming an Active Learner [U3C1L4]

Active learners do not wait for learning to happen — they make it happen. You learned to crawl, to stand up, to walk, and many other things because you wanted to learn them. This desire to learn something made you ask the people around you for help. Active learning is an instinct with which you were born. In this learning plan you will discover your active learning strengths and weaknesses. You will also learn how to improve your thinking and learning skills to become a more effective learner.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Determine the thinking/learning skills necessary for improving active learning
Linked Core Abilities
Build your capacity for life-long learning
Apply critical thinking techniques

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your competence:
G

by creating an Active Learning Action Plan

Your performance will be successful when:
G

Action Plan describes how your personal behavior or characteristics have impacted how you learn and think G

Action Plan details the thinking/learning behaviors that you are targeting for improvement

G

Action Plan list specific strategies for improving your personal behavior or characteristics to become a more active learner

G

Action Plan lists the resources and activities you will use to help your skill development

G

Action Plan summarizes how you will record your progress

G

Action Plan describes how and when you will assess your improvement

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Identify the thinking types and related viewpoints necessary to address typical active learner questions
b. Distinguish between traits and activities of critical and creative thinkers
c. Differentiate between objective and subjective thinking
d. Distinguish between active learner and passive learner traits
e. Define key words: active, classify, creative, critical, generalize, objective, passive, predict, subjective, visualize 121

2

Becoming an Active Learner [U3C1L4]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

CREATE a Double Bubble Map for each pair of learner/thinker opposites: active learners/passive learners, critical thinkers/creative thinkers, and objective viewpoint/subjective viewpoint. [Work with a small group]

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 1 independently.

_____3.

LISTEN TO and OBSERVE a briefing about Active Learning. LEARN MORE OR REVIEW by reading the Becoming an Active Learner section in your student text. WRITE a definition of each term
(active learner, passive learner, creative thinker, critical thinker, objective viewpoint and subjective viewpoint) and POST it on the wall next to the appropriate half of the Double Bubble Map. [Work with a small group] ANSWER the review questions at the end of the section.

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 3 independently.

_____5.

PLAY the Learner-Types Game. [Work in teams of 3-6 cadets]

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] THINK of a scenario from school or life that illustrates how each of the six learning/thinking behaviors could be helpful or useful. WRITE your scenarios in your Cadet Notebook.

_____7.

COMPLETE Exercise #1: Asking Questions. [Work individually]

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 7 independently.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

122

COMPLETE the Becoming an Active Learner Assessment Task. SELF-ASSESS your work using the
Scoring Guide. SUBMIT your plan to your instructor for feedback and a grade. PLACE your completed
Action Plan in your Cadet Portfolio.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

123

Three Question Types

• What is the evidence or proof?

• What are the facts?

Critical thinking

Related
Thinking Type
Objective

Related
Viewpoint
Facts form the basis of most of your studies.

Notes

Your Notes

Your name
Today’s date
Carefully read the article your instructor provided.
In the column labeled “Your Notes,” answer each of the questions from the “Three Question Types” column.
Be certain that you apply the “Related Thinking Type” and the “Related Viewpoint” when you answer each of the questions.
The column labeled “Notes” should help you determine what to use to answer the questions.

What?

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Directions:

Exercise 1: Asking Questions

124

• How do the facts link to other information I have?

• What can I do with the information now that I have the facts?

Now what?

• What else do I need to know?

• What conclusion can I draw?

• What do the facts mean?

So what?

Three Question Types

Creative thinking Creative thinking and
Critical thinking

Related
Thinking Type

Subjective

Subjective and
Creative

Related
Viewpoint

Use the information to form a pattern or structure on which to build other facts.

Use the facts to form an opinion.

Notes

Your Notes

Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Active Learning Action Plan Assessment Task [U3C1L4]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities
Determine the thinking/learning skills necessary for improving active learning
Linked Core Abilities

Build your capacity for life-long learning
Apply critical thinking techniques

Directions
For this Assessment Task you will create an Active Learning Action Plan.
1. Think about what you have learned in this learning plan about thinking and learning behaviors.
2. Complete the Active Learning Action Plan worksheet.
3. Check your work using the criteria detailed in the Action Plan Scoring Guide.
4. Submit your Active Learning Action Plan to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
5. Place your Active Learning Action Plan in your Cadet Portfolio if desired.

125

Active Learning Action Plan Scoring Guide
Criteria
Ratings
1. Action Plan describes how your personal met not met behavior or characteristics have impacted how you learn and think
2. Action Plan details the thinking/learning met not met behaviors that you are targeting for improvement
3. Action Plan list specific strategies for improving met not met your personal behavior or characteristics to become a more active learner
4. Action Plan lists the resources and activities you met not met will use to help your skill development
5. Action Plan summarizes how you will record met not met your progress
6. Action Plan describes how and when you will met not met assess your improvement
FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
BUILD YOUR CAPACITY FOR LIFE-LONG LEARNING
7. You assess personal learning styles and met not met preferences and apply this knowledge to the learning process
APPLY CRITICAL THINKING TECHNIQUES
8. You assess feedback from others met not met
9. You refine action plans based on evaluation of met not met feedback Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

126

Student Learning Plan
Unit 3: Foundations for Success
Pathway to Success (using the Quarterbacks of Life
Student Mentoring Program) [U3C1L5]
Let 1

Why this is important:
Success is a word that means different things to different people. How you define success will have a significant impact on how you view yourself, what you do, and how you achieve it in school and life.
In this lesson, you will explore the meaning of success, obstacles to success and some ways in which you can challenge these obstacles. Through interaction, reflection and team work you will examine the Quarterbacks of Life Student Mentoring Program’s Stepping Stones to Success model for achieving success, using the process to help develop a plan to achieve your own goals and dreams in life. What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Explore the process for defining success in your life
Linked Core Abilities
Build your capacity for life-long learning
Take responsibility for your actions and choices
Apply critical thinking techniques

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will show that you have learned the target knowledge and skills:


by using the Quarterbacks of Life Student Mentoring Program’s Five Stepping Stones to
Success process to develop a plan for your own success

Your performance will be successful when:
STEPPING STONE ONE: DREAMS AND GOALS

You state (verbal/written) the definitions for dreams and goals

You state the similarities and differences between dreams and goals

You explain how dreams and goals contribute to your success

You explain how to turn dreams into goal
STEPPING STONE THREE: TEAM SUPPORT

You state (V/W) the definition for team support

You explain how team support contributes to success •
You give examples of strategies you can use to develop team support

STEPPING STONE TWO: SELF-ESTEEM (RESOURCE
REVIEW)

You state (V/W) the definition of self-esteem

You explain how self-esteem contributes to success •
You conduct a personal resource review

You explain how using your personal and environmental resources contribute to goal attainment STEPPING STONE FOUR: DECIDE AND PLAN

You state (V/W) the definitions for decide and plan

You explain (V/W) how decide and plan processes work together to achieve success

You use decide and plan processes in a classroom experience 127

Pathway to Success (using the Quarterbacks of Life Student Mentoring Program) [U3C1L5]






STEPPING STONE FIVE: POSITIVE MENTAL ATTITUDE
You state (V/W) the definition for positive mental attitude (PMA)
You explain (V/W) how having PMA contributes to achieving success
You name a variety of PMA strategies that support achieving success
You practice using PMA strategies

Knowledge and skills you learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Analyze how success impacts your life
b. Examine parameters that impede success
c. Develop a definition of success for you
d. Identify the core elements of success
e. Associate self-esteem to achieving success
f. Explore how working with others can help you achieve your own goals of success
g. Relate the role of decision-making as essential in moving toward your goals of success
h. Explore the techniques for assuring a personal positive mental attitude and self-encouragement
i. Analyze how movement toward success is essential to life-long learning
j. Define key words: Dreams, Quarterback’s of Life (QBOL), Self-improvement, Stepping Stones to Success,
Success, Success Stoppers

Learning Activities

These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
____1. CHART a possible pathway to success for Bethany Hamilton using a Flow Map. [Work with class]
FAMILIARIZE YOURSELF with the Quarterbacks of Life Student Mentoring Program.
PARTICIPATE in a discussion on the types of 'road blocks' and the Success Stoppers that get in the way of reaching our goals and may have impacted her pathway toward success as well. [Work with class] For each of the boxes on the class flow map, CHART types of invisible, environment and imaginary Success Stoppers that Bethany Hamilton may have encountered along the way. [Work in teams] ADD your responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.
____2. [SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 1 independently.
____3. PARTICIPATE in a presentation on the Quarterbacks of Life Student Mentoring Program’s Stepping
Stones to Success model. [Work with class] COMPLETE Exercise ##2: Quarterbacks of Life: Stepping
Stones to Success as you review the presentation. [Work with a partner] DEVELOP a 'Stone
Success' Poster that explains the what, why and how for their assigned portion of the program.
[Work in teams] Prepare to PRESENT your “Stone Success” Poster to others in the class.
____4. [SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 3 independently.
____5. OBSERVE a presentation on how to move through the Pathway to Success and USE the model for an assigned team goal. USE a Flow Map to develop a Pathway to Success for your goal. PREPARE to share your team's response to the forward movement of each Stepping Stone with others in your class. [Work in teams] PARTICIPATE in a discussion on each Stepping Stone. COMPARE team work to recognize the ways people move toward goals - even similar goals. [Work as a class] ADD your responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.
____6. [SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 5 independently.

Assessment Activities:

These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
____1. OBTAIN the Pathway to Success Assessment Task and Scoring Guide. Begin to DEVELOP your
Pathway for Success using the Quarterbacks of Life Student Mentoring Stepping Stones model.
ADD your responses to the reflection questions to your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]
____2. [SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

128

Exercise 1: STEPPING STONES TO SUCCESS
Worksheet
Directions: Consider your own dreams and goals and complete the worksheet to the best of your ability, knowing that using the Quarterbacks of Life Student Mentoring Program’s Stepping
Stones to Success is a life-long learning process.

Stepping Stone One: Dreams & Goals
My Dream:
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
My Goal:
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
Why is this goal important to me?
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
What could keep me from achieving my goal (Success Stoppers)?
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________

129

Stepping Stone Two: Self-Esteem (Resource Review)
What resources (information, skills, time, materials, equipment, etc.) will I need to achieve my goal? ____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________

Stepping Stone Three: Team Support
Who are the people who can help me achieve my goal? What kind of help do I need?
Names of People

Help they can provide

____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________

130

Stepping Stone Four: Decide & Plan
Use the back of this page for Stepping Stone Four.
Decide
List potential Success Stoppers and what you will do to address them.
1.
2.
3.

List the resources you need and how you will obtain them.
1.
2.
3.

Brainstorm a list of things you need to do to achieve your goal.
1.
2.
3.

131

Plan
(Create a plan to follow using the information you have collected)
Sequence your steps in the order you will take them.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Provide the necessary details to implement each step.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Set beginning and ending dates for each step.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

132

Review your plan.
My plan is doable
My plan is observable
My plan is measurable
My plan is helpful
My plan is risk tolerable

Evaluate:
1. Did I follow my plan?

2. What worked and what did not?

3. What did I learn about myself?

4. What did I learn about my goal, and the Stepping Stones to Success?

*Note: Never risk more than you can afford to lose and do not risk a lot for a little.

133

Stepping Stone Five: Positive Mental Attitude
Positive Mental Attitude (Create a plan to stay positive while working on your goal)

Identify potential Success Stoppers on your road to success.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Create a PMA plan you will use to stay focused, energized, and positive.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

134

Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Pathway to Success (QBOL) [U3C1L5]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:
Explore the process for defining success in your life

Linked Core Abilities

Build your capacity for life-long learning
Take responsibility for your actions and choices
Apply critical thinking techniques

Directions
For this performance assessment task you will develop a plan for achieving a goal or dream of your own.
You can develop this plan as a paper, a graphic organizer or Thinking Map, or a PowerPoint. Use the five steps outlined in the Quarterbacks of Life Stepping Stones to Success Process and the Exercise 1:
Stepping Stones to Success Worksheet to assist you.
The attached scoring guide will provide criteria you can use to develop this first plan. Consider using these criteria to evaluate your goal planning throughout the JROTC program or even in life. You will be referred to this checklist in other areas of the JROTC curriculum. Prepare to present your Stepping Stones to Success project to others as directed by your instructor. Place your completed task in your Cadet
Portfolio.

135

Pathway to Success Scoring Guide
Criteria
STEPPING STONE ONE: DREAMS AND GOALS
1.
You state (verbal/written) the definitions for dreams and goals
2.
You state the similarities and differences between dreams and goals 3.
You explain how dreams and goals contribute to your success
4.
You explain how to turn dreams into goals
STEPPING STONE TWO: SELF-ESTEEM (RESOURCE REVIEW)
7.
You state (V/W) the definition of self-esteem
6.
You explain how self-esteem contributes to success
7.
You conduct a personal resource review
8.
You explain how using your personal and environmental resources contribute to goal attainment
STEPPING STONE THREE: TEAM SUPPORT
9.
You state (V/W) the definition for team support
10. You explain how team support contributes to success
11. You give examples of strategies you can use to develop team support STEPPING STONE FOUR: DECIDE AND PLAN
12. You state (V/W) the definitions for decide and plan
13. You explain (V/W) how decide and plan processes work together to achieve success
14. You use decide and plan processes in a classroom experience
STEPPING STONE FIVE: POSITIVE MENTAL ATTITUDE
15. You state (V/W) the definition for positive mental attitude
(PMA)
16. You explain (V/W) how having PMA contributes to achieving success 17. You name a variety of PMA strategies that support achieving success 18. You practice using PMA strategies
Name _________________________________________

Ratings complete complete

not complete not complete

complete complete not complete not complete

complete complete complete complete not complete not complete not complete not complete

complete complete complete

not complete not complete not complete

complete complete not complete not complete

complete

not complete

complete

not complete

complete

not complete

complete

not complete

complete

not complete

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

136

Student Learning Plan
Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Brain Structure and Function [U3C2L1]

Many people never totally discover or exert the full potential of their brain. It’s structure and function is an amazing part of human anatomy. In this learning plan you will explore current research on the structure of the brain and how it work. You will learn practical ways to apply complex concepts that can help put you in control of your own mind.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Relate the structure and function of the brain to the learning process
Linked Core Abilities
Build your capacity for life-long learning
Apply critical thinking techniques

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will show that you have learned the target knowledge and skills:


by creating a jigsaw puzzle of the brain

Your performance will be successful when:


puzzle is divided into major regions of the brain



puzzle labeling includes key words used in the learning plan



puzzle includes functions of each brain region



puzzle relates an external stimulus or activity to the region of the brain it affects

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Identify key areas and function of the midbrain/limbic system
b. Associate major regions of the brain to their functions
c. Explain the function of a neuron
d. Explain the three elements involved in transmitting stimulus from outside the body to the brain
e. Assess the process required to enhance brain power
f. Define Key Words: axon, brain stem, cerebral hemisphere, cortex, dendrite, Limbic System, neural plasticity, neurons, neurotransmitter, sensory flooding, sensory gating, synapse

137

2

Brain Structure and Function [U3C2L1]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

VIEW Video #1: Brain Topics. THINK ABOUT how parts of your physical body and brain transmits information. CONSIDER the phrases “brain evolution”, “the five senses”, “the nervous system”, “emotions and the brain”, and “memory”. DETERMINE what you know or would like to know about these phrases by adding to a KWL Chart. SHARE your contributions to the KWL Chart with others in the class.
[Work with a team of 3-6 cadets] ADD responses to the reflection questions to your Cadet Notebook.

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] DRAW and LABEL a picture of the brain in your Cadet Notebook and ADD what you already know and would like to know about the brain.

_____3.

VIEW “Presenting Brain Structures and Functions” video featured in the Quantum Learning CD-ROM.
CONSIDER the five concepts presented in the video: “Evolution and Major Brain Areas”, “Sensory
Systems and the Cerebral Cortex”, “Nerve Cells and the Nervous System”, “Limbic System and Emotion”, and “Memory Systems”. LEARN MORE about one of the structures and functions of the brain by reading Exercise #1: Brain Summary and the Brain Structure and Function section in your student text.
CREATE a Tree Map to classify the key points of an assigned section of reading. [Work with a team of 3-6 cadets] SHARE your information with others in the class. ANSWER the review questions at the end of the section. ADD responses to the reflection questions to your Cadet Notebook.

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] READ Exercise #1: Brain Summary and the Brain Structure and Function section in your student text. ANSWER the review questions at the end of the chapter section.

_____5.

CREATE on large index cards visual aid, graphic organizer or Thinking Map of your choice to include at least one piece of information about the brain, two pieces of information about the nervous system and three pieces of information about body’s sensory system. [Work with a partner] PRESENT your information to others in the class. PREVIEW others’ work and make suggestions for improvement or clarification. REVISE or CLARIFY your own information as necessary. ADD responses to the reflection questions to your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CREATE a “Brain Structure and Function” Thinking Map of your choice describing the one piece of information about the brain, two pieces of information about the nervous system and three pieces of information about the body’s sensory system.

_____7.

PLAY a game using the index card maps created in Learning Activity 7. RANDOMLY SELECT cards and explain to others the brain structure and function. ROTATE cards to PROVIDE you an opportunity to explain a variety of attributes of the brain and related systems. CONTINUE rotating cards until everyone in your team has had an opportunity to explain one of the cards. [Work with a team of 3-6 cadets]
ADD responses to the reflection questions to your cadet notebooks. OBTAIN the Brain Structure and
Function Assessment Task and Scoring Guide. [Work independently]

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CREATE a 5-piece jigsaw puzzle of the brain. LABEL the part of the brain on one side and list the structure’s function on the other. OBTAIN the Brain Structure and Function Assessment
Task and Scoring Guide.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.
_____2.

138

COMPLETE the Brain Structure and Function Assessment Task. USE the Scoring Guide to self assess your work and SUBMIT your completed assessment to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Exercise 1: Brain Summary
1. Evolution and Major Brain Areas
• The major brain areas or the Triune Brain includes the R-complex or “reptilian brain” (governs instincts), the
Limbic System (governs emotions), and the Neocortex (governs higher-thinking).
• Downshifting occurs in the presence of perceived threat.
• Human beings have a highly developed forebrain, the Neocortex.
• This evolution makes higher-level thinking skills possible.
• The Limbic System is the seat of emotion and consists of structures like the hypothalamus (drives and actions, heart rate and respiration, flight or fight), the hippocampus (long-term memory), the reticular activating system
(arousal, master switch that indicates urgency) and the amygdala (aggression).
• The Neocortex is divided into four lobes and is where higher-level thinking occurs.
2. Sensory Systems and the Cerebral Cortex
• Sensory systems include the five senses: hear, taste, touch, smell, and see.
• Countless data comes in, all the time. We do not pay attention to all of it.
• A “go or no go” signal occurs to regulate the transmission of stimuli. This is sometimes called the neuron spike point, or sensory gating. Without this data monitoring, sensory overload, or flooding, would occur. This automatic physical process is a key aspect of what we actually process on a conscious level.
• Sensory flooding is what happens when too much data is getting through. There is some indication that disorders such as autism are in part, caused by this type of physiological data transmission problem.
• There are different parts of the brain (cortex) that are responsible for each sensory system: the primary visual cortex, the primary auditory cortex and the primary sensory/motor cortex (thus tactile/kinesthetic – touch sensation and body movement).
• There are four lobes in each hemisphere of the Neocortex: frontal lobe (thinking, planning), parietal lobe
(touching), temporal lobe (hearing) and occipital lobe (seeing).
3. Nerve Cells and the Nervous System
• Nerve cells consist of dendrites, a cell body, and an axon.
• The gap in between neurons is called a synapse.
• The nervous system is like a hard-wired electrical circuit, except it has gaps.
• Therefore, instead of just electrical current, electrochemical reactions occur to transmit the data. The signal turns chemical to get across the gap (and then turns electrical again).
• The nervous system links up to the brain through the spinal cord.
• The brain stem is the most primitive part of the brain and handles some automatic things.
• The midbrain includes the Limbic System and structures that directly affect our emotions.
• For complex and abstract thinking, the Neocortex, made up of two main hemispheres, gets involved.
• Dendrite growth and new connections between information sparks creativity.
4. The Limbic System and Emotion
• The human brain has a unique capacity for emotion and passion partially due to our unique interpretation of experience in terms of the passage of time. We have expectations for the future and vivid memories of the past.
• The midbrain includes an area called the Limbic System, which is central to the processing of emotion.
• The Limbic System includes the amygdala, which appears directly involved with aggression.
• The reticular activating system (RAS) is an important feature of the Limbic System. The RAS keeps us alert and responsive. It is this area that registers whether data is urgent, or not.
• The hippocampus processes long-term memory, which connects to current emotions.
5. Memory Systems
• The brain handles long-term and short-term memories differently.
• Previous knowledge enhances memory, which creates context for storing the new information.
• The more associations you can make, the better chance you have of long-term memory storage.
• These associations include involvement by multiple sensory systems: taste, touch, smell, hear, and see.
• Thus the saying: “What I hear, I forget. What I see, I remember. What I do, I know and understand.”
• Different techniques that touch upon the multiple intelligences of individuals aid memory such as rhymes, writing, song, body movements, drawings, or continual repetition.

139

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140

Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Brain Structure and Function Assessment Task [U3C2L1]

Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:

Relate the structure and function of the brain to the learning process
Linked Core Abilities

Build your capacity for life-long learning
Apply critical thinking techniques

Directions
For this Performance Assessment Task you will create a jigsaw puzzle of the brain.
1. First find a photo or graphic illustration of a brain (at least 8 x 10).
2. Attach the brain illustration to sturdy paper such as card stock or cardboard.
3. Divide the brain into the regions of the brain discussed in this learning plan to create a small jigsaw puzzle. 4. Label one side of the brain region with its proper name and label the other side with the functions of each region.
5. Add a life activity or skill such as dishwashing, driving, or test taking and determine which part of the brain is in use or affected by this action.
6. Use the attached scoring guide to evaluate your work before submitting it to your instructor.

141

Brain Structure and Function Scoring Guide
Criteria

Ratings

1. Puzzle is divided into major regions of the brain

met

not met

2. Puzzle labeling includes key words used in the learning plan

met

not met

3. Puzzle includes functions of each brain region

met

not met

4. Puzzle relates an external stimulus or activity to the region of the brain it affects

met

not met

FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
BUILD YOUR CAPACITY FOR LIFE-LONG LEARNING
5. You initiate formal and informal learning processes to acquire new abilities and insights

met

not met

met

not met

APPLY CRITICAL THINKING TECHNIQUES
8. You evaluate sources of information
Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

142

Student Learning Plan
Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Left and Right Brain Functions [U3C2L2]

Within the last 40 years scientists have shown that the left and right brain hemispheres have unique and specific functions. Before this breakthrough, brain function was a mystery. In this learning plan you will explore the differences between each hemisphere and how they impact personality, behaviors and learning. Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Distinguish between the functions of left brain and right brain
Linked Core Abilities
Apply critical thinking techniques

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will show that you have learned the target knowledge and skills:


by creating a table that charts personal activities within a day’s time as either left- or right-brain activities.

Your performance will be successful when:


table includes left and right brain hemispheres



table identifies activities completed within time frame given



table relates activity as right- or left-brain



table includes reasons for brain hemisphere identification



table is accompanied by a written summary of personal brain hemisphere dominance

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Identify the activity descriptions and functions of brain hemispheres
b. Describe the differences between global and analytical thinking
c. Explain how brain dominance helps determine personality and behavior
d. Determine personal information processing preferences
e. Define key words: analysis, bi-lateral transfer, cognition, complementary, Corpus Callosum, dominant, global, hemisphere, local, specialize, synchronize, synthesis

143

2

Left and Right Brain Functions [U3C2L2]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson.
Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

VIEW Video #1: Split Brain Research and DISCUSS the research of Roger Sperry. VIEW Visual #1: Brain
Dominance and DISCUSS the main points of brain dominance. COMPLETE Exercise #1: Logical or
Creative to identify with terms that describe how you act, what you do, and how you feel in certain situations. [Work independently] DETERMINE whether your answers classify you as “logical” or “creative”. INVESTIGATE your own actions further, by completing Exercise #2: Global or Analytical. CREATE a Multi-Flow Thinking Map showing the causes and effect of logical/creative or analytical/global assist in accomplishing specific kinds of tasks. [Work with 3-6 cadets] ADD responses to the reflection questions to your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] COMPLETE Exercise #1: Logical or Creative and Exercise #2: Global or Analytical and DETERMINE your own tendency toward either classification.

_____3.

VIEW the “Left Brain/Right Brain Dominance” video from the Quantum Learning CD-ROM. PARTICIPATE in four learning centers. FOLLOW the directions at each center. LEARN MORE about Left Brain and Right Brain dominance by reading the Left Brain/Right Brain section in your student text.
ANSWER the section review questions. [Work with a partner] ADD responses to the reflection questions to your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] READ the Left Brain/Right Brain section in your student text. ANSWER the section review questions. COMPLETE Exercise #3: Dominance Inventory and Exercise #4: Left-Right
Dominance.

_____5.

PARTICIPATE in a debate on one of the following topics: Creative or Logical, Specialize or Synchronize,
Details or Relationships or other ideas contained within the content of this learning plan. When taking your position, CONSIDER the following questions: (a) Which is more effective when problem solving?
(b) Which is more important when making something happen or when building something? FOLLOW debate rules provided by instructor. [Work with team of 3-6 cadets] ADD responses to the reflection questions to your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 5 independently.

_____7.

APPLY the key concepts presented in this learning plan to characters in a story or comic strip of your choice. DETERMINE if the characters in the story or comic strip can be associated to the following brain structures and functions: Right Brain, Left Brain, Whole Brain, Neurotransmitter, Endorphin,
Logical Spatial. SUMMARIZE your application in a short paper and present to others in the class. [Work independently.] OBTAIN the Left Brain/Right Brain Assessment Task and Scoring Guide.

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 7 independently.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.
_____2.

144

COMPLETE the Left-Brain/Right-Brain Assessment Task using the Scoring Guide to self-assess your work. SUBMIT the completed assessment to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Exercise 1: Logical or Creative
Directions (Instructor): Read the following list of terms aloud to cadets. Cadets should make a quick decision about how likely they are to be most comfortable in most situations then choose one category or the other. Direct cadets to form a line behind that category heading and form a human graph. Record the results.
Directions (Self-paced Option): Read the following list of terms by row (horizontally) and decide which term best suits you. Count up each column (vertically) to determine whether you are more logical or creative.
Logical – Analyze

Creative – Synthesize

Sequence

Clusters

Facts

Big Picture

Logical

Creative

Analyze

Synthesize

Orderly

Random

Examine & Evaluate

Connect & Make Meaning

Literal & Real

Theoretical & Possible

Name it

See it

Define it

Understand it

Rational

Emotional

Laser-like

Panoramic

Parts

Whole

Test

Theorize

Words

Pictures

Facts

Motivation

Reality

Fantasy

Define

Interpret

Organized

Spontaneous

Names

Faces

Realistic

Fantasy

Logic

Intuition

Well-structured

Open-ended

Language

Pictures

Serious

Humorous

Details/facts

Main idea /overview

Systematic plans

Exploration

Reliable

Impulsive

145

Exercise 2: Global or Analytical
Directions: Mark whether you agree or disagree with the following statements.

Statement
1.

I work or study best when there is music playing.

2.

I like nice, bright lights rather than a dim room when I’m working.

3.

I plan the steps I need to take to achieve my goals.

4.

I really appreciate new ideas.

5.

I like to eat or drink when I work.

6.

“Fail to plan and you plan to fail.”

7.

I can see connections between things other people don’t even notice.

8.

I like a clean, orderly place to do my work.

9.

I like dim light to work or study instead of bright light.

10.

People say I’m logical.

11.

I rely on my instincts to figure a new situation out.

12.

I prefer that it’s quiet when I work, so I can concentrate.

13.

I like a comfortable place to work, not a chair and a desk.

14.

People say I’m creative.

15.

I can usually sit down and stay focused for a long time.

16.

I like tried and true methods, because I know they will work.

17.

I prefer to get as much information as possible, and I’ll figure out how it fits together

18.

I like to take a lot of little breaks when I work or study.

19.

I prefer to stick with whatever I’m doing until it’s finished.

20.

I try to get the big picture first, before I learn a lot of details and facts.

21.

I prefer to handle things one step at a time.

22.

Sometimes I just know what to do, but I couldn’t tell you how I know or how to do it.

23.

Open your mind or you’ll miss a lot of options.

24.

I can see what the most important details are in any situation.

25.

I keep a vivid picture in my mind of my goal; then I just go with the flow to get there.

26.

I prefer to get just the important, relevant facts, not a lot of extra.

27.

When a new process is introduced, I prefer that someone show me how to do it.

28.

I usually have concrete facts that I use to make my decisions.

146

Agree

Disagree

Exercise 3: Brain Dominance Inventory
Directions: Select the statement which best describes you. Do not check both, or leave any blank. Force yourself to choose the one sentence, which is more accurate. These statements will help you discover your personal thinking style in the way you do your work.
1. A. I have to have neat, orderly surroundings to work in.
B. I have to have comfortable surroundings to work in.

A.__ or B.__

2. A. Deadlines and schedules make my work easier to do.
B. Deadlines and schedules interfere with the way I work.

A.__ or B.__

3. A. I am good at analyzing all the different parts of a problem.
B. I am good at thinking of many different solutions to a problem.

A.__ or B.__

4. A. I am proud of the creativity of my work.
B. I am proud of the thoroughness of my work.

A.__ or B.__

5. A. When I take a "break" I relax and do nothing.
B. When I take a "break" I find something different to do.

A.__ or B.__

6. A. I don’t think about the time when I work.
B. I plan out my time when doing my work.

A.__ or B.__

7. A. I will follow proven ways of doing new jobs.
B. I will find my own way of doing new jobs.

A.__ or B.__

8. A. I prefer to finish one job before starting a new one.
B. I prefer to be working on many jobs at the same time.

A.__ or B.__

9. A. I can usually analyze what should happen next.
B. I can usually sense what should happen next.

A.__ or B.__

10. A. I do easy things first and save important things for later.
B. I do important things first and other things later.

A.__ or B.__

11. A. Other people think I’m unorganized.
B. Other people think I organize things well.

A.__ or B.__

12. A. I arrange objects so they are off-center and angled.
B. I arrange objects so they are centered and in line.

A.__ or B.__

13. A. I follow an outline when I write a paper.
B. I don't use an outline or change it when I write.

A.__ or B.__

14. A. With a difficult decision I follow what I know.
B. With a difficult decision I follow my feelings.

A.__ or B.__

15. A. I question new ideas more than other people do.
B. I agree with new ideas before other people do.

A.__ or B.__

16. A. I change the way I do a job, for variety.
B. When one way works well, I don't change it.

A.__ or B.__

17. A. I am usually late.
B. I am usually on time.

A.__ or B.__

18. A. Where I put things depends on what I am doing.
B. I put each thing in a particular place.

A.__ or B.__

19. A. I am very consistent.
B. I am very spontaneous.

A.__ or B.__

20. A. I arrange clothes in my closet by length, season, etc.
B. I don't put clothes in my closet in any particular order.

A.__ or B.__

Laren Crane, Assistant Professor, Western Michigan State University
Used by permission from ©NAIL, Inc., Dr. Laurence D. Martel

147

Exercise 4: Left-Right Dominance
Directions: Check all of the items that apply to you. Add up each side (left and right). If you have a higher number in the right section, you're right brained. If the highest number is in the left section, you’re left brained. If the numbers are real close, you are bi-lateral, which means you use both sides the same amount of time.
Left:


















I'm pretty good at math.
I keep a to do list.
If I had to assemble something, I'd read the directions first.
I feel comfortable expressing myself with words.
Before I take a stand on an issue, I get all the facts.
I always wear a watch.
If I forgot someone's name, I'd go through the alphabet until I remembered it.
I have considered becoming a lawyer, journalist, or doctor.
I'd make a good detective.
I believe there is a right and wrong way to do everything.
Setting goals for myself helps keep me from slacking off.
If I have a tough decision to make, I write down the pros and the cons.
I keep a journal.
If someone asks me a question, I turn my head to the right.
If I lost something, I'd try to remember where I saw it last.
The expression "Life is just a bowl of cherries" makes no sense to me.

Right:


















When I talk, I gesture a lot.
I like to draw.
When I'm confused, I usually go with my gut instinct.
I lose track of time easily.
I find that sticking to a schedule is boring.
I am musically inclined.
I can tell if someone is guilty just by looking at them.
I've considered becoming a poet, a politician, an architect, or a dancer.
I believe there are two sides to every story.
I'd rather draw someone a map the tell them how to get somewhere.
If I have a problem, I try to work it out by relating it to one I've had in the past.
When somebody asks me a question, I turn my head to the left.
If I don't know which way to turn, I let my emotions guide me.
Some people think I'm psychic.
I'm always late getting places.
I hate following directions.

Add up the number of each that are checked:

148

LEFT ______

RIGHT______

Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Left Brain/Right Brain Assessment Task [U3C2L2]

Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:

Distinguish between the functions of left-brain and right brain
Linked Core Abilities

Apply critical thinking techniques

Directions
For this Performance Assessment Task you will keep a log of activities you do within a day. Start with the first thing you do in the morning to the last thing you do before you go to sleep. Examples of activities would include: turning off the alarm clock, taking a shower, selecting clothing to wear, brushing teeth, driving your car, opening your locker, studying for a history exam, taking a quiz, etc.
From the information listed in your log, create a chart with a column for Left Brain and a column for
Right Brain. Note whether each activity is left- or right-brained and give a short explanation why.
After you have completed your chart, write a short summary on what you learned about your own brain's preference and how this has impacted or will impact your academic success, your personal interests and your future. Your summary should be no more than one page long -- hand written or word-processed.
Your chart presentation should be neat with clear points. You may create the chart by hand OR by using a computer application such as Microsoft Word, Excel or Access.
Use the attached scoring guide to self-assess your work prior to submitting it. Submit your completed chart to your instructor for evaluation.

149

Left-Brain/Right-Brain Summary Scoring Guide
Criteria

Ratings

1. Table includes left and right brain hemispheres

met

not met

2. Table identifies activities completed within time frame given

met

not met

3. Table relates activity as right- or left-brain

met

not met

4. Table includes reasons for brain hemisphere identification met

not met

5. Table is accompanied by a written summary of personal brain hemisphere dominance

met

not met

6. Written product fulfills a clear purpose

met

not met

7. Written product shows evidence of logical critical thinking

met

not met

8. Written product follows prescribed format, meeting criteria for all components

met

not met

9. Written product exhibits correct and appropriate grammar, punctuation, spelling, syntax, and word usage met

not met

FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
APPLY CRITICAL THINKING TECHNIQUES
10. You evaluate sources of information
Name _________________________________________

met

not met

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

150

Student Learning Plan
Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Learning Style and Processing Preferences [U3C2L3]

Learning styles describe the various ways people gather, as we as process information. Each of us has a propensity for looking, listening, or touching in order to learn. For some learning how to play a game of
Monopoly might mean reading the instructions. For others it may be to listen to instructions being read and for others it may be to roll the dice and learn while playing. Furthermore, each has a more productive time of day and specific environmental factors that impact learning. In this learning plan you will examine your own learning style and processing preference and the learning models that consider many needs.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Explain how learning styles and preferences can impact learning
Linked Core Abilities
Apply critical thinking techniques

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will show that you have learned the target knowledge and skills:
G

by revising a learning experience to consider and include essential elements of the learning process.

Your performance will be successful when:
G

learning experience considers the uniqueness of individual learning styles and preferences

G

learning experience includes a teaching process that considers G/A, VAK or Senge concepts

G

learning experience includes application of the Dunn and Dunn five-phase learning model

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Assess the uniqueness of individual learning styles and preferences
b. Distinguish among the three sensory (perceptual) systems
c. Explain the essential elements of the learning process
d. Contrast an automatic and purposeful response to stimuli
e. Explain the five phases of learning in the Dunn and Dunn learning model
f. Explore how to expand beyond your current preferences
g. Define key words: auditory, kinesthetic, mobility, mode, motivation, perception, persistence, reflex, schema, sensory, sociological, tactile

151

2

Learning Style and Processing Preferences [U3C2L3]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson.
Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

VIEW the “Explore Your Styles” video from the Quantum Learning CD-ROM. COMPLETE Exercise #1:
Learning Styles Map and Exercise #2: Learning Styles Inventory and ASSESS your results. [Work independently] Now, VIEW the “Diversity of Learners” video clip from the Quantum Learning CD-ROM. WORK
THROUGH the video topics beginning with “Learning Styles”. VIEW Visual #2: The Learning Process.
LEARN MORE about learning styles and preferences by reading the Learning Styles, Preferences and Models section of your student text. ANSWER the section review questions. CREATE a Flow Map illustrating the learning processes of a required JROTC fitness skill.

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 1 independently.

_____3.

VIEW Visual #3: Senge’s Ladder of Inference. PARTICIPATE in a discussion about the key points of data selection, schema development and Senge’s Ladder of Inference. LEARN MORE about learning models and the Dunn and Dunn model of learning by reading the rest of the Learning Styles, Preferences and Models section of your student text. [Work with a partner] COMPLETE Exercise #3: Learning
Activity Preference Match. JIGSAW or RESEARCH one of the following topics: Global vs. Analytical
(G/A) thinking; Auditory, Kinesthetic, or Visual (VAK) perceptual modalities or Senge’s Ladder of
Inference (data selection, schema development). [Work with team of 3-6 cadets]

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 3 independently. COMPLETE Exercise #4: Learning
Activity Self-Preference Match. CREATE a Tree Map classifying pertinent information about each topic.

_____5.

CREATE and DELIVER a presentation using graphic organizers, role-play, process or prop as an appropriate technique for the topic you researched in Learning Activity 3. [Work with a team of 3-6 cadets]
ADD responses to the reflection questions to your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 5 independently.

_____7.

GENERATE a list of accomplishments you wish to make in the next two weeks. [Work independently]
THINK-SHARE-PAIR each list to four challenges that include learning new concepts, skills, and difficulty levels. DEVELOP a list of three actions that can be taken to decrease difficulty and increase learning power in each situation.

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 7 independently. OBTAIN the Learning Styles,
Preferences and Models Assessment Task and Scoring Guide.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.
_____2.

152

COMPLETE the Learning Styles, Preferences and Models Assessment Task. USE the Scoring Guide to self assess your work prior to submitting to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

©NAIL, Inc., Dr. Laurence D. Martel

153

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154

Exercise 2: Learning Styles Inventory
Directions (Part 1): Complete this self-assessment to determine your learning styles based on the Dunn and Dunn model. Check the appropriate column to indicate whether each numbered statement is true or false.
True

False

ENVIRONMENTAL
1. If the room is too hot, I can’t concentrate.
2. Having some background music helps me concentrate.
3. I prefer to make myself comfortable rather than being at a desk.
4. I can ignore most sound when I study.
5. Bright light is distracting.
6. I study best when it’s quiet.
7. I don’t see how people can see in a dark room.
EMOTIONAL
1. I need a lot of encouragement to complete tasks.
2. I’m pretty self-directed about getting my work done.
3. The adults in my life help me to accomplish more.
4. I give up too easily unless someone helps me stick it through.
5. I like having clear directions and well-defined steps.
6. I have to be reminded often to do things.
7. If I’m interested, I can really stick with it through very challenging work.
SOCIOLOGICAL
1. Having a friend to study with works well for me.
2. I like to work with others.
3. Getting together with a friend is a good way to get homework done.
4. Working in a team is frustrating.
5. People my age have the most to offer me when I learn.
6. How many people can be a good workgroup really depends on the kind of work I’m doing.
7. Usually an adult can help me to get through a study challenge.
PHYSICAL
1. The things I remember best are the things I write down.
2. I feel more energetic at night.
3. Seeing a picture, graph or diagram really helps me to understand.
4. I need to take a lot of breaks while I’m study.
5. I can remember almost everything I hear.
6. Things make more sense to me when I can handle them and see how they work.
7. I like to eat snacks and drink a lot while I study.
8. The morning is the best time to get a lot done.
9. I often get tired in the afternoon.
10. I need to get up and move around when I study.
11. It’s hard for me to sit in one place for a long time.
PSYCHOLOGICAL
1. I like to think about things first and not jump right in.
2. Sometimes people think I put things off, but I still get them done.
3. I’d rather teachers didn’t lecture so much, because I’d rather find out for myself.
4. I like to finish one thing before I start another.
5. It drives me crazy when the teacher forgets to write things down.
6. I can pay attention to a lot of things at the same time.
7. Things make more sense when you take them one step at a time.

155

Directions (Part 2): Using your answers in Part 1, complete the following Dunn and Dunn matrix by indicating your learning styles and processing preferences.
Environmental

Light

Temperature

Design

How much?
What kind?

Emotional

Sound

Bright or Dim?

Cool or Warm?

Formal or
Flexible?

Motivation

Persistence

Responsibility

Structure

High, Medium or Low?

Sociological

External or
Self-directed?

Self

Pair

Peers

Team

Perceptual

Food/Drink

Time

Mobility

Auditory?
Visual? Body
Kinesthetic?

Frequent snacks desired or not?

Morning,
Afternoon, or
Evening?

Move around or sit still?

Analytic/
Global

Hemispheric
Dominance

Impulsive/
Reflective

Can you break things down into steps or parts? Do you see the big picture? Left or right dominant? Do you like to get going and make things happen or think about it first?

Whom do you like to work with? When?

Physical

Psychological

156

Adult

Varied

Exercise 3: Learning Activity Preference Match
Directions: List three things you would like to learn. For each learning goal, list factors from the Dunn and Dunn Learning
Styles model that either would help you to learn or might stand in your way. Name at least one factor (sound, light, etc.) in each of the five dimensions (environmental, physical, etc.) that would affect your ability to learn. Include a specific preference choice for each factor. Example: Put down a preference for “soft music,” do not just list the factor, “sound.”
Refer to your completed self-assessment (Exercise 1: Learning Styles Inventory) to make sure you have covered any major learning preferences. Consider additional factors, as well.
1. I want to learn:
These factors might affect me:

2. I want to learn:
These factors might affect me:

3. I want to learn:
These factors might affect me:

Environmental

Light

Temperature

Design

How much?
What kind?

Emotional

Sound

Bright or Dim?

Cool or Warm?

Formal or
Flexible?

Motivation

Persistence

Responsibility

Structure

High, Medium or Low?

Sociological

External or
Self-directed?

Self

Pair

Peers

Team

Perceptual

Food/Drink

Time

Mobility

Auditory?
Visual? Body
Kinesthetic?

Frequent snacks desired or not?

Morning,
Afternoon, or
Evening?

Move around or sit still?

Analytic/
Global

Hemispheric
Dominance

Impulsive/
Reflective

Can you break things down into steps or parts? Do you see the big picture? Left or right dominant? Adult

Varied

Do you like to get going and make things happen or think about it first?

Whom do you like to work with? When?
Physical

Psychological

157

Exercise 4: Learning Activity Preference Match
Directions: Read the scenario assigned by your instructor and think about how you could make this character come alive for the class. Think of a few lines you could say in a role-play to illustrate the character traits identified.

1. Jennifer is an active kid, always drawing pictures and banging around. While she loves to do homework, sometimes it is hard to just sit still. She really loves field trips, and learns a lot when out in nature, at the zoo, an aquarium, or planetarium. If anyone would bother to ask her about these things, she could tell them, draw them a picture, or create a graph or chart easily. But if you just ask her to write a report she thinks that is pretty boring.
2. Mario loves music. He can learn difficult guitar phrasing quickly and play it with feeling. He is an expert with the soundboard and gets asked to deejay all the parties and dances. Sometimes his homework gets left undone while he practices for the next concert. When he does sit down to do it, he does a lot better with a friend or his dad helping him. Even better, put him in a large group and he rules. 3. Thomas can figure out any computer software in a matter of minutes. If he looks at the source code on a web page, the code actually makes sense to him! But don’t bother asking him to finish his poetry assignment. He thinks that is a complete waste of time. Maybe if he could write about his new car or his dog he could stay interested. He pretty much hangs out alone or with a friend. Crowds kind of feel too loud and crazy for him.
4. Mark is a serious student. He really cares about his work, and it is always done completely and accurately. He worries sometimes that he is missing things or that some things are not correct. He likes to look things up in dictionaries and encyclopedias. Science, math and computers are his strength. When asked to write a story, though, he freezes up.
5. Kathy talks just about all the time, with her friends, teachers, parents, and even the people who work at the mall. She keeps a diary to record all her most secret thoughts. Her best friend knows how much she dreams of being a writer and an artist. She has two favorite teachers and does a lot of extra work in those classes just because she loves it. Her mother never has to tell her to do her homework. She’s never gotten anything but straight As in her life.
6. Joshua is a businessman at a young age. The main reason he’ll do his schoolwork at all is to keep his insurance rates down. He can figure out the difference between a 5% and an 8% loan in no time, and how much more it will cost you if you borrow the money for two years instead of just one. When he studies, his radio is blasting and he answers the phone every few minutes. He’ll shoot a couple instant messenger questions off to his friend to find out how they solved the problem or what topic they used for their report. But if you ask him to stay after school to talk with his teacher, forget it unless you have punishment or a bribe.

Character assigned:
What lines could you say that will illustrate the character traits identified?

158

Exercise 5: Teaching Activity
Directions: Complete each section.

1. Provide a description of the learning activity. Describe the task, skill, or concept you will be teaching.

2. Provide a description of the learner information such as age, gender, species, existing knowledge or skills that affect the ability to learn this concept or skill.

3. List the steps in your teaching process. 4. How did your teaching process incorporate G/A,
AKV, or Senge concepts?

5. What stimuli was part of this learning experience?

6. What results did you see?
Was the learner able to demonstrate knowledge or the new skill? If so, how?

7. Did your teaching process work? Why or why not?

159

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160

Unit 3: Foundations for Success
Learning Style and Processing Preferences Assessment
Task [U3C2L3]

Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:

Explain how learning styles and preferences can impact learning
Linked Core Abilities

Build your capacity for life-long learning
Apply critical thinking techniques

Directions
For this performance assessment task you will consider a past learning experience you've encountered and create a "new" process for teaching the activity to you (and others within that learning experience) again.
Use Exercise 5: Teaching Activity to assist you in this assessment. Consider the steps below when putting your teaching activity together.
1. Select one concept, skill or task to teach.
2. Provide a description of the learner(s) -- age, gender, existing knowledge or skills that affect the ability to learn the concept or skill.
3. List the steps originally used to teach the concept, skill or task.
4. List the new steps of your teaching process.
5. Determine how your teaching process used G/A, AKV or Senge concepts.
6. Determine how your teaching process considered the five phases of the Dunn and Dunn Learning
Model.
7. Compare the original teaching process to your newly revised teaching process.
8. Determine what stimuli is part of the new learning experience.
9. Describe how this new activity can now meet a visual, auditory and kinesthetic learner's style.
10. Describe how this new activity can also meet a variety of learning preferences.
Use the attached scoring guide to assist you with this activity. Self-assess your work using the criteria provided. Submit your completed assessment to your instructor for evaluation.

161

Learning Styles, Preferences and Models Scoring Guide
Criteria

Ratings

1. You complete the Exercise 5: Teaching Activity worksheet revising a past learning experience

met

not met

2. Learning experience provides a description of the experienced learning activity concept, task or skill met

not met

3. Learning experience considers the uniqueness of individual learning styles and preferences

met

not met

4. Learning experience includes a teaching process that considers G/A, VAK or Senge concepts

met

not met

5. Learning experience includes application of the
Dunn and Dunn 5-phase learning model

met

not met

6. Learning experience lists the steps in the teaching process

met

not met

7. Learning experience compares the new teaching process to the old process

met

not met

8. Worksheet is neatly presented using institution's standards for satisfaction in spelling, grammar and punctuation met

not met

FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
BUILD YOUR CAPACITY FOR LIFE LONG LEARNING

9. You assume personal responsibility for learning

met

not met

10. You assess personal learning styles and preferences and apply this knowledge to the learning process

met

not met

APPLY CRITICAL THINKING TECHNIQUES
11. You make decisions considering alternatives and consequences
Name _________________________________________

met

not met

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

162

Student Learning Plan
Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Multiple Intelligences [U3C2L4]

Everyone is unique — in appearance, interest, ability, talent and personality. The brain is no exception.
We use our different intelligences to solve problems, choose a profession and excel in various aspects of life. In this learning plan you will explore how your brain can process and take in more information and increase learning by identifying the eight multiple intelligences. You will assess your own intelligence strength to help you increase your learning power.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Use your intellectual strengths to improve academic performance
Linked Core Abilities
Apply critical thinking techniques

Build your capacity for life-long learning

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will show that you have learned the target knowledge and skills:
G

by documenting application of your multiple-intelligence strengths to improve learning.

Your performance will be successful when:
G

you write a goal statement

G

you develop a two-week action plan

G

you incorporate your multiple intelligences into your action plan

G

you document how your multiple intelligence impacted improvement

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Assess Gardner’s impact on the understanding of intelligence
b. Identify the eight types of intelligences
c. Distinguish between inter- and intra-personal
d. Examine how to strengthen intelligence
e. Define key words: Bodily/Kinesthetic intelligence, Logical/Mathematical intelligence, Intrapersonal intelligence, Interpersonal intelligence, Musical/Rhythmical intelligence, Naturalist intelligence, Visual/Spatial intelligence, Verbal/Linguistic intelligence

163

2

Multiple Intelligences [U3C2L4]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson.
Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

COMPLETE Exercise #1: Multiple Intelligences Assessment. [Work independently] SHARE what you learned about yourself with a partner. JOIN a team of others with similar intelligence dominance.
SELECT a novel character to describe using a set instructor-posted intelligence preferences. CHOOSE your preference and SHARE how you would respond with others in the class. [Work in team of 3-6 cadets] RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] COMPLETE Exercise #1: Multiple Intelligences Assessment. Given the following three tasks: (a) Think about a personal experience. (b) Examine a chart. (c) Read a book — which activity for assessment would you choose — (a) Write a response. (b) Develop a hypothesis. (c) Draw a picture. (d) Build a model. (e) Create a song. (f) Share with a friend. (g) Design your own response. (h)
Relate this to the natural world. RELATE your selection to the results of Exercise #1. RECORD your discovery in your Cadet Notebook.

_____3.

VIEW the Quantum Learning CD-ROM and EXPLORE the various intelligences presented. RESEARCH a given intelligence topic. LEARN MORE about multiple intelligences by reading the Multiple Intelligences section in your student text. ANSWER the lesson review questions. CREATE a product or performance that demonstrates the type of intelligence you researched. PRESENT your product or performance to others.
ADD attributes of your assigned intelligence to class Tree Map. [Work in a team of 3-6 cadets] RECORD answers to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook. [Work independently]

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 3 independently. ANSWER the lesson review questions and record them into your Cadet Notebook. CREATE a Tree Map with the eight intelligences and attributes of each.

_____5.

REVIEW one of the seven case studies provided in Exercise #2: Process Scenarios. IDENTIFY the different intelligences that interact with each other in your assigned scenario. USE Exercise #2 to record your thoughts. [Work with a team of 3-6 cadets] OBSERVE while others teams share their scenario observations. DEFINE multiple intelligence. COMPARE the definition to that posted in Learning Activity 1.
CREATE a Double-Bubble Map showing comparisons and contrasts of the two definitions. [Work in a large group] RECORD your answers to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 5 independently.

_____7.

CONSIDER how you learn and process information. CREATE a list of all activities that could be done to help improve your learning in this class. [Work independently] JOIN other cadets with similar Multiple
Intelligence strengths. ADD to the list and SHARE with other teams. [Work with a team of 3-6 cadets]
WRITE a goal statement and action plan describing two things you plan to do in the next two weeks to improve your learning and performance within one course. [Work independently] RECORD responses to the reflection questions in your Cadet Notebook. OBTAIN the Multiple Intelligences Assessment Task and Scoring Guide.

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 7 independently.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

164

COMPLETE the Multiple Intelligences Assessment Task. USE the Scoring Guide to self-assess your work before submitting it to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Exercise 1: Multiple Intelligence Assessment
Directions: Complete this self-assessment to determine your multiple intelligence strengths. Check the appropriate boxes to indicate the statements that are characteristic of you, then go back and total the checkmarks for all eight intelligences.
The more checkmarks you have, the greater the strength of that intelligence.
Visual-Spatial Intelligence












I have a good sense of dimension and perspective.
I love to doodle while I listen to lectures, speeches, etc.
I enjoy drawing, sculpting, painting, etc.
I am good at reading maps, charts, graphs, diagrams, etc.
I can accurately reproduce, through my drawings, people, landscapes, objects, etc.
I like spending time designing and building things.
I learn best when I think in clear, visual pictures or images.
I enjoy taking pictures or videotapes.
I like colors and various color combinations.
I enjoy courses like Art, Geometry, Photography, etc.
_______ = Total

Logical-Mathematical Intelligence












I can solve arithmetic problems quickly.
I love investigating various uses of computers.
I enjoy exploring patterns, categories, associations, etc.
I am good at mathematics and computations.
I can organize, analyze, and interpret data, then make predictions.
I can solve problems through reasoning and logic.
I like competing at chess, checkers, and other strategy games.
I look for logic flaws in the statements/arguments of others.
I like to conduct experiments to test an hypothesis.
I enjoy courses like Math, Physics, Science, etc.
_______ = Total

Verbal-Linguistic Intelligence












I take pleasure from reading book and writing stories.
I like to write, read, and listen to others.
I enjoy spinning tall tales, telling jokes, or sharing stories.
I have a good memory for names, events, facts, and trivia.
I find that spelling words accurately is easy.
I have a large vocabulary that I use frequently.
I find it easy to express what I want to communicate.
I enjoy crossword puzzles and other word games.
I like to discuss ideas or debate controversial issues.
I enjoy courses like English, History, etc.
_______ = Total

165

Musical-Rhythmic Intelligence












I take pleasure from playing a musical instrument.
I like to tap or make rhythmical sounds while I’m busy.
I enjoy singing and I have a pleasant singing voice.
I can tell when a musical note is off-key.
I turn on music when I am studying or working.
I know the melodies to lots of songs, tunes, musicals, etc.
I like musicals and other types of musical performances.
I enjoy keeping time to music.
I have a large collection of CDs and tapes.
I enjoy courses like Chorus, Orchestra, Band, etc.
_______ = Total

Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence












I am well coordinated, and I acquire fine and gross motor skills easily.
I love exercising and taking care of my body.
I enjoy handicrafts like sewing, knitting, woodworking, etc.
I am good at a variety of sports, and I consider myself an athlete.
I like to dance, and I pick up dance steps quickly.
I fidget when I am seated or inactive for any length of time.
I learn or think best when I exercise, move around, manipulate objects, act things out, etc.
I like to touch/be touched by people when talking to them.
I assess or evaluate information through body sensations.
I enjoy courses like Woodworking, Home Economics, Physical Education, Small Engine Repair, etc.
_______ = Total

Naturalist Intelligence












I appreciate nature, and I can differentiate among the various species of flora and fauna.
I love spending time outdoors camping, hiking, etc.
I enjoy reading about or listening to programs on nature.
I learn best when I associate information with nature.
I have a green thumb with both indoor and outdoor plants.
I can train animals, and I have or have had numerous pets.
I like star gazing, bird watching, nature hiking, etc.
I notice weather patterns, geological formations, etc.
I care for the environment by composting, recycling, etc.
I enjoy courses like Geology, Botany, Biology, etc.
_______ = Total

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Intrapersonal Intelligence











I am conscious of my inner feelings and aware of my personal strengths and weaknesses.
I enjoy a strong sense of self, and I require both my independence and setting my own self-direction.
I find myself reacting with strong opinions when controversial courses are discussed
I need to spend a lot of time in my own private world.
I enjoy pursuing my personal interests and hobbies alone.
I am self–motivated to work on independent study projects.
I trust myself and my intuition.
I like to reflect on my life events, and I keep a journal.
I enjoy courses like Psychology, Philosophy, etc.
_______ = Total

Interpersonal Intelligence












I socialize at school, work, church, home, etc.
I consider myself a good friend, and I have many friends.
I like to organize groups/teams and am considered a leader.
I learn better when I get to share and cooperate with others.
I am good at helping others work through their problems, and I am often asked to be a mediator.
I like to communicate with others to keep them informed.
I prefer playing team sports like basketball, volleyball, etc.
I enjoy teaching others the things I am able to do.
I have a lot of empathy for the feelings of others.
I enjoy courses like Social Studies, Geography, etc.
_______ = Total

List your intelligences in order of strength (greatest to least) below or create a chart indicating where your strengths rest.
1. ___________________________
2. ___________________________
3. ___________________________
4. ___________________________
5. ___________________________
6. ___________________________
7. ___________________________
8. ___________________________

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Exercise 2: Process Scenarios
Directions: Read the seven scenarios. Understanding that humans each have a “jagged profile” as unique as their fingerprints, identify several “frames of mind” or “kinds of minds” for each vignette. Then, complete the chart in order to identify at least three of the seven intelligences presented in each story. After plotting the information culled from the vignettes, look for insights, reflections, and questions that surface about the multiple intelligences profiles of the human mind and the complexities presented in the scenarios. Notice that not just one intelligence is highlighted, a number of different intelligences interact with one another in each of the cases.

MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES VIGNETTES: “FRAMES OF MIND”
Character

Frame 1

Frame 2

Frame 3

Juanita (6 yrs)

Lupe (8 yrs.)

Alicia (10 yrs.)

Trevor (12 yrs.)

Tracy (16 yrs.)

Heather (20 yrs.)

Ira (37 yrs.)

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Juanita (6 years old)
Juanita is labeled “gifted” in the first grade. Not only can she read at the age of six, she has also completed the trilogy of The Hobbit. Her vast vocabulary is evident in her speech and writing, and she can spell “spaghetti” as easily as “cat.” She loves both nonfiction and the classic literature her father introduced her to. Juanita’s verbal skills are extraordinary, and her teachers are challenged to keep her moving forward in this area.
Accompanying Juanita’s forte for verbalization is her naturally developed musical intelligence, an intelligence
Gardner classifies as language related. Schooled in the Suzuki method from the age of three, Juanita is an accomplished pianist. Her repertoire of classical pieces is impressive, and one senses Juanita’s immersion in her performances. In fact, when she plays the piano, she’s happy all day. The musical intelligence spills over into her written work. She writes about the piano and illustrates many of her ideas with musical notes.
Paints, crayons, chalk, and pastels are the favorite tools of this image-conscious youngster. Illustrations fill her written works, regardless of their content. Her science paper is filled with progressive sketches of her beans growing in the window, and her sentences and stories are accented with detailed drawings that enhance her words. Even Juanita’s printing and lettering are elaborated with scrolls, swirls, and squiggles, and decorative engravings border her daily work. Juanita’s images are so strong that she converses with an imaginary friend and playmate, Bunny. Yet, when someone else acknowledges the existence of Bunny, Juanita giggles and says, “Oh, he’s only pretend.”

Lupe (8 years old)
Lupe, a third grader, is proficient at the highly complex game of Dungeons and Dragons. Beginning with the strategic logic of chess, Lupe quickly moved into the voluminous paraphernalia and many layers of the Dungeons and Dragons episodes. Also indicative of his logical reasoning is his fascination with nonfiction. Lupe often plows through encyclopedia entries, moving from the top of a page right on through to the last entry on the page. His ability with numbers is phenomenal. He makes computations in his head and calls out answers that are usually verified by his calculator.
Lupe’s amazing sense of logic is complemented by his keenness for visualizing. Even at a young age, he took an unusual interest in his clothes and often selected colorful sweaters to wear with matching socks and coordinated shirts to assemble a look that was pleasing. Connected closely to his skillful and strategic logic in gamesmanship is his ability to visualize. By picturing possible moves of game pieces, he can “see” the outcomes.
His mind’s eye, in effect, directs his play.
Lupe prefers to be alone with his books, games, and creative toys. He likes to invent electronic devices and gadgets such as burglar alarms and experiment with chemistry sets and the like. Lupe is aware of his own inquisitiveness as well as his likes and dislikes. He appears comfortable with himself and often explains his motivations to his parents. Knowing himself at such a young age, Lupe shows that he has an unusual propensity for self-reflection.

Alicia (10 years old)
If there isn’t music or rhythm where Alicia is, she creates her own. At the age of ten, she is taking keyboard lessons and willingly practices an hour every day after school. She loves music in school and has already starred in two musical performances. Alicia and her family live several miles from the nearest large city, which suits her just fine because her family sings and harmonizes all the way there and back.
Alicia’s teachers know how much she loves music. When they see her tapping her toe or pencil, they often ask what song she’s singing in her head. She is very proud of the perfect score she recently received on a namethe-states test. She gives credit to the song “Fifty Nifty United States,” which lists every state alphabetically. Her teacher agrees that the song must have helped, because he noticed that during the test Alicia’s head nodded in a steady beat before she wrote each answer.
When she is not creating or practicing her music, Alicia is off and running. Her parents enrolled her in dance at the age of four. She wants to learn to twirl the baton so that she can become the majorette for the band when she is older. Her favorite day at school is “Track and Field Day,” where she enters almost every event. She especially enjoys jumping the hurdles. Settling down seems to take longer for Alicia than some of her classmates, and sitting for long periods of time is sheer torture! She loves being teacher’s helper and volunteers

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to help set up centers, perform science experiments, play classroom instruments, and anything else that involves active learning.
When Alicia’s pencil isn’t tapping out a beat, it is usually drawing or doodling. She loves making collages and mobiles and understands best when her teacher uses graphics such as semantic maps and Venn diagrams.
Alicia has found that “making pictures in her head,” as she calls it, helps her to understand and remember what she is learning. She first discovered the powerful effect of visualizing when she had to memorize a piano solo for recital. She had practiced and practiced, but when she sat down on the piano bench, her mind went blank. She couldn’t even remember the name of her solo. Alicia looked straight ahead, wishing there were some music in front of her. Suddenly, she could “see” it, every page of it, in her head, and by the time she finished playing her solo flawlessly, she even remembered its title!

Trevor (12 years old)
Trevor is a seventh grader who is just as proud of his collection of doodles and pictures as he is of his good grades. Many of his drawings are done during school in classes that are lecture-based or “just plain boring,” as
Trevor puts it. Others are a result of long hours of detailed work on sketches and designs. While his classmates make simple book covers, Trevor creates covers with intricate and complex geometrical designs or cartoon characters. Trevor is drawn to classrooms that are picture rich. Slides, mobiles, photos, overhead transparencies, and other visuals that reinforce the lesson make all the difference in his motivation and understanding. He is easily frustrated by an overdose of words, whether he’s reading, writing, or listening to them. His frustration about long writing assignments quickly changes to excitement, however, when he is encouraged to include visuals. He doesn’t seem to mind doing required research or writing if he can express himself through his drawings and pictures. Trevor’s teacher can identify Trevor’s reports without his name because they always have one picture on the front, one on the back, and several throughout.
Trevor spends most of his free time putting together and painting models. Watching him work is truly a
“moving” experience, because he begins at a table, then lies on the floor, then stands. He loves math class this year because, as he says, the teacher “keeps us really busy when we learn. We move around to different centers and use manipulatives.”
Trevor is definitely not a social butterfly. He couldn’t care less about having a wide circle of friends. Instead, he has a small group of close friends and is happy to spend time alone. His mental and physical well-being are very important to him, as is his academic achievement. Trevor tried out several groups and organizations in school before he settled on OM (Odyssey of the Mind). He seems to have found his niche. The sponsor says that when the group is working on a problem, Trevor seems to be able to visualize what is needed to solve it.
Then he goes off by himself and makes a prototype, which the group refines and develops.

Tracy (16 years old)
Tracy, a high school junior, is on the pompom squad and in the swing choir. She takes dance lessons and also helps teach dance to young children. Tracy operates video equipment for her parents and sets the VCR when anyone in the family wants to record something. She loves to go on errands, whether for teachers or her parents, especially if it means driving the car.
Tracy seems to have an endless supply of energy when she is interested and motivated. She is always ready to pitch in on special school and classroom projects. At other times, when she has been sitting too long or when the entire class is engaged in quiet reading, she gets fidgety. Only the teachers who understand Tracy know to suggest that she stand up or move.
Music is a large part of Tracy’s world. In addition to being on the pompom squad and singing in the swing choir, Tracy plays the piano, sings in the concert choir, and knows every song from the musical her school put on last year. Her current kick in preferred style is country, but that changes fairly regularly. She begs to see every musical production that comes to town, and she can sing or rap to every commercial. If it were up to Tracy, music would be piped into every classroom as a background to learning. It’s never off in her bedroom!
Tracy loves people. Almost everything she is a part of involves others. Interacting with people is second nature to Tracy. Not long ago, a boy in one of her classes asked her, “Who are you, anyway? You talk to everybody!” She spends hours on the phone and doesn’t feel that a weekend is a success unless she is invited

171

to at least one party. She likes to study with friends and worries when there is conflict. She is the unofficial peacekeeper within each of her groups. Cooperative learning activities and all-group discussions are definitely her cup of tea.
Heather (20 years old)
If ever there were a “perfect coed,” Heather would be it. A twenty-year-old college student at a large university, she never even seemed to be homesick when she left for her first year of school. Now a sophomore, she has many friends, both male and female, and every one of her teachers knows and likes her. She was recently in charge of a community service event for her sorority. The event needed a high percentage of participation in order for it to be successful and Heather pulled it off. Speaking of sororities, Heather shares her room with three other girls and loves it. She says the only problem they have is in divvying up phone time.
Because of her high grades, Heather qualified for several honors classes. She particularly likes English because it involves a lot of group discussion and problem solving. She plans to major in elementary education and special education. In high school, Heather was on the soccer team and the cheerleading squad. Now, in college, she jogs and walks every day and is actively involved in campus activities. Last year she was a dancer in a charity production on campus. She likes to sit on her bed to study, with her books and papers spread around her; however, she must get up and move regularly. Her class schedule suits her because she has time to move about during the day. Heather’s strengths in reading, writing, and speaking have helped her fit into both educational and social settings easily. She loves to read and comprehends what she is reading without really trying. When speaking, she uses metaphors, humor, and wit, which isn’t usually so well developed in a person her age. She is sensitive to language and responds in tears when she interprets someone’s remarks as critical, sarcastic, or belittling.
People like being around her because she is careful of others’ feelings in her conversations.

Ira (37 years old)
Ira is grounded by an unusual insightfulness, which is partially a result of his self-exploration into his own spirituality. This exploration has lead Ira to understand what motivates him. He is clear on what he values and where those values are rooted. This introspective nature spills over into others also, and Ira’s intuitive and knowing ways are sought out by trusting family members and friends alike. His advice is valued because it seems to echo an inner voice.
Linked to his introspective nature is his acuity for language. He is a voracious reader and loves to create fictional works of his own. Readers invariably remark about the striking and memorable quality of his written words. Related to Ira’s inward nature is his natural ability to run long distances. In contrast to his love of running marathons is his fondness and skill for team sports. Ira displays above-average athletic abilities from years of playing basketball, baseball, and football. His propensity for athletics is so keen that even now in his adult years he is able to attack new sports such as swimming, skiing, rollerblading, and tennis with the same grace and ease that punctuated his youth.
Interestingly, others often note Ira’s gentle way with people. Although he is somewhat shy upon meeting people, he somehow manages to put others at ease. They seem to sense a genuineness that creates the loyalty and friendship of people whom he has encountered throughout his life.
In his school career, Ira formed a lyrical opera club. He also has a fondness for the rhythm of rap music.
Both opera and rap music are entwined with the language of lyrics.
Ira’s writings are frequently punctuated with images and extended metaphors: “You’re like a bicycle, as soon as you stop moving, you fall down.” This visualization skill surfaces in another realm. Trained as a chef, Ira has an uncanny sense of presentation. He serves the simplest food in ways that are pleasing to the eye.
While often overshadowed, another intelligence manifests itself frequently in Ira’s exceptional memory for facts, data, and information. At a moment’s notice, he can rattle off sports statistics, historical sequences, and film trivia ad infinitum. In addition, the logic he brings to an argument or point of view is more often than not, right on target.

172

Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Your Multiple Intelligences Assessment Task [U3C2L4]

Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:

Use your intellectual strengths to improve academic performance
Linked Core Abilities

Build your capacity for life-long learning
Apply critical thinking techniques

Directions
For this assessment task you will create "Using My Multiple Intelligence" log.
1. First, select a course you would like to improve in.
2. Then, write one or two goal statements.
3. Develop and action plan that relates (or can use) your multiple intelligence strengths to your plan for improvement. 4. Record your day-to-day data in a chart or table.
5. Document daily results of your application of multiple intelligence strength.
Use the attached scoring guide to self-assess your work prior to submitting it to your instructor for evaluation. Submit your completed assessment task to your instructor for evaluation.

173

Your Multiple Intelligences Scoring Guide
Criteria

Ratings

1. You write a goal statement

met

not met

2. You assume personal responsibility for learning

met

not met

3. You assess personal learning styles and preferences and apply this knowledge to the learning process

met

not met

4. You access available resources for personal and professional growth

met

not met

5. You refine action plans based on evaluation of feedback

met

not met

6. You assume personal responsibility for learning

met

not met

7. You assess personal learning styles and preferences and apply this knowledge to the learning process

met

not met

8. You access available resources for personal and professional growth

met

not met

9. You develop a two-week action plan

met

not met

10. You incorporate your multiple intelligences into your action plan

met

not met

11. You document how your multiple intelligence impacted improvement met

not met

12. You assume personal responsibility for learning

met

not met

13. You assess personal learning styles and preferences and apply this knowledge to the learning process

met

not met

met

not met

FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
BUILD YOUR CAPACITY FOR LIFE-LONG LEARNING

APPLY CRITICAL THINKING TECHNIQUES
14. You makes decisions considering alternatives and consequences Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

174

Student Learning Plan
Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Thinking Maps [U3C3L1]

Many instructors approach their learners with a variety of strategies to process information. Think about classroom situations you’ve been in. What strategies were used by the instructor to help students
“get it”? Brainstorming, mind-mapping, concept webs and graphic organizers are tools that are often used in the classroom to encourage learning. In this learning plan you will be introduced to Thinking
Maps - a visual tool for the thinking processes. Throughout the lesson you will use the eight Thinking
Maps to enhance your own learning.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Use Thinking Maps to enhance learning
Linked Core Abilities
Apply critical thinking techniques

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your knowledge and skill:
G

by creating a variety of Thinking Maps to use as a course study aid.

Your performance will be successful when:
G

Thinking Map(s) visually depict the appropriate thought process

G

Thinking Map(s) represent content required within one course of study

G

Thinking Map(s) represent all eight thought processes

G

Thinking Map(s) accompanied by a written summary explaining impact on learning

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Identify the types of thinking processes
b. Relate thinking to learning
c. Correlate thinking processes to the eight Thinking Maps
d. Use Thinking Maps to visually depict a learning objective
e. Define key words: analogy, Brace Map, Bridge Map, Circle Map, Bubble Map, Double-bubble Map, Flow
Map, Multi-Flow Map, Relating Factor, Tree Map

175

2

Thinking Maps [U3C3L1]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson.
Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

DEFINE who you are in a visual presentation using any type of visual tool you are familiar with.
[Work independently] INTRODUCE the cadet to the rest of the class using only the visual presentation they provide you. [Work with a partner] VIEW Visual #1: Introduction to Thinking Maps.
COMPARE how Thinking Maps differ from other visual tools. EXAMINE Visual #2: Thought Processes and Thinking Maps. [Work in a large group] REVISE your illustration of yourself by using a Circle Map.
SHARE and VIEW presentations of others using the Circle Map. COMPARE the two visual tools.

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CREATE a visual illustration of who you are and why — qualities, character traits, etc. Use a mind-map, brainstorm, or any typical graphic organizer you are familiar with. SHARE your illustration with someone you know. Could they introduce you and tell a few things about you just by looking at the illustration? VIEW Visual #1: Introduction to Thinking Maps and Visual #2: Thought Processes and
Thinking Maps. Then, COMPARE your illustration the one provided in Exercise #1: Comparing Visual Tools.
RE-CREATE your visual story of yourself using a Circle Map and ADD it next to the illustration you created earlier. NOTE what kinds of differences you observe in your Cadet Notebook.

_____3.

LEARN MORE about Thinking Maps by reading the Introduction to Thinking Maps section in your student text. ANSWER the section review questions. SELECT one of the eight thinking process and
RESEARCH the Thinking Map that addresses the thought process. DRAW and LABEL the key features of the MAP INTRODUCE the Thinking Map to others. Add notes about each Thinking Map using
.
Exercise #2: Note making Guide For Learning Thinking Maps. [Work with a team of 3-6 cadets] VIEW
Visual #3: Secondary School Examples of Thinking Maps.

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 3 independently.

_____5.

COMPLETE Exercise #3: Thinking Map Review. USE an assigned Thinking Map to redefine Thinking
Maps. CONSIDER the thought process you want to address. INCLUDE not only the four basic keys to understanding the power of the maps, but include information from the introduction about how the maps are different from graphic organizers and why they make such a difference in learning. [Work with a team of 3-6 cadets] SHARE and VIEW the presentation.

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRYY OUT Learning Activity 5 independently.

_____7.

EXAMINE a (or SELECT one of your own ) typical high school textbooks used within your school. PREVIEW a small section of the text for key concepts or information. CREATE a Thinking Map to illustrate the concept, skill or knowledge indicated in the text. [Work a team of 3-6 cadets] OBTAIN the Thinking
Maps Assessment Task and Scoring Guide.

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRYY OUT Learning Activity 7 independently.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.
_____2.

176

COMPLETE the Thinking Maps Assessment Task and Scoring Guide. USE your Scoring Guide to self-assess your work. SUBMIT your completed assessment to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Exercise 1: Comparing Visual Tools
Directions: Below is a Double Bubble Map showing the similarities and the differences between graphic organizers and
Thinking Maps. Review the map and note any differences in your Cadet Notebooks.

Based on fundamental thinking skills Based on isolated tasks
Inconsistent
graphic across classrooms Graphic
Organizers
Often static forms Difficult for transferring across disciplines Consistent graphic language for school Visual

Concrete patterns Thinking
Maps
Highly successful Useful for teaching and assessment Usually text or teachercentered

Studentcentered for cooperative learning

Highly flexible forms

Easily transferred across disciplines 177

Exercise 2: Notemaking Guide for Learning Thinking Maps®
Directions: Research the thinking maps listed below. Draw an example of what each Thinking Map looks like and identify the thinking processes used when implementing them. Use the designated area for additional notes based on your research.

Circle Map

Notes:

Looks Like:

THINKING PROCESS:

Bubble Map

Notes:

Looks Like:

THINKING PROCESS:

Double Bubble Map

Notes:

Looks Like:

THINKING PROCESS:

Tree Map
Looks Like:

THINKING PROCESS:

178

Notes:

Brace Map

Notes:

Looks Like:

THINKING PROCESS:

Flow Map

Notes:

Looks Like:

THINKING PROCESS:

Multi-Flow Map

Notes:

Looks Like:

THINKING PROCESS:

Bridge Map

Notes:

Looks Like:

THINKING PROCESS:

179

Exercise 3: Thinking Map® Review

180

Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Using Thinking Maps® Assessment Task [U3C3L1]

Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:
Use Thinking Maps® to enhance learning
Linked Core Abilities

Apply critical thinking techniques

Directions
For this assessment task you will create a variety of Thinking Maps to help you learn necessary skills, attitudes or knowledge within a course of study. Follow the step-by-step directions below.
1. Select a text chapter or course subject that requires for you to retain information, comprehend new concepts or read through quite a bit of content. Select a course that is difficult for you or is taught in a way that conflicts with your own learning style or preference.
2. If possible, create all eight Thinking Maps to help you while you work through the content or skills necessary for your course. You may create as many Thinking Maps as possible for the content - consider them to be a study guide.
3. Write a short summary about how Thinking Maps helped improve learning. Note evidence of this success. 4. Compile the Thinking Maps and written summary into a folder and submit to your instructor.
Use the attached Scoring Guide to self-assess your work.
Submit your completed assessment task to your instructor for evaluation.

181

Using Thinking Maps Scoring Guide
Criteria

Ratings

1. Thinking Map(s) visually depict the appropriate thought process met

not met

2. Thinking Map(s) represent content required within one course of study

met

not met

3. Thinking Map(s) represent all eight thought processes

met

not met

4. Thinking Map(s) accompanied by a written summary explaining impact on learning

met

not met

5. Written product fulfills a clear purpose

met

not met

6. Written product shows evidence of logical critical thinking

met

not met

7. Written product follows prescribed format, meeting criteria for all components

met

not met

8. Written product exhibits correct and appropriate grammar, punctuation, spelling, syntax, and word usage

met

not met

met

not met

FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
APPLY CRITICAL THINKING TECHNIQUES
9. You evaluate sources of information
Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

182

Student Learning Plan
Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Reading for Meaning - Comprehension Strategies
[U3C3L2]

Reading forms the basis of your study skills. An active learner finds information on his or her own through reading. It’s a necessary study skill, but often difficult for many people. Using strategies to help identify word meanings and context meaning of a passage can help improve reading comprehension.
In this learning plan you will examine a variety of reading strategies and vocabulary building strategies designed to help raise your reading comprehension level.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Select reading comprehension strategies to enhance learning
Linked Core Abilities
Apply critical thinking techniques

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your knowledge and skill:


by applying vocabulary building and reading comprehension strategies to assigned readings

Your performance will be successful when:


you define the purpose of a selected reading



you define the hypothesis of a selected reading



you make predictions from a selected reading



you use one of the four reading comprehension strategies to help improve your own reading comprehension



you define the purpose/hypothesis/prediction of the selected reading passage



you use one of the six vocabulary comprehension strategies to enhance your vocabulary skills and help improve your own reading comprehension



you summarize in writing the strategies you selected and how they did or did not help your reading comprehension

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Identify the purposes of reading
b. Distinguish among reading comprehension strategies
c. Distinguish among the types of context clues readers use to determine word meaning
d. Recognize how to apply vocabulary strategies to enhance vocabulary context
e. Relate vocabulary in context strategies to reading comprehension
f. Define key words: analogy, antonym, appositive, comprehension, concept, context, hypothesis, inventory, mood, prediction, properties, purpose, strategy, synonym

183

2

Reading for Meaning - Comprehension Strategies [U3C3L2]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson.
Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

THINK ABOUT your own reading style and habits. COMPLETE the Exercise #4: Thirteen Questions. [Work independently] SHARE your responses with others. [Work in teams of 3-6 cadets] PARTICIPATE in a discussion on the reading strategies people try to use to help reading comprehension, and CREATE a Bubble
Map to show some of the strategies. [Work with the entire class] COMPARE the various Bubble Maps to the “Hints for Difficult Reading” within in the Reading for Meaning section in your student text.

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] COMPLETE Exercise #4: Thirteen Questions and compare your own reading style and habits to those discussed in the “Hints for Difficult Reading” of the Reading for Meaning section within the Study Skills and Test Taking Techniques section of your student text. WRITE a short summary about how your current strategies or habits in reading may be impacting your reading comprehension.

_____3.

LEARN MORE by reading the Reading for Meaning section in your student text. ANSWER the review questions at the end of the section. READ an assigned selection of reading and APPLY one of the
“Reading Comprehension Strategies Practice” exercises provided by your instructor. COMPARE your strategy with others in a Double-Bubble Map. [Work with a team of 3-6 cadets]

_____4.

SHARE any vocabulary building strategies you are aware of or that have worked for you in the past.
LEARN ABOUT the six vocabulary strategies presented in the Reading for Meaning section in your student text. ANSWER the review questions at the end of the section. TEACH others in the classroom about one of the six vocabulary building strategies. OBSERVE presentation on the other five vocabulary strategies. TAKE notes as necessary. [Work in a team of 3-6 cadets]

_____5.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] LEARN MORE about Reading Comprehension and Vocabulary Building strategies by reading Sections 2 and 3 in your text. CREATE a Tree Map to describe each of the four strategies.

_____6.

Use two of the “Vocabulary Strategy” activities provided by your instructor to apply when reading a selected passage of reading. [Work with a team of 3-6 cadets] SHARE positive and negative comments about how useful the strategy can be by posting them on a Vocabulary Stategy Matrix provided by your instructor. REFLECT on which of the strategies you would most likely try to continue to apply to your textbook reading assignments. [Work independently]

_____7.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CHOOSE one of the three reading comprehension strategies and two vocabulary building strategies and apply the step-by-step processes to reading Exercise #11: Major Principles of the Constitution. USE any of the step-by-step Exercises #1-10 to assist you with this activity.

_____8.

APPLY a chosen Reading Comprehension Strategy and one or more Vocabulary Building Strategies from the “Reading Comprehension Strategies Practice” activity options provided by your instructor.
USE one of the strategy activity exercises to assist you in the step-by-step process. WORK through the activity by answering questions as you read the passage. OBTAIN the Reading for Meaning Assessment
Task and Scoring Guide. [Work independently]

_____9.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 8 independently.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

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COMPLETE the Reading for Meaning Performance Task. SELF-ASSESS your work using the Reading for
Meaning Scoring Guide. SUBMIT your completed assessment task to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Exercise 1: Energizer
Directions to Instructor: Give no context, background or introduction for this reading passage!
Just tell cadets that they are to listen carefully and try to figure out what this passage is all about.
When cadets have finished reading the passage, ask cadets what they think the passage is about and how and why they came to that conclusion. Some of your listeners will have no clue what the passage is about; others may think that Tony is trying to escape prison, while others may guess correctly that this is about Tony’s wrestling match.
The idea here is to make cadets aware of the importance of previewing a reading passage before beginning to read so you know what to expect the selection will be about. If you look first at the title, headings, subheadings, pictures, captions under pictures, maps, charts, graphs, sometimes even check out the questions at the end of the selection, you have set some expectations for what you will hear/learn as well as be “tuned in” to what you already know about the topic. This makes you a more active reader/learner, gets you focused on your reading, and improves your reading comprehension.
Note: To make this a more challenging “exercise,” do not read the words in parentheses in the st 1 line, (from the mat). Your more astute listeners may focus on the word “mat” immediately and assume this is about wrestling. You may also decide to make copies just of the passage and give this to cadets to read individually. However, it is much more fun to watch their collectively reactions as you read it aloud!

Tony got up slowly (from the mat), planning his escape. He hesitated a moment and thought. Things were not going well. What bothered him most was being held, especially since the charge against him had been weak. He considered his present situation. The lock that held him was strong, but he thought he could break it. He knew, however, that his timing would have to be perfect. Tony was aware that it was because of his early roughness that he was being penalized so severely – much too severely from his point of view. The situation was becoming frustrating; the pressure had been grinding on him for too long. He was being ridden unmercifully. Tony was getting angry now. He felt he was ready to make his move. He knew that his success or failure would depend on what he did in the next few minutes.
Delivered at reading conference by Richard T. Vacca and Jo Anne L. Vacca

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Exercise 2: Can You Figure Out the Meaning?
Directions: How many times have you come across a word in your reading and you did not know the meaning of the word? You kept reading and discovered you could make a pretty good guess about what that word meant just by reading more. That’s called using context clues to determine the meaning of an unknown or unfamiliar word.
See if you can figure out the meaning of each of the words in bold letters in the following sentences. Write your guess for the meaning of that bold word and then underline the words in the sentences that gave you the clues to make your guess.
1. Numismatics is the study or collecting of coins, medals, or paper money, and people who specialize in this field are called numismatists.
2. An assay is an attempt to evaluate or analyze an ore, alloy, or other mineral to determine the amount of gold, silver or metal contained within it.
3. Many innocent and unsuspecting Africans were victims of cruel, evil, malevolent, and brutal slave traders in the early days of the American colonies.
4. The mayor of this very small town possessed the traits of an honest and just leader: wisdom, judgment, and sagacity.
5. Algae, any one-celled or colonial organisms containing chlorophyll that flourish in water and damp environments and are as abundant in water as grasses are on land, have often been called “grasses of many waters.”
6. Many naïve individuals spend millions of dollars each year as the result of some individual who practices chicanery on them. In other words, foolish people are often tricked into spending their hard-earned money on worthless items by the tricks and sly language of fasttalking salesmen.
7. My great great-grandparents crossed the Mississippi to reach the wide-open country of the unsettled West not in a Conestoga, but in an old farm wagon drawn by one very tired, old horse. 8. A marriage relationship is egalitarian when both partners share responsibilities and make decisions together.
9. A sense of equanimity seemed to surround the room as a feeling of total emotional balance and sense of peace came across my mind after I made what I knew was the right decision.

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Exercise 3: Energizer
Directions:
Give no context, background or introduction for this reading passage! Just tell cadets that they are to listen carefully and try to figure out what this passage is all about.
Note: You’ll need to read carefully and watch for cadets’ reactions. Since you used a similar
Energizer in Lesson 2, your cadets may be more “tuned in” to focusing on the selection because they anticipate this is an effort to try to puzzle them! This passage is much more challenging than the reading passage about Tony’s wrestling match (Lesson 2 Energizer). Many experienced readers/listeners/learners cannot figure out the topic of the selection. They are often baffled by the passage; it does not provide many clues to help determine the what is being described!
When you have finished reading the passage, ask cadets what they think the passage is about and how and why they came to that conclusion. Some of your listeners will have no clue what the passage is about; others may guess correctly that this is about sorting clothes and doing laundry!
The idea here is to once again make cadets aware of the importance of previewing a reading passage before beginning to read so you know what to expect the selection will be about. If you look first at the title, headings, subheadings, pictures, captions under pictures, maps, charts, graphs, sometimes even check out the questions at the end of the selection, you have set some expectations for what you will hear/learn as well as be “tuned in” to what you already know about the topic. This makes you a more active reader/learner, gets you focused on your reading, and improves your reading comprehension. Even though Lesson 3 focuses on vocabulary strategies, previewing the reading passage is still emphasized. Bringing background knowledge and especially the “jargon” of the topic aids in figuring out unknown or unfamiliar words in a reading passage. Note: You may decide to make copies just of the passage and give it to cadets to read individually. However, it is much more fun to watch their collectively reactions as you read it aloud! Reading Passage:
The procedure is quite simple. First you arrange things into different groups. Of course, one pile may be sufficient depending on how much there is to do. If you have to go somewhere else due to lack of facilities, that is the next step; otherwise you are pretty well set. It is important not to overdo things. That is, it is better to do too few things than too many. In the short run, this may not seem important, but complications can arise. A mistake can be expensive. At first, the whole procedure will seem complicated. Soon, however, it will become just another facet of life. It is difficult to foresee any end to the necessity of this task in the immediate future, but then one can never tell. After the procedure is completed, one arranges the materials into different groups again. Then they can be put into their appropriate places. Eventually, they will be used once more and the whole cycle will then have to be repeated. However, that is part of life.

Delivered at reading conference; source unknown.

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Exercise 4: Thirteen-Question Inventory
Directions: Answer the following questions as completely as you can within 4 minutes.

1. What is reading?

2. Name as many “things” as you can that people “read.”

3. Why do you read?

4. Do you read everyday? Why or why not?

5. What do you read?

6. What do you like to read?

7. What don’t you like to read?

8. What do you have trouble reading?

9. Are you a good reader?
10. What exactly do you have trouble with when you read?

11. When you have some difficulty reading, what do you do?

12. When you have some difficulty reading, what do you do to try to solve whatever problem you are having? 13. Why do you need to be a good reader?

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Exercise 5: DR-TA: A Reading Comprehension Strategy
Directions: When you use DR-TA reading comprehension strategy, you predict or define purposes for reading; you read and select relevant data; and you evaluate and revise predictions, using the information you acquire.
Your task is to apply the DR-TA reading comprehension strategy to the U. S. Government textbook reading passage your instructor provided you on a separate handout. As you use the strategy, please write down what you think and do for each of the steps you complete in reading through this passage.
Step-by-Step DR-TA
Step

What I thought and did in this step

1. Set your purpose(s) for reading. Ask yourself,
“From the title, (subtitles, charts, maps, pictures, captions, etc.), what do I think the author will present in this chapter (passage, next pages, etc.) You call this “the writer’s purpose” or your prediction/ hypothesis about what the reading passage is all about. Also, jot down why you think so.

Write your purpose/prediction/hypothesis.

2. Adjust your rate for reading, depending on your purpose(s). If you are reading for specific information, you might quickly skim or scan the reading selection for the specific information you need to find. If you are doing a close reading to learn all about the topic, then you need to read more slowly and carefully, not just look for key words and phrases to answer specific question/find specific information.

Based on the purpose/prediction/hypothesis you identified in Step 1, what rate will you use to read this passage? Explain why you think that this is the purpose/prediction/hypothesis. Why did you choose that reading rate? st How many paragraphs will you read in this 1 chunk?
Explain why you chose this number of paragraphs.

st

3. Read a logical chunk of the reading passage (for example, read the paragraphs under the 1 subheading) to find out if your predictions were right.
4. Accept, reject or redefine your predictions about the reading selection. Note your revised predictions/hypotheses. Do you still have the same purpose for reading?
Write your revised purpose/predictions/hypotheses for st the 1 chunk in this block based on your reading.

5. Continue reading until you reach the end of the selection. Use the same process for the remainder of the reading selection: decide on an appropriate chunk of reading to work on, then

How many paragraphs will you read in this 2

nd

chunk?

Explain why you chose this number of paragraphs.

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Step-by-Step DR-TA predict – read – prove or refine, choose another chunk of reading and repeat the process until you reach the end of the entire reading selection.

nd

6. Do you still have the same purpose for reading this 2 chunk? Write your purpose/prediction and why you nd think that this is the purpose of the 2 chunk of reading.

nd

Read the 2 chunk and then write your revised purpose/predictions/hypotheses in this block, if you need to change your purpose/predictions/hypotheses based on your reading.

7. Continue reading until you reach the end of the selection. Use the same process for the remainder of the reading selection: decide on an appropriate chunk of reading to work on, then predict – read – prove or refine, choose another chunk of reading and repeat the process until you reach the end of the entire reading selection.

rd

How many paragraphs will you read in this 3 chunk?
Explain why you chose this number of paragraphs.

rd

8. Do you still have the same purpose for reading this 3 chunk? Write your purpose/prediction and why you rd think that this is the purpose of the 3 chunk of reading.

rd

Read the 3 chunk and then write your revised purpose/predictions/hypotheses in this block, if you need to change your purpose/predictions/hypotheses based on your reading.

9. Continue reading until you reach the end of the selection. Use the same process for the remainder of the reading selection: decide on an appropriate chunk of reading to work on, then predict – read – prove or refine, choose another chunk of reading and repeat the process until you reach the end of the entire reading selection.

th

How many paragraphs will you read in this 4 chunk?
Explain why you chose this number of paragraphs.

th

10. Do you still have the same purpose for reading this 4 chunk? Write your purpose/prediction and why you th think that this is the purpose of the 4 chunk of reading.

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Step-by-Step DR-TA

th

Read the 4 chunk and then write your revised purpose/predictions/hypotheses in this block, if you need to change your purpose/predictions/hypotheses based on your reading.

11. Continue reading until you reach the end of the selection. Use the same process for the remainder of the reading selection: decide on an appropriate chunk of reading to work on, then predict – read – prove or refine, choose another chunk of reading and repeat the process until you reach the end of the entire reading selection.

th

How many paragraphs will you read in this 5 chunk?
Explain why you chose this number of paragraphs.

th

12. Do you still have the same purpose for reading this 5 chunk? Write your purpose/prediction and why you th think that this is the purpose of the 5 chunk of reading.

th

Read the 5 chunk and then write your revised purpose/predictions/hypotheses in this block, if you need to change your purpose/predictions/hypotheses based on your reading.

13. Continue reading until you reach the end of the selection. Use the same process for the remainder of the reading selection: decide on an appropriate chunk of reading to work on, then predict – read – prove or refine, choose another chunk of reading and repeat the process until you reach the end of the entire reading selection.

th

How many paragraphs will you read in this 6 chunk?
Explain why you chose this number of paragraphs.

th

14. Do you still have the same purpose for reading this 6 chunk? Write your purpose/prediction and why you th think that this is the purpose of the 6 chunk of reading.

th

Read the 6 chunk and then write your revised purpose/predictions/hypotheses in this block, if you need to change your purpose/predictions/hypotheses based on your reading.

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Exercise 6: GIST: A Reading Comprehension Strategy
Directions: In GIST, you focus on short passages (3-5 paragraphs in length) and create summaries of each passage in a very structured step-by-step process. Once you get to the end of your reading assignment, you have really understood the passage and have worked on your writing skills as well. Using this strategy will not only improve your reading comprehension, but will help you in improving your writing skills. Your task is to apply the
GIST reading comprehension strategy to the U.S. Government textbook reading passage your instructor provided you on a separate handout. As you use the strategy, please write down what you think and do for each of the steps you complete in reading through this passage.
Step-by-Step GIST
Step

What I thought and did in this step

1. Chunk your reading assignment into short sections of 3-5 paragraphs in length. Make certain that your short sections are all on the same topic/subtopic so that they make sense when read together. In a science or history textbook, paragraphs under the same subheading will work well together. Note: For this reading passage, you should divide the passage in 3 chunks (5-4-4 paragraphs.) st st
2. Cover all but the 1 paragraph. Read the 1 paragraph.
3. Now, cover the paragraph you just read.
4. Write one statement of 20 words or less that you feel is an accurate summary of the paragraph you just read. You may revise as often as you like. You may look back at the paragraph as often as you like, but you must always cover the paragraph as you write your summary. st 5. Now uncover both the 1 paragraph and the next paragraph in this short section. nd 6. Read the 2 paragraph and write a 20-word or less summary of both paragraphs. Follow same guidelines as in Step #4.
7. Continue following these same steps for reading/covering/writing 20-word summary statements until you have a 20-word written st summary of the 1 of the 3-5 paragraph sections of your reading assignment written in the block to the right. Note: For this assignment, you should have three 20-word summary statements when you are finished. Write your final version st of the 20-word summary statement for the 1 4paragraph chunk of the reading passage in the block to the right. nd 8. Write the 20-word summary statement for the 2
4-paragraph chunk of the reading passage. You st may write your 1 version in this block and then your next and last versions in the block to the right. rd

9. Write the 20-word summary statement for the 3
4-paragraph chunk of the reading passage. st Write your 1 version in this block and your next and last versions in the block to the right.

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Exercise 7: Think-Alouds: A Reading Comprehension Strategy
Directions: Think-Alouds help you monitor your comprehension and apply self-correction strategies to get the most out of your reading. Your task is to apply the Think-Alouds reading comprehension strategy to the U. S. Government textbook reading passage your instructor provided you on a separate handout. As you use the strategy, please write down what you think and do for each of the steps you complete in reading through this passage. Once you complete the reading passage, use the ThinkAlouds checklist to see how well you did.

Step-by-Step Think-Aloud
Step

What I thought and did in this step

1. Look at the title and subtitle(s) of a segment of the reading selection. Make predictions or develop hypotheses about what you anticipate the selection will be about. Write your prediction(s) in the block to the right.
2. Read a segment of the selection and then visualize
(create a picture in your mind) what you are reading.
Describe the picture you see in your mind in the block to the right.
3. Read a little further in the selection and then try to link the new information you are reading with something that is familiar to you. You create an analogy by saying this is “like a ________” (You fill in the blank with something you know about that is similar.)
Write your analogy in the block to the right.
4. When you get to a point in the reading passage that you do not understand or you find confusing, try to identify the problem you have encountered. For example, you might come across a word you do not know. Write any problems you encounter in this passage in the block to the right.

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Step-by-Step Think-Aloud
Step

What I thought and did in this step

5. Use a fix-up strategy. To continue the example in Step
4, read to the end of the sentence that contains the word you do not know and try to figure out what that word might mean. If that strategy does not work, check a dictionary or ask a partner/ teacher. Describe the fix-up strategy you used for the problem(s) you found in the passage in the block to the right. Use the checklist below when you complete the Think-Aloud strategy for this reading passage.
THINK-ALOUDs Checklist
While I was reading, how did I do?
(Put an X in the appropriate box.)
Step in Think-Aloud

Made predictions
Formed picture
Used “like a______”
Found problems
Used fix-ups

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All of the time Much of the time A little bit

Not very much Exercise 8: Reading Comprehension Strategy Practice Handout
Directions: At the end of these directions you will find a reading passage typical of a U. S.
Government textbook. Your task is to choose one of the following three reading comprehension strategies and use it to read this passage: DR-TA, Think-Alouds or GIST. As you use the strategy, please write down what you think and do for each of the steps you complete in reading through this passage. Steps for each strategy are listed on separate handouts.
THE MAKING OF THE CONSTITUTION
Classifying Governments
There are several ways to classify governments. The most used system derives from the
Greek philosopher Aristotle. In this system, governments belong to one of three groups: autocracy, oligarchy, or democracy.
Autocracy is a system of government in which the power and authority to rule are in the hands of a single individual. Throughout history, the most frequently occurring form of autocracy is a monarchy. Monarchs usually acquire their realms by inheritance and their subjects customarily address them by the title of king or queen. Although some nations still use this system of government today, many of these heads of state have lost all or a part of their power to rule. In the following picture, Queen Elizabeth I (1533 - 1603) was one of the strongest rulers in
English history. Her rule ended just prior to the American experience, which began in 1607 when
England founded its first permanent colony at Jamestown, Virginia. Another form of autocracy is dictatorship. Dictators gain power through their skills and abilities rather than inheritance.
Oligarchy is a system of government in which a small elite group holds power. The source of power is usually wealth, control of the military, social position, or some combination of these. The former Soviet Union was a recent example of an oligarchy. A small group of leaders still rules China. The most prevalent form of oligarchy is aristocracy. Aristocrats also inherit their positions. They hold governmental and economic power and claim superiority over the “common people.” Democracy is a system of government in which the people rule. It may take one of two forms, direct democracy or representative (indirect) democracy. Direct democracy is possible only in a relatively small society where citizens can meet together regularly to decide key issues and solve problems. Representative democracy allows for the election of officials who represent the people in carrying out the duties and responsibilities of the government. Virtually all democracies with large populations are representative democracies, with the United States and
Great Britain as two of the oldest.
During the 1600s, people from many countries came to the “New World” to establish their home, obtain political and religious freedom, and make their fortune. As the English populated the thirteen colonies along the east coast, they established their own independent governments -each fashioned after the ideas, political experiences, and beliefs they brought with them. These same factors governed England for centuries.
The English Contribution
As political systems matured, governments incorporated new ideas.
Notable
philosophers came on the scene to spur the people in their pursuit for freedom from the one-man rule -- the main political system for centuries.

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In 1651, Thomas Hobbes suggested in his book, Leviathan, the idea of a social contract between individuals. His writing stressed that before governments, men lived in a “state of nature” where they had complete freedom to do as they pleased, provided they were powerful and resourceful enough to do so. His social contract theory presented a bleak picture of human life as “nasty, brutish, and short.” He argued that government must be strong, and even repressive, to keep people from lapsing into a savage existence. Although denounced in his day, this book had a continuing influence on western political thought.
James Harrington was a political theorist who published the book Oceana in 1656. He argued that there were only two types of governments: either a government of men, not of laws, or one of laws and not of men. If men controlled the government, the result was tyranny because powerful individuals would rule without restriction. However, in a government controlled by laws, government officials would be subject to all of society’s rules and they could not tyrannize their fellow human beings.
John Locke, another English philosopher, published Two Treaties of Civil Government in
1690. Contradicting Hobbes, Locke maintained that the original state of nature was happy and characterized by reason and tolerance. He argued that all human beings were born free and equal to pursue “life, health, liberty, and possessions.” It was the responsibility of the state, formed by the social contract and guided by natural law, to guarantee those rights. If governments failed to protect those “natural rights,” then people could change the government.
His writings and ideas were a major influence on political thought during that period. Although the king did not agree with his ideas, the newly emerging American colonies readily accepted them.
Additionally, the policy Locke set down on checks and balances later became a part of the U.S.
Constitution.
The French Contribution
The spirit of freedom was not just confined to England. Other countries emerged from centuries of serfdom (a system of hereditary submission of slaves or serfs who lived and worked on the land of their lords) to place their stamp on the growing movement for freedom.
Baron de Montesquieu, a French political philosopher, published The Spirit of the Laws in
1748 (only 28 years prior to the Declaration of Independence). His ideas involved the separation of powers among three separate branches of government. Under his plan, the legislative branch
(parliament) would pass the laws, the executive branch (the king) would enforce them, and the judicial branch would settle disputes that arose as the government enforced them. Although previous theorists suggested separating the legislative branch from the executive branch,
Montesquieu was the first to suggest an independent judiciary. His ideas were an effort to prevent the concentration of power in the hands of a few.
Jean Jacques Rousseau, who was born in Switzerland but considered to be a French political philosopher, took his cue from Locke. Rousseau wrote The Social Contract in 1762, which contributed to the thought and debate of the times with his views on freedom of the individual and the shape of government. He believed that all human beings in a state of nature were born free. Therefore, he proposed that the main duty of government, preferably a direct democracy, was to compromise the freedom of nature with the necessary order of a civilized, stable society.
America created an environment where democratic reforms and political theories could emerge. Although there were Spanish and French settlements in North America, the people who lived in the original 13 colonies that later became the United States were English. Thus, it was
English practices, as well as English and French ideas about government, that found their way into the “New World” -- a world that was ideally suited to nurture and develop those practices and ideas. Consequently, the American leaders who wrote the Declaration of Independence and the
Constitution knew well the political ideas of these five individuals.

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Exercise 9: Using Context Clues:
A Vocabulary Strategy to Improve Reading Comprehension
Note: Using Context Clues
When you use context clues to try to figure out what an unknown or unfamiliar word means as you read, you use information surrounding that difficult word to help reveal its meaning. Do you remember the types of context clues you can use? Here is a list to jog your memory:
Definitions
Linked synonyms
Direct description (examples, modifiers, restatements)
Contrast (antonym or phrase that is opposite in meaning)
Cause-and-effect
Mood and tone
Directions:
Your task is to use context clues to unlock the meanings of unknown or unfamiliar words and improve your understanding of what you read.
Your instructor provided you a handout of a U. S. Government textbook reading passage. As you read through this passage and use context clues, you will find bold words that are numbered #1 #10. In the appropriate cells in the table below, please write what you think the definition of the bold/numbered word is and what you thought and did to figure out the word’s meaning. Using Context Clues
What I think the meaning of the word is

What I thought and did to figure out the meaning of the word

Set your purpose(s) for reading. Ask yourself, “From the title, (subtitles, charts, maps, pictures, captions, etc.), what do I think the author will present in this chapter
(passage, next pages, etc.) You call this
“the writer’s purpose” or what this reading passage is all about. Also, jot down why you think this is the author’s purpose. Write your purpose/prediction/hypothesis.

Explain why you think that this is the purpose for the reading passage.

1. overcentralization

2. decentralization

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Using Context Clues
What I think the meaning of the word is

What I thought and did to figure out the meaning of the word

3. lucrative

4. unanimously

5. credibility

6. eloquent

7. bicameral

8. sovereignty

9. prevail

10. levying

Continue on the back of this page, if necessary.

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Exercise 10: Dictionary as a Strategic Resource A Vocabulary Strategy to Improve Reading Comprehension
Note: Using the Dictionary
When you use the dictionary as a strategic resource to verify the meaning of a word, you learn the precise meaning(s) of that word. You use the dictionary only after you have tried whatever other techniques you know to try to unlock the meaning of that unfamiliar or unknown word.
Directions:
Your task is to use whatever you already know about how to figure out the meaning of a word you’re not sure of and then use the dictionary to verify if your “educated guess” is correct. A dictionary helps you learn the precise meanings of unknown or unfamiliar words and improves your understanding of what you read.
Your instructor provided you a handout of U. S. Government textbook reading passage. As you read through this passage, you will find bold words that are numbered #1 - #10. In the appropriate cells in the table below, please write what you think the meaning of the bold/numbered word is and then use a dictionary to verify your “educated guess.” Write the meaning that “fits” the reading passage in the cell opposite the word and your “educated guess” of its meaning.

Using Context Clues
What I think the meaning of the word is

Set your purpose(s) for reading. Ask yourself, “From the title, (subtitles, charts, maps, pictures, captions, etc.), what do I think the author will present in this chapter
(passage, next pages, etc.) You call this
“the writer’s purpose” or what this reading passage is all about. Also, jot down why you think this is the author’s purpose. Dictionary meaning of the word that “fits” the reading passage
Write your purpose/prediction/hypothesis.

Explain why you think that this is the purpose for the reading passage.

1. overcentralization

2. decentralization

3. lucrative

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Using Context Clues
What I think the meaning of the word is

Dictionary meaning of the word that “fits” the reading passage

4. unanimously

5. credibility

6. eloquent

7. bicameral

8. sovereignty

9. prevail

10. levying

Continue on the back of this page, if necessary.

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Exercise 11: Visual Imaging A Vocabulary Strategy to Improve Reading Comprehension
Note: Using visual Imaging
When you use visual imaging, you think of a “keyword” that either looks or sounds like the word whose meaning you are trying to learn. Thinking of that picture of the look-alike word and/or the image will help you remember the word and its meaning.
Example: A science class is studying a unit on minerals and students must remember the names and primary uses of each mineral. Amber is a mineral that is used primarily in the home. The class decides that the word hamburger sounds like amber, so they create an image in their heads (and actually draw it on a flashcard) of a hamburger sitting on a living room chair. Every time they see that image in their heads, they remember that amber is a mineral that is used primarily in the home.
Directions:
Your task is to use visual imaging to help you remember words and their meaning(s) and expand your vocabulary.
Your instructor provided you a handout of a U. S. Government textbook reading passage. As you read through this passage, you will find words that are numbered #1 - #10. Please consult a dictionary and in the appropriate cells in the table below, write the definition of the bold/numbered word that fits the meaning of that word as it is used in the reading passage. In the cell across from the word and its definition, write a look-alike word and either draw or describe an image you think will help you remember the word and its meaning.

Using Visual Imaging to Remember Words and their Definitions
The meaning of the word as used in the passage Set your purpose(s) for reading. Ask yourself, “From the title, (subtitles, charts, maps, pictures, captions, etc.), what do I think the author will present in this chapter
(passage, next pages, etc.) You call this
“the writer’s purpose” or what this reading passage is all about. Also, jot down why you think this is the author’s purpose. A look-alike word and image that aids my memory Write your purpose/prediction/hypothesis.

Explain why you think that this is the purpose for the reading passage.

1. overcentralization

2. decentralization

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Using Visual Imaging to Remember Words and their Definitions
The meaning of the word as used in the passage 3. lucrative

4. unanimously

5. credibility

6. eloquent

7. bicameral

8. sovereignty

9. prevail

10. levying

Continue on the back of this page, if necessary.

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A look-alike word and image that aids my memory Exercise 12: Word Structure:
A Vocabulary Strategy to Improve Reading Comprehension
Note: Using Word Structure
When you use a word’s structure, you can predict its meaning. You can make a pretty good guess at the meaning of a word if you examine the word’s various parts. Do you remember the 2 types of words that will work with this strategy?
Examples:
1. Compound words made up of two known words joined together: commonwealth, matchmaker 2. Words that contain a root or stem word that you recognize and which have a prefix or suffix attached: surmountable, deoxygenize, microscope
Directions:
Your task is to use context clues to unlock the meanings of unknown or unfamiliar words and improve your understanding of what you read. Your instructor provided you a handout of a U. S.
Government textbook reading passage.
As you read through this passage, you will find bold words that are numbered #1 - #10. Only 2 of those words can be figured out using the word structure strategy. In cells numbered #1 and #2 in the table below, please write what you think the definition of the bold/numbered word is and how you figured out the word’s meaning by using word structure. Continue reading the passage and find 8 additional words in the passage where a reader could figure out the word’s meaning by using word structure. It is OK if you know the meaning of the words you find; the idea is to see if you can use this kind of strategy if you need it!

Using Word Structure
What I think the meaning of the word is

Set your purpose(s) for reading. Ask yourself, “From the title, (subtitles, charts, maps, pictures, captions, etc.), what do I think the author will present in this chapter
(passage, next pages, etc.) You call this
“the writer’s purpose” or what this reading passage is all about. Also, jot down why you think this is the author’s purpose. What I did with word structure to figure out the meaning Write your purpose/prediction/hypothesis.

Explain why you think that this is the purpose for the reading passage.

1. overcentralization

2. decentralization

205

Using Word Structure
What I think the meaning of the word is

What I did with word structure to figure out the meaning 3. lucrative

4. unanimously

5. credibility

6. eloquent

7. bicameral

8. sovereignty

9. prevail

10. levying

Continue on the back of this page, if necessary.

206

Exercise 13: Personal Word Lists:
A Vocabulary Strategy to Improve Reading Comprehension
Note: Creating Personal Word Lists
When you create a personal word list, you not only expand your vocabulary in general, but when you use this strategy with your textbook reading assignments, the personal word list also helps you remember key concepts for the chapter or unit you are studying in that subject. There are 4 steps to creating your personal word list. (1) You identify or often your instructor identifies the important words you need to know to really understand and learn the subject you are studying. (2) You try to figure out what each word means, usually from the way it is used in your textbook reading assignment. (3) You make a list of the context or structure clues that helped you make an “educated guess” about the meaning of the words. (4) Finally, you check the dictionary to make certain your definition is the correct one.
Directions:
Your task is to create a personal word list so that you can learn the meanings of unknown or unfamiliar words, improve your understanding of what you read in this passage, and expand your vocabulary. Your instructor provided you handout of a U. S. Government textbook reading passage. As you read through this passage, you will find bold words that are numbered #1 - #10. In the appropriate cells in the table below, please create a personal word list for these 10 words.

Before you begin reading any passage, you set your purpose(s) for reading. Ask yourself,
“From the title, (subtitles, charts, maps, pictures, captions, etc.), what do I think the author will present in this chapter (passage, next pages, etc.) You call this “the writer’s purpose” or what this reading passage is all about. Also, jot down why you think this is the author’s purpose.

Write your purpose for this reading passage:

Explain why you think that this is the purpose for this reading passage.

207

Creating a Personal Word List
Word

What I think the word means 1. overcentralization

2. decentralization

3. lucrative

4. unanimously

5. credibility

6. eloquent

7. bicameral

8. sovereignty

9. prevail

10. levying

Continue on the back of this page, if necessary.

208

Clues (Context or
Structure)

Dictionary
Definition

209

Comparisons

Key Word or Concept

Category
What is it?

Illustrations
What are some examples?

Properties
What is it like?

When you use word mapping, you are actually organizing the important concepts of the reading selection and at the same time defining a particular word. In word mapping, you, or more frequently your instructor, identify a key word(s) or concept central to understanding the content of a reading passage, often a whole chapter in your textbook. Very often you use this strategy as a whole class or in small groups, but you can also do this on your own. Once you select the word(s), you create a basic structure for your word map, allowing plenty of space to expand your map. A word map looks essentially like this:

Note: Word Mapping

Exercise 14: Word Mapping A Vocabulary Strategy to Improve Reading Comprehension

210

Detroit

Lion

Panther

Bobcat

Bengal

Tiger

Feline

See the example word map below:

Siberian

Tannish yellow w/black stripes

Wild

Fierce

5. Finally, write in at least 3 properties in the ovals to the right of the key word oval. These answer the question, “What is it like?”

4. Next, write several comparisons (preferably 3) in the ovals to the left of the key word oval. These additional concepts or key words belong to the same general category, but are different from the concept or key word studied.

3. Then, you write in at least 3 examples or illustrations of the key word or concept in the polygons underneath the key word oval.

2. Write the word that is the general class or category to which your key word belongs in the rectangle at the top of your map. This answers the question, “What is it?”

1. Writing the key word or concept in the center oval.

You complete your word map by doing the following:

211

For this activity, you will word map two key words – government and constitution – that will help you understand/learn/remember the important concepts the author wants you to know about the subject of this reading passage. Create the word map for government on this page. On the back of this sheet of paper, create the key word map for constitution. You may work with a partner or form a triad with 2 other cadets, but each of you must create word maps for this activity.

Instructors will sometimes build word maps with you before you begin your reading, and sometimes ask you to create them after you read. When you create word maps on your own, experiment with which works best for you – creating the word map before or after you read a reading passage. Your instructor provided you a handout of a U. S. Government textbook reading passage. Try creating your word maps first and then read the textbook passage. Creating the word map first will get you thinking about what you already know about governments and constitutions. Once you’ve read the passage, you may add additional information that you learned in your reading to your word maps.

Directions:

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212

Exercise 15: Major Principles of the Constitution
To Form A More Perfect Union
Introduction
Reacting to the centralized control of Great Britain over trade, taxes, and troops, the authors of the Articles of Confederation denied their new national government effective control over those matters. Just as (1) overcentralization proved to be the undoing of the British Empire in the
American colonies, so did excessive (2) decentralization lead to the failure of America’s first effort to deal with national-state relationships. The Constitutional Convention provided the nation’s political leaders with one more opportunity to devise a workable document that would satisfy the interests of the national government, state governments, and the American people.
The Philadelphia Convention
The Constitutional Convention met on May 25, 1787, in the Philadelphia State House. Every state sent delegates -- except Rhode Island, which was fearful that national legislation would injure its (3) lucrative trade. However, some of the participating states gave their delegates specific instructions. For example, Delaware did not want its delegates supporting any proposal that would deny a state equal representation in Congress. Other states instructed their delegates only to consider amendments to the Articles of Confederation.
A profile of the delegates reflects the following significant qualities of these individuals:









Thirty-nine of the 55 served in the Confederation Congress.
Seven were governors of their state.
Eight helped write their state constitutions.
Two signed the Articles of Confederation.
Eight signed the Declaration of Independence.
Half had college degrees and many were well read in governmental policies.
They were prosperous merchants, lawyers, bankers, plantation owners, or doctors.
They were leading citizens of their time -- notable among them were George Washington,
Benjamin Franklin (at age 81 the oldest delegate), and James Madison.

Familiar with the ideas of Hobbes, Harrington, Locke, Montesquieu, and Rousseau, most of the delegates were in favor of a stronger national government. They (4) unanimously elected
George Washington to preside over the meetings. Delegates felt his influence throughout the sessions and his presence inspired public confidence. Benjamin Franklin’s great reputation as a patriot, diplomat, scholar, writer, publisher, scientist, and inventor also increased the Convention’s
(5) credibility. James Madison, often called the “Father of the Constitution,” kept careful notes on everything that took place. Most of what we know about the delegates and the proceedings comes from those notes.
Alexander Hamilton stood virtually alone in favoring the adoption of a British system of extreme centralization. His proposals, despite (6) eloquent pleas and arguments, died a quick death on the floor. Additionally, none of the delegates had any sentiment for preserving absolutely intact the extreme decentralization of the Articles.
Although the delegates avoided these two extremes, they differed on issues pertaining to:




The division of political power
The scope of the functions the states would entrust to the national government
The kinds of controls that the two levels of government could exercise over each other’s activities 213



The very basis of authority over the national government; that is, should it represent the people of the whole nation or should the states remain as sovereign units possessing ultimate legal authority? This issue was the most fundamental source of disagreement.

Virginia Vs. New Jersey Plans
The delegates introduced two plans that reflected opposing attitudes on these issues. The
Virginia Plan (so named because Governor Randolph of Virginia introduced it) represented the
“Nationalist” point of view. The New Jersey Plan (proposed by William Paterson of that state) represented the “Federalist” viewpoint.
THE VIRGINIA PLAN
Favored a strong central government supported by larger states.
The national government could do the following:


Legislate when states were “incompetent” to do so or when their legislature would interfere with the “harmony” of the U.S.



Negate, or veto any state law it deemed contrary to the national constitution.

Called for a (7) bicameral legislature with a House of Representatives elected by popular vote
(based on population and wealth) and a Senate elected by the House.
Called for a single executive:


The national legislature would choose the national executive.



The national legislature would appoint a national judiciary.

(Note: The national executive and judiciary would have limited veto power over the national legislature.) THE NEW JERSEY PLAN
Committed to protecting state’s (8) sovereignty supported by smaller states:
States could do the following:


Sought to make only limited changes to the Articles of Confederation.



Granted power to the national government to act against any states that failed to obey national laws, but the national government could not exercise those powers without the consent of an indefinite number of states.

Called for a unicameral legislature with each state having one vote (equal representation) regardless of population or wealth.
Called for a plural executive whereby the executive branch would consist of more than one person: •

The national legislature would elect the plural executive, but a request of the majority of the governors could remove them.



The plural executive could appoint a judiciary with limited powers.

The delegates bitterly fought over these differences, and for a time it seemed that the convention would fail. Deadlocked over the question of representation in the national legislature, neither the
Nationalists nor the Federalists had sufficient support to (9) prevail. The Virginia Plan posed a threat to the smaller states whereas the New Jersey Plan was unacceptable to the larger states.

214

The Connecticut Compromise
The convention remained deadlocked until a third group, the “Unionists” or Committee of
Eleven, devised a “Great Compromise” to break the deadlock. Named after the Connecticut delegation that had the leading role in developing the compromise, the Connecticut Compromise sought to preserve the union of the states. This plan called for an upper house (or Senate) in which each state had two members and an equal vote (satisfying those who favored the New
Jersey Plan) and a lower house (or the House of Representatives) with representation based on the state’s population (satisfying those who favored the Virginia Plan). Not only solving the largestate and small-state conflicts, this plan also met the sovereignty issue by proposing that the national government represent both the people and the state governments. The Connecticut
Compromise also contained the following provisions.


As a precaution against having to assume the financial burdens of the smaller states, the plan stated that revenue bills would originate only in the House, where the more populated states had greater representation.



The Southern states won a major point on slavery. Since almost one-third of the population of those states were black slaves, the Southern states wanted the slaves counted for purposes of representation in the House, but not for the purpose of (10) levying taxes. The
Northern states, which had few slaves, wanted them counted for tax purposes, but not for representation. The agreement reached was that a state could count three-fifths of the black slaves within its borders for both taxes and representation.



The Southern states, which were not as populated as the Northern states, also feared that giving Congress the power to regulate trade might adversely affect their economy. The
Southern states mainly exported tobacco, cotton, rice, and indigo, and dealt in slave trading.
Although the compromise gave Congress the power to regulate interstate and foreign trade, it prohibited them from placing taxes on any exports and protected the slave trade for twenty years after adoption of the new Constitution.



Concerning the election of the executive, or president, the delegates agreed that an electoral college, composed of electors from each of the states, would elect the president. Each state would have an electoral vote equal to the number of its members of the House plus its two senators. On September 12, 1787, the convention concluded the work of writing the Constitution and gave the completed draft to a committee to style and polish the language. Governor Morris of
Pennsylvania was responsible for the notable literary quality of the Constitution. Then, on
September 17, 1787, 39 delegates signed the Constitution and sent it to the Congress of the
Confederation. The other delegates opposed the document or were absent.

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216

Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Reading for Meaning Assessment Task [U3C3L2]

Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:
Select reading comprehension strategies to enhance learning
Linked Core Abilities

Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques
Apply critical thinking techniques

Directions
For this Assessment Task you are to select at least one Reading Comprehension Strategy and at least two
Vocabulary Building Strategies to apply while doing at least three assigned high school reading assignments throughout one week. Use the appropriate step-by-step activity sheets with each assignment.
Summarize the effectiveness of each strategy and note whether you found the strategy effective describing why or why not.
Use the Reading for Meaning Scoring Guide to self-assess your work before submitting it. The performance criteria will guide you toward meeting the expectations for the assessment.
Compile the three completed activity sheets and three written summaries together and place in a folder or binder. Submit the completed binder of material and your Scoring Guide to your instructor for evaluation.

217

Reading for Meaning Scoring Guide
Criteria

Ratings

1. You apply reading comprehension strategies to at least three homework reading assignments

met

not met

2. You define the purpose of a selected reading

met

not met

3. You define the hypothesis of a selected reading

met

not met

4. You make predictions from a selected reading

met

not met

5. You use one of the four reading comprehension strategies to help improve your own reading comprehension

met

not met

6. You use two of the six vocabulary comprehension strategies to enhance your vocabulary skills and help improve your own reading comprehension

met

not met

7. You use the step-by-step instructions included with each activity

met

not met

8. You summarize in writing the strategies you selected and how they did or did not help your reading comprehension

met

not met

9. You compile all completed activities and summaries into a presentation binder for evaluation

met

not met

10. Written product fulfills a clear purpose

met

not met

11. Written product shows evidence of logical critical thinking

met

not met

12. Written product follows prescribed format, meeting criteria for all components met

not met

13. written product exhibits correct and appropriate grammar, punctuation, spelling, syntax, and word usage

met

not met

FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
COMMUNICATE USING VERBAL, NON-VERBAL, VISUAL, AND WRITTEN TECHNIQUES
14. You apply appropriate reading strategies

met

not met

15. You use problem solving skills in academic and/or work place environments met

not met

met

not met

APPLY CRITICAL THINKING TECHNIQUES
16. You evaluate sources of information
Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

218

Student Learning Plan
Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Study Habits that Work for You [U3C3L3]

Good study skills support being efficient, being effective, and performing well on tests. It also includes identifying resources, taking good notes and researching information. These skills get you through the basics and get you where you ultimately want to be in your life. As an active learner, you do not just use study techniques for homework. You must use them throughout all of life - whether attempting to get your driver’s license, preparing for the college SATs, or seeking advancement opportunities in the military. In this learning plan, you will review your own learning preferences, identify new study techniques and strategies, and develop a personal plan for more effective studying.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Develop personal study and test-taking strategies
Linked Core Abilities
Apply critical thinking techniques

Build your capacity for life-long learning

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your knowledge and skill:
G

by applying study skill and test-taking strategies to several courses

Your performance will be successful when:
G

you acknowledge a personal study skill weakness

G

you apply one or more study skill strategies to various courses within your high school course of study over a two-week timespan

G

you apply one or more test-taking strategies over a two-week timespan

G

you record the results of your applications

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Relate personal learning preferences to study habits
b. Identify effective study skill strategies
c. Evaluate test preparation strategies
d. Distinguish among various note-taking tips and strategies
e. Define the key words: allocate, aural/auditory, compare, criticize, contrast, efficient, enumerate, inference, interpret, justify, paraphrase, priority, prove

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2

Study Habits that Work for You [U3C3L3]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson.
Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

THINK ABOUT your own study habits and test-taking skills. [Work with a partner] CREATE a MultiFlow Map relating your existing study habits to your testing outcomes. [Work with 3-6 cadets] DISCUSS study habits and test-taking techniques you currently have, would like to change, or desire to learn more about. SHARE your ideas in a KWL Chart. REFLECT on your own learning style or preference and how it impacts your study time. [Work independently]

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 1 independently.

_____3.

BRAINSTORM the types of study situations or test scenarios and how they relate to each of the eight study skills indicated in your text. [Work with a partner] SHARE your examples with others. LEARN
MORE about Study Skills by reading about “Study Habits That Work For You” in Section 3, Chapter 3 of your text. GIVE a short presentation about one of the study techniques addressed. [Work with team of
3-6 cadets] OBSERVE presentation on the other five study skill strategies.

_____4.

THINK ABOUT a test you will soon be taking within another high school course of study. What kind of test will it be — multiple choice, fill in the blank, short answer, or essay? LEARN MORE about the type of test that seems to be hardest for you to be successful with by reading about “Test-Taking Techniques” in
Section 3 of Chapter 3 in your text. COMPLETE Exercise #4: Test-Taking. PRESENT to other teams in your class your test-taking strategy tips in a graphic organizer of your choice. OBSERVE the presentations of others. TAKE notes as necessary. ANSWER the review questions at end of this section.

_____5.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 4 independently. PREPARE a Thinking Map of your choice for each study skill strategy and an example of a situation it can be used with.

_____6.

WRITE a scenario about a specific study problem or test-taking problem using Exercises #2 and/or #5:
Scenario Activity. CREATE a solution card containing a study skill or test-taking strategy you think is most appropriate for the problem described in the scenario. [Work with a team of 3-6 cadets] PLAY a quiz show using the scenarios and solution cards. [Work together with entire class]

_____7.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 6 independently.

_____8.

SELECT recommendations and solutions to presented study situations by completing Exercise #3: Study
Strategy and Exercise #6: Test-Taking Strategies. [Work independently] USE a Multi-Flow Map to help relate study skill factors or hindrances to intended outcomes. [Work with a partner.] SHARE your findings with others in the class. REVIEW the solutions presented. ADD responses to the reflection questions to your Cadet Notebook. OBTAIN the Brain Structure and Function Assessment Task and Scoring Guide.
OBTAIN the Study Habits That Work For You Assessment Task and Scoring Guide.

_____9.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 8 independently. SUBMIT your work to your instructor for feedback and a grade.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

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COMPLETE the Study Habits that Work for You Assessment Task. SELF-ASSESS your work using the
Study Habits that Work for You Scoring Guide. SUBMIT your completed assessment task to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Exercise 1: Energizer
Directions (To Instructor): Write each of the following statements on a sheet of chart paper.
Post them one by one as you read them aloud to cadets.
Ask cadets to raise their hand if the following statement applies:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.

Put things together by reading a set of instructions.
Take notes on what you read or hear.
Look for information that a speaker or instructor repeats and write it down in your notes.
Have someone read the directions to you while you put something together.
Read a textbook or directions aloud.
Ask someone to explain something to you after you’ve heard someone speak or tried to read a difficult piece of text.
Pay little or no attention to instructions or a manual and instead follow a diagram to put something together.
Read the title of a chapter before you begin to read your text.
Look for headings and subheadings before you read a lesson of your textbook.
Really enjoy studying.
Would rather mow 2 lawns or babysit the neighborhood brat for 3 hours rather than study.

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Exercise 2: Scenario Activity
Directions: Each team selects one of the following scenarios:
Note: In response to one of the scenarios, each team is to either write a public service announcement or design a pamphlet that advocates the use of the test taking tips and strategies listed in the requirements for each scenario.
The public service announcement should be limited to 3 minutes in length and should include not only the text of the service announcement (which must be grammatically correct and exhibit correct spelling and punctuation), but also at least 3 graphics/visuals or a description of video clips to accompany it.
The pamphlet must be a tri-fold and should include at least 3 graphics/visuals. Text must be neatly printed/typed and easy to read. All text must be grammatically correct and exhibit correct spelling and punctuation. Scenario 1
Your friend Mike hates essay questions. He is never sure when he has written enough. He runs out of time and doesn’t get all the questions answered even though he knows the answers. He feels the same for the short answer tests. Directions that ask him to “criticize,” “illustrate,” or “interpret” often confuse him.
Requirements: Explain the major points to him: how to write a concise essay or short answer, what kind of facts he is expected to supply, how to allocate his time or pace himself during a test.
Define “criticize,” “illustrate,” and “interpret” for him.
Scenario 2
You are an A student, so your sister Jan wants you to advise her on multiple choice and reading comprehension questions. What can she do if she really doesn’t know an answer on a multiple choice question? How can she make a good guess? She says she is too slow on reading comprehension tests. Are there any tips you can give her?
Requirements: Choose at least 5 techniques on attacking multiple choice questions to explain to her. On comprehension questions, tell her how she can best deal with the main idea, detail and inference type questions; give her a strategy for assessing how much time to spend on questions on reading passages.
Scenario 3
A fellow cadet has a really bad case of test anxiety. Amanda often feels almost physically sick, she gets so upset at the idea of even having to take a test. One of her biggest fears is the vocabulary on standardized tests. Explain what she can do to relieve some or most of her test anxiety. Also, arm her with some strategies for dealing with vocabulary questions.
Requirements: Explain all the strategies for alleviating test anxiety. What can she do to create a study plan? What should she do the day before and the day of a test? Explain how to determine words using context clues, how to use POE to zero in on the correct answer, what to do with the 3 types of words on tests, how to make the most out of your knowledge of prefixes, roots and suffixes. Include long-term strategies for expanding her vocabulary.
Scenario 4
Your JROTC instructor has asked you to assist in working with the more junior cadets who are taking a Computer Assisted Test (CAT) for the first time. Not only is the test format and the way a cadet works through the CAT a new and unfamiliar experience for these junior cadets, your instructor is convinced these cadets are not really certain how to study for a CAT – or any test for that matter! Help these junior cadets do their best.
Requirements: Explain how to create a study, plan and how to prepare in advance and on the day of a test. Also, explain how a CAT is different from other types of tests but also how you can use some of the same test taking tips and strategies used in other tests.

222

Exercise 3: Study Strategy
Cadet’s Name
Date Assignment is due

Today’s Date
Date of next test

Directions: Carefully read the contents of the table below. In the “What I Will Do?” column, in the block on the same line as each Factor, Ask and Recommendations block, indicate what you will do in answer to the questions, and what you will do with the recommendations. In other words, will you do what is recommended or do you have other plans as part of your study strategy?

Factor
Set good conditions Ask

Recommendations
Go to school earlier.

What is outside of my control? Make time to study What can I control? Study at the library.

How can I use my time efficiently? What I Will Do?

Keep materials together. Be ready to start then you can use small blocks of time.

Get up earlier.

Know your priorities. Don’t put off studying t o the last minute.
Do the hardest homework first when you start, when motivation is highest. Identify resources Am I making use of all possible resources?

Use the library (public and school library). Ask if they have a study skills center, internet access, or any special materials.
Access homework help sites on the
Internet.
Ask the librarian for help.
Use the people you know: teacher, friend, classmate, study group, church members, brother or sister.

Apply reading skills Which of my reading skills apply to studying and doing homework?

Apply all the reading skills to studying. Read all homework assignments.
Scan and skim the materials first.
Read the headings to get an overview. Be sure you understand all the vocabulary used in the material you read. Use SQ3R for textbook reading/notetaking/studying. 223

Factor
Take notes

Ask
How can I take good notes? Recommendations
List in your mind or vocalize the major points. Recall facts and concepts in your mind.
Write notes but write only enough detail to understand. Don’t copy from the textbook.
Decide what details are important.
Use a graphic organizer to outline the material.
Record questions.
Summarize to yourself. Use your own words.
Mark the material as you read, if permitted. Use a strategy: Read and mark text as you go, if you are allowed to mark up your textbooks. If not, write out/create a graphic organizer on the key pieces on information you need to remember. What do I look for as I read or study? Get the big picture. Start with the table of contents, then look at headings, and subheadings
Start to ask yourself: what are the big questions this material answers? Pick out topic sentences as you read; mark core concepts with a colored marker or jot them down in your notebook
Locate the secondary concepts, underline/jot down in your notes
Locate essential facts and details
Underline definitions and keywords/jot down in your notes
Draw a box around difficult words.
Jot down difficult words in your notes. Use the dictionary to find the meaning when you cannot determine it from context, or to confirm your understanding.
Locate the conclusion statement and any summary statements
Stop and recall chunks as you go.
If you cannot understand the material as you read, go back and read it again. However, read to the end first. Do not give up. The meaning may become clear as you have more information.

224

What I Will Do?

Exercise 4: Test Taking
Directions: Each team is to read the appropriate lesson of their text and any other available/appropriate resources. Each team is to gather the test taking tips and strategies and decides how best to display and present the information to the whole class. You may choose to create a chart or the graphic organizer most appropriate for displaying the required information.


For topic on question types (how to attack multiple choice) you must include "attractive distractors," how to use punctuation/sentence structure as tip for finding answer, length of answers as clue for POE, POE in general); vocabulary/word attack strategies, e.g., context clues; true/false; when to guess on any question type; use of never, none, always; how to approach all of the above, none of the above and "a and c only" type answer options;
EXCEPT question type)



For topic on reading comprehension strategies for test taking/timed tests, you must include tips for attacking main idea/topic sentence; detail; inference questions; in particular,
e.g., read questions first, then read para, but only 1st and last para, then 1st and last sentence of each para, scan for key words from question; POE, e.g. how to eliminate answer choices to arrive at correct answer and what types of answers to keep;



For topic on vocabulary, you should include the following: straightforward definition, word in context; 3 types of words, e.g., words you know, words you "sort of" know, and words you've never seen before; (recommendation only - ways to expand your vocabulary, including flash cards, "image" approach, mnemonics; read a newspaper, news magazine on a regular basis and create your own mini-dictionary; use new words in your daily speech; recommend Hit
Parade of words as a resource to create flashcards, e.g., 250 words (and their definitions) most likely to appear on standardized tests; also Hit Parade of prefixes and roots (same idea as with 250-word Hit Parade.)



For topic on how to take an essay exam, you should use chart in textbook.



For topic on test format and timing/pacing (general test-taking strategies), you must include two-pass system (e.g., easy, middle, hard questions in that order); when to guess/what is most likely answer; "letter of the day" at end of timed test.



For topic on computer-based testing tips/techniques Computer Adaptive Tests (CAT), cadets must include the following information from SET's test taking strategies for CAT exams (4 tips.) Most of the same general test-taking strategies would apply to the CAT. The primary difference seems to be in format, the test taker's inability to skip and go back to previous questions, and weighting of questions. Other issues center on test taker's ability/comfort level in use of computer and familiarity with user interface. SET also contains several pages that show how to navigate in a CAT test format.



For topic on typical “question words” frequently found on tests, you must include the following terms: compare, contrast, criticize, define, describe, diagram, discuss, enumerate, explain, evaluate, illustrate, interpret, justify, list, outline, prove, relate, review, state, summarize, and trace.

225

Exercise 5: Scenario Activity
Directions: On four index cards, write both partners’ names at the bottom of the unlined side of each of the cards. Create a scenario for each game card. The scenario must be about a specific subject area and situation that calls for a learner to use effective and efficient study tips and techniques. Example scenario: Jack daydreams in English class. He does not pay attention. He says he has to read it all at home again anyway, so why bother. When he calls you every night to ask for the homework assignment, he complains he is always behind and can he borrow your class notes. Tell him you are going to make him a poster he can read each morning before he leaves for school. It will tell him what to do in class and please stop calling you every night. What will you put on that poster for Jack? (Answer: Use recommendations from Making the Most of Class
Time.)



Write each scenario on the lined side of the index card and the response/correct answer in pencil on the unlined side of the index card.



226

Write each scenario so that the contestant’s response to that scenario is the appropriate study tip or technique for that situation.

Paper clip the game cards together; instructor collects all cards.

Exercise 6: Test Taking Strategies
Directions:
Work together as a team to provide 2 answers to each question in the table below. st 1. Read each question and the answer choices carefully (in the1 column of table below)
2. Indicate the test taking strategy/tip your team used to answer the question and how you arrived at the nd correct answer (in the 2 column of the table). rd 3. Indicate the correct answer to the question (in the 3 column of the table).
Test Question

Test Taking
Strategy/Tip

Ans

1. Franklin is widely regarded as the first person to realize that lightning was made of electrically charged air. As a way of testing his theory, he attempted to discover whether lighting would pass through a metal object. To show this, he used a kite to raise a key into the air on a stormy night. From this experiment, Franklin realized that this electricity could be guided to the ground by a metal wire or rod, thereby protecting houses, people and ships from being hurt.
One of Franklin’s discoveries was
A. how to protect houses from lightning
B. the battery
C. the electric generator
D. a hydroelectric dam
2. The electric eel is one of the most curious animals on the planet. As the name implies, the electric eel has the ability to generate a strong electric field. When it comes time to feed, the eel relies on its electrical system for hunting. Because small animals have a different electrical “signature” than do plants or rocks, the electric eel effectively has a kind of radar that allows it to find fish. When the eel finds its prey, it delivers a strong electric current, which can instantly kill smaller animals such as fish.
The force of the charge is often strong enough to kill or stun even larger animals. How does the eel avoid hurting itself? The eel has evolved a kind of insulation that protects its nervous system. This insulation acts as a buffer against the electricity that it generates. It can be inferred from above, that the electricity is dangerous because it
A. damages the nervous system
B. interferes with breathing
C. deprives animals of food
D. causes animals to bleed
3. Mary Shelley was born in 1797. Her parents, Mary Wollstonecraft and William
Godwin, were both writers. She was surrounded as a child by some of the greatest literary figures of her day, including Samuel Coleridge and Charles Lamb. Her parents introduced her to these people, because they believed that every child had the potential to develop a great intellect. Shelley wrote her best-known work,
Frankenstein, at the age of 19. She wrote it while staying at Lake Geneva along with a group of young poets which included Lord Byron and Percy Shelley, whom she would later marry.
In approximately what year did Shelley write Frankenstein?
A. 1805
B. 1811
C. 1816
D. 1820

227

Test Question
4. The Tower of London is London’s most popular tourist attraction. A great deal of fascinating history has taken place within its walls. The tower has served as a fortress, a royal residence, a prison, the royal mint, public records office, observatory, military barracks, place of execution, and city zoo. Today, it houses the crown jewels and a great deal of English history.
The Tower of London was used for all of the following EXCEPT:
A. a place where money was minted
B. a royal residence
C. a place of religious pilgrimage
D. a place where executions were held
5. Krakatau, earlier misnamed Krakatoa, an island located in the Sundra Strait between Sumatra and Java, disappeared on August 27, 1883. It was destroyed by a series of powerful volcanic eruptions. The most violent blew upward with an estimated force of 100-150 megatons of TNT. The sound of the explosion traveled around the world, reaching the opposite end of the earth near Bogota, Colombia, whereupon it bounced back to Krakatau and then back and forth for seven recorded passes over the earth’s surface. The audible sounds, resembling the distant cannonade of a ship in distress, carried southward across Australia to Perth, northward to Singapore, and westward 4600 kilometers to Rodriques Island in the Indian Ocean. This was the longest recorded distance traveled by any airborne sound in history.
The author mentions “the distant cannonade of a ship in distress” in order to
A. describe a ship damaged by a volcanic eruption
B. show that sound travels very quickly over water
C. help illustrate the sound made by the Krakatau eruption
D. illustrate the distance traveled by the volcano’s heat wave
6. He was very upset over the unexpected death of his benefactor.
A. dictator
B. supervisor
C. sponsor
D. partner
7. Debilitate most nearly means
A. weaken
B. reinforce
C. employ
D. destroy
8. Vociferous most nearly means
A. to appease
B. flavorless
C. loud and insistent
D. overly scholarly
9. His precarious behavior could get him into trouble.
A. sophisticated
B. illegal
C. secretive
D. risky

228

Test Taking
Strategy/Tip

Ans

Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Study Habits that Work for You -Techniques Assessment
Task [U3C3L3]

Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:
Develop personal study and test-taking strategies
Linked Core Abilities

Build your capacity for life-long learning
Apply critical thinking techniques

Directions
For this Performance Assessment Task you apply at least two study skills and one test-taking strategy to one high school subject area over a two-week period of time.
Keep a journal to chart each day's activity. Your journal should include the following information:
1. Date began
2. Course Name
3. Grade in course on the date began
4. Study Skill weakness area
5. Study Skills planning to use
6. Day to day update on skill(s) used and why
7. Test-taking strategy implemented and why
8. Test grade
9. Written summary of results
Self assess your work using the scoring guide provided.
Submit your completed assessment task to your instruction for evaluation and a grade.

229

Study Habits and Test Taking Scoring Guide
Criteria

Ratings

1. You apply one or more study skill strategies to various courses within your high school course of study over a two-week timespan

met

not met

2. You apply one or more test-taking strategies over a two-week timespan met

not met

3. You record the date your project began

met

not met

4. You record the course name

met

not met

5. You record the beginning grade in course on the date began

met

not met

6. You record a personal study skill weakness

met

not met

7. You record the results of your applications

met

not met

8. You explain why the application worked or didn't work

met

not met

9. Written product fulfills a clear purpose

met

not met

10. Written product shows evidence of logical critical thinking

met

not met

11. Written product follows prescribed format, meeting criteria for all components

met

not met

12. Written product exhibits correct and appropriate grammar, punctuation, spelling, syntax, and word usage

met

not met

13. You assume personal responsibility for learning

met

not met

14. You initiate formal and informal learning processes to acquire new abilities and insights

met

not met

met

not met

FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
BUILD YOUR CAPACITY FOR LIFE LONG LEARNING

APPLY CRITICAL THINKING TECHNIQUES
15. You evaluate sources of information

Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

230

Student Learning Plan
Unit 3: Foundations for Success

The Communication Process [U3C4L1]

Every day, one of your main activities is communicating with others. You communicate at home, at school, with your friends, and in the community. For some of you, you are also communicating in a job environment. For adults, communication at work can be the difference between success and failure. In this learning plan, you will identify your communication style and practice ways to clearly communicate with others.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Demonstrate how the communication process affects interaction between individuals
Linked Core Abilities
Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques
Treat self and others with respect

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your knowledge and skill:
G

by demonstrating the communication process in a team role play situation

Your performance will be successful when:
G

role-play includes examples of the consequences of poor verbal and nonverbal communications

G

role-play includes at least two tips for avoiding mixed messages when communicating

G

role-play includes examples of clear verbal and nonverbal communications

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Describe the communication model for interpersonal interactions
b. Compare verbal and nonverbal means of communication
c. Explain how to avoid mixed messages
d. Evaluate your communication style
e. Define key words: audience analysis, channel, feedback, mixed messages, noise, nonverbal, receiver, setting, verbal

231

2

The Communication Process [U3C4L1]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

CREATE a newscast headline and a 30-second sound byte for a Lesson 1 key word assigned by your instructor. INCLUDE the word definition and an explanation of how the word relates to the communication process. PRESENT your headline and sound byte to the class. [Work independently or with assigned partner]

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 1 independently.

_____3.

VIEW a presentation or CONDUCT RESEARCH on the communication process. PARTICIPATE in a small group activity to CREATE two Flow Maps to: 1) describe the communication process and 2) put in order the steps for effective communications. DISPLAY both of your maps in the classroom and PLACE copies in your notebook. [Work with assigned team members] VIEW the Communication Do's & Don'ts video clip. TAKE NOTES to identify the main points of the video. PARTICIPATE in a Think-Share-Pair activity to discuss examples of when you have witnessed Do's & Don'ts as shown in the video. [Work with the class]

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 3 independently. DESCRIBE examples of when you have witnessed Do’s & Don’ts as shown in the video. RECORD responses in your Cadet Notebook.

_____5.

REVIEW traits of your dominant Winning Colors® by VIEWING the Winning Colors® Video or REVIEWING notes from Chapter 1, Lesson 1. CREATE a tree map to categorize how your dominant Winning
Colors® communication style most effectively communicates with all Winning Colors® styles. PRESENT your map to the class. [Work with teammates of the same WC style]

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 5 independently. RECORD responses in your
Cadet Notebook.

_____7.

CREATE a role-play skit to show appropriate and inappropriate ways to communicate verbally and nonverbally. READ the Communications Process Assessment Task sheet for directions and criteria./
SELF-ASSESS your work using the Scoring Guide. PREPARE to present the role-play to the class.
[Work with an assigned team]

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] THINK ABOUT a communication problem you have experienced. DESCRIBE a situation when you received or gave a mixed message that resulted in confusion or an unexpected response.
DESCRIBE how the mixed message could have been avoided. ENTER your answers in your Cadet Notebook.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2

232

COMPLETE the Communication Process Assessment Task. SELF-ASSESS your work using the Communication Process Scoring Guide. SUBMIT your Scoring Guide to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above; omit Step 5 in the directions.

Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Communication Process Assessment Task [U3C4L1]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:
Demonstrate how the communication process affects interaction between individuals
Linked Core Abilities

Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques
Treat self and others with respect

Directions
As you work through the lessons in Chapter 4: Communication Skills, you will compile a portfolio of documents related to your communication skills. For this lesson, complete the Communication Process
Role Play Assessment Task. For this task your team will have 15 minutes to create a 4-minute role-play skit that demonstrates the communication process.
1. Preview the criteria listed in the Communication Process Role Play Scoring Guide to plan your writing. 2. Write a role-play with a theme of your choice that features the communication process. Write your role-play in script form. Every team member must have a part. When your role-play is acted out, it should be about four minutes in length. Use your notes and information for Chapter 3 - Lesson 1 to prepare for the skit.
3. Self-assess your work using the Communication Process Role Play Scoring Guide.
4. Submit your script and Scoring Guide to your Instructor for feedback and evaluation.
5. Perform your "polished" role-play for the class.

233

Communication Process Role Play Scoring Guide
Criteria

Ratings

1. Role-play includes an example of the consequences of poor verbal communications met

not met

2. Role-play includes at least two tips for avoiding mixed messages when communicating met

not met

3. Role-play includes an example of the consequences of poor nonverbal communications met

not met

4. Role-play includes an example of clear verbal communications

met

not met

5. Role-play includes an example of clear nonverbal communications

met

not met

6. Role-play situation is interesting and helps present the topic

met

not met

FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
COMMUNICATE USING VERBAL, NON-VERBAL, VISUAL, AND WRITTEN TECHNIQUES
7. You select appropriate means to convey a message

met

not met

8. You interpret nonverbal communications

met

not met

Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

234

Assessment 1: Role Play
Directions: Evaluate the skits based upon the criteria presented in the rubric below.

Great job!
(5-4 points)

Criteria of Completion

Met criteria.
(3-2 points)

Needs work.
(1-0 point)

1. Skit completed within 3-4 minutes.
2. Clear verbal message.
3. Clear nonverbal message.
4. Obvious conflict between verbal and nonverbal message.
5. Showed consequence of mixed messages.
6. Included a tip for avoiding mixed messages in the future.
Total Points Awarded

235

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236

Student Learning Plan
Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Becoming a Better Listener [U3C4L2]

Listening is the neglected communication skill. We spend nearly half of our communication time listening, but few of us make any real effort to be better listeners. It is as important for you to understand the person as it is to understand what the person is saying. In this learning plan, you will practice strategies to improve your active listening skills.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Use active listening strategies
Linked Core Abilities
Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques
Treat self and others with respect

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your knowledge and skill:
G

by demonstrating active listening skills and placing an Active Listening Task Summary in your Cadet Portfolio

Your performance will be successful when:
G

you demonstrate attentive listening skills

G

you document how you demonstrate active listening strategies

G

you accurately summarize information you have heard during a presentation

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Explain how barriers prevent effective listening
b. Compile a list of trigger words
c. Identify four tips to improve effective listening skills
d. Define key words: hearing, listening, thought speed, trigger words

237

2

Becoming a Better Listener [U3C4L2]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson.
Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

LISTEN to your instructor read a news story. WRITE answers to questions about the news story. SELFASSESS how many questions you answered correctly. [Work independently]

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] LISTEN to a news channel or radio station for a few minutes. WRITE DOWN what details you remember such as: who you heard speaking or singing; what commercials you saw/heard (if any); what topic(s) where covered, etc. RECORD listening notes in your Cadet Notebook.

_____3.

VIEW a presentation and/or CONDUCT RESEARCH listening barriers. BRAINSTORM reasons for poor listening using a Circle Map. [Work independently] GENERATE a list of barriers into one Circle Map
Map per team. DISPLAY your team’s Circle Map. [Work with a team of 2-5 cadets] CLASSIFY listening barriers into subgroups using a Tree Map. [Work with class members] COPY the map into your Cadet
Notebook. ANSWER the review questions at the end of the section. [Work independently]

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Activity 3 independently. RECORD responses to review questions in your Cadet Notebook.

_____5.

GENERATE tips to overcome listening barriers using information presented in the text and other reliable references uncovered in the Gather phase. PREPARE a three-minute briefing that targets assigned listening barriers and includes at least four different effective listening tips. [Work in teams of 2-5 cadets] _____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 5 independently. PRESENT the briefing to the instructor or a group of cadets or tape record the presentation.

_____7.

PRESENT a three-minute briefing generated in the previous activity to share tips for effective listening tips. [Work with a team of 2-5 cadets] DEMONSTRATE active listening strategies, and TAKE NOTES while listening to team briefings. [Work independently]

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] INTERVIEW a staff member or another working adult to learn how communication skills are used for that person’s job. Before the interview PREPARE a list of interview questions.
After the interview SEND the interviewee a thank you note.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

238

COMPLETE the Becoming a Better Listener Assessment Task 1. SELF-ASSESS your work using the Active
Listening Skill Scoring Guide 1. SUBMIT your Active Listening Skill Summary to your instructor for feedback and a grade. PLACE your Active Listening Skills Summary in your Cadet Portfolio.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] COMPLETE the Becoming a Better Listener Skill Assessment Task 2. SELF-ASSESS your work using the Active Listening Skill Scoring Guide 2. SUBMIT your Active Listening Skill Summary to your instructor for feedback and a grade. PLACE your Active Listening Skills Summary in your Cadet
Portfolio.

Exercise 1: Listen and Draw
Directions to Instructor:
1. Make enough copies of the images below to supply half of your cadets with image A, and the other half with image B.
2. Cut out images A and B, and separate them (by letter) into two equal piles.
3. Direct cadets to choose a partner.
4. Provide one partner with image A and one partner with image B.
5. Tell cadets not to show their partners the image they hold.
6. Explain the directions of the activity to the cadets:
• One cadet in each pair should volunteer to draw first.
• The other cadet in the pair should describe the image in their hands to the cadet without showing the image.
• In addition, the cadet who is drawing may not ask questions or ask for clarification.
• Give clear and concise directions about how to draw the image you see.
• After you have completed giving your directions, let the “drawer” see the image you were describing.
• When you have finished, alternate roles. The person who drew the first image now should describe their image to their partner.
• This time the partner may ask for clarification or additional directions.
• You still cannot show the image to the cadet who is trying to draw it from the description.
• After you have finished your directions, show the image you were describing to the “drawer”.

Image A

Image B

239

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240

Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Becoming a Better Listener Assessment Task 1 [U3C4L2]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:

Use active listening strategies
Linked Core Abilities

Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques
Treat self and others with respect

Directions
As you work through the lessons in Chapter 4: Communication Skills, you will compile a portfolio of documents related to your communication skills. For this lesson, complete Active Listening Skills
Assessment Task 1. In this assessment you will demonstrate active listening strategies and take notes during a briefing session. While you listen to the briefings, your instructor will observe and assess your behavior. 1. Preview the criteria listed in the Active Listening Skills Scoring Guide 1 to plan for your listening assessment. 2. Self-assess your work using the Active Listening Skills Scoring Guide 1.
3. Submit your completed Active Listening Summary to your instructor for feedback.
4. Revise the Active Listening Summary as needed and place the Summary in your Cadet Portfolio.

241

Becoming a Better Listener Scoring Guide 1
Criteria

Ratings

1. You demonstrated attentive listening skills

met

not met

2. You document at least four examples of how you demonstrated active listening strategies

met

not met

3. You accurately summarized information you have heard during the briefing session

met

not met

FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
COMMUNICATE USING VERBAL, NON-VERBAL, VISUAL, AND WRITTEN TECHNIQUES
4. You interpret nonverbal communications

met

not met

5. You ask questions for clarification

met

not met

6. You accurately apply standards of spelling, English grammar, and punctuation met

not met

Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

242

Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Becoming a Better Listener Assessment Task 2 [U3C4L2]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:

Use active listening strategies
Linked Core Abilities

Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques
Treat self and others with respect

Directions
As you work through the lessons in Chapter 4: Communication Skills, you will compile a portfolio of documents related to your communication skills. For this lesson, complete Active Listening Skills
Assessment Task 2. In this assessment you will describe how you used active listening strategies during an interview.
1. Preview the criteria listed in the Active Listening Skills Scoring Guide 2 to plan for your listening assessment. 2. Self-assess your work using the Active Listening Skills Scoring Guide 2.
3. Submit your completed Active Listening Summary to your instructor for feedback.
4. Revise the Active Listening Summary as needed and place the Summary in your Cadet Portfolio.

243

Active Listening Skills Scoring Guide 2
Criteria

Ratings

1. You list the questions asked and responses given during the interview. met

not met

2. You document at least four examples of how you demonstrated active listening strategies

met

not met

3. You document examples of how active listening skills were used by the interviewee during the interview

met

not met

FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
COMMUNICATE USING VERBAL, NON-VERBAL, VISUAL, AND WRITTEN TECHNIQUES
4. You interpret nonverbal communications

met

not met

5. You ask questions for clarification

met

not met

6. You accurately apply standards of spelling, English grammar, and punctuation met

not met

Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

244

Student Learning Plan
Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Causes of Conflict [U3C5L1]

What does conflict mean to you? Is it frightening or exciting? Is it interesting or unpleasant? Do you typically avoid it, or are you more likely to confront it? It is inevitable that you will encounter many different forms of conflict throughout your lifetime. Recognizing the causes and consequences of conflict can help you to make appropriate decisions and gain confidence in resolving conflicts.

Let 1

Why this is important:

In this Learning Plan you will learn how to:
Recognize potential conflict situations before they occur
Recognize the warning signs and the sequences of events that can fuel conflicts
Predict possible consequences and stay attuned to ways to stop the conflict from occurring (or escalating)

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Determine causes of conflict
Linked Core Abilities
Do your share as a good citizen in your school, community, country, and the world

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your knowledge and skill:
G

by creating a Conflict Multi-Flow Map illustrating the causes and effects of a specific conflict

Your performance will be successful when:
G

Multi-Flow Map states the conflict in the center box

G

Multi-Flow Map illustrates the causes of the conflict on the left side of the map

G

Multi-Flow Map illustrates the effects of the conflict on the right side of the map

G

summary identifies the type of conflict

G

summary references the four basic causes of conflict

G

summary describes the impact of the conflict on the relationship(s) involved

G

summary includes one or more “I” statements that could have been used to minimize conflict

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Recognize the impact of conflict on relationships
b. Describe the four basic causes of conflict
c. Analyze five different types of conflicts
d. Use “I” statements to facilitate effective communication
e. Define key words: active listening, conflict, effective speaking, frustration, harassment, hostility, miscommunication, relationships, solutions, territorial, understanding

245

2

Causes of Conflict [U3C5L1]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

PARTICIPATE in a discussion about conflicts that have affected a relationship. [Work with a small group] May create a T-Chart.

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] THINK ABOUT two or three conflicts that you have been involved in. BRIEFLY describe each conflict and who was affected by the conflict in your Cadet Notebook.

_____3.

VIEW a presentation or CONDUCT RESEARCH about the causes of conflict. LEARN MORE OR REVIEW by reading the Causes of Conflict section of your student text. CONSIDER one or more examples of conflict provided by your instructor. IDENTIFY the causes of the conflict in each example. [Work with a small group] ANSWER the review questions at the end of the section. May use a Multi-Flow Map.

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] READ the Causes of Conflict section of your student text. CONSIDER one or more examples of conflict provided by your instructor. IDENTIFY the causes of the conflict in each example. ANSWER the review questions at the end of the section. RECORD your responses in your
Cadet Notebook.

_____5.

IDENTIFY examples of each of the four basic causes of conflict and the five different types of conflict.
RECORD your examples in a Tree Map. [Work in teams of 3-6 cadets] CHOOSE one example and act it out for the class. DETERMINE the cause and type of conflict acted out by each group.

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] IDENTIFY examples of each of the four basic causes of conflict and the five different types of conflict. RECORD your examples in a Tree Map in your Cadet Notebook.

_____7.

VIEW a video on using “I” statements to facilitate communication and minimize conflict. PRACTICE using “I” statements in some of the conflict situations acted out in Learning Activity 5. [Work with a partner] _____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] REVIEW the information on “I” statements in your text OR view the video on using “I” statements. WRITE an “I” statement for each of the conflict examples recorded in your Cadet
Notebook in Learning Activity 6.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

246

COMPLETE the Causes of Conflict Assessment Task. SELF-ASSESS your work using the Scoring
Guide. SUBMIT your assessment task to your instructor for feedback and a grade. PLACE your completed Conflict Multi-Flow Map in your Cadet Portfolio.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Causes of Conflict Assessment Task [U3C5L1]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:
Determine causes of conflict
Linked Core Abilities

Do your share as a good citizen in your school, community, country, and the world

Directions
For this Assessment Task you will create a Multi-Flow Map illustrating the causes and effects of a particular conflict and write a brief summary.
1. Review examples of Multi-Flow Maps provided by your instructor.
2. Think of a specific conflict that you have been involved in and write it in the center of the Multi-Flow
Map. Examples could include:
• a disagreement among your friends about what to do on a Saturday night;
• an argument with your boss about scheduling;
• an argument with your siblings about taking your clothes or other possessions.
3. List the causes of the conflict on the left side of the Multi-Flow Map.
4. List the effects of the conflict on the right side of the Multi-Flow Map.
5. Write a short summary about your Conflict Multi-Flow Map including:
• the type of conflict (one of the five types studied in this lesson)
• a description of the impact of the conflict on the relationship(s) involved
• one or more "I" statements that could be used to minimize the conflict
6. Check your work using the criteria detailed in the Conflict Multi-Flow Map Scoring Guide.
7. Submit your Conflict Multi-Flow Map to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
8. Place your Conflict Multi-Flow Map in your Cadet Portfolio if desired.

247

Conflict Multi-Flow Map Scoring Guide
Criteria
Ratings
1. Multi-Flow Map states the conflict in the center met not met box 2. Multi-Flow Map illustrates the causes of the met not met conflict on the left side of the map
3. Multi-Flow Map illustrates the effects of the met not met conflict on the right side of the map
4. Summary identifies the type of conflict met not met
5. Summary references the four basic causes of met not met conflict 6. Summary describes the impact of the conflict on met not met the relationship(s) involved
7. Summary includes one or more "I" statements met not met that could have been used to minimize conflict
FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
DO YOUR SHARE AS A GOOD CITIZEN IN YOUR SCHOOL, COMMUNITY, COUNTRY, AND
THE WORLD
8. You recognize your responsibility to personal, met not met social, professional, and educational environments and makes informed decisions based on that responsibility 9. You work to resolve conflicts met not met

Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

248

Student Learning Plan
Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Conflict Resolution Techniques [Just Two Days]
[U3C5L2]

The success or failure of any conflict resolution depends on the attitudes and behaviors of the people involved in the conflict. Those skills, which promote positive, non-violent, conflict resolution, are:
Awareness of others

Let 1

Why this is important:

Awareness of the distinctions between self and others
Listening skills
Compromise
Ability to express one’s own thoughts and feelings
Ability to respond to the feelings of others
In this Learning Plan you will practice using these skills to resolve conflicts peacefully

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Apply conflict resolution techniques
Linked Core Abilities
Do your share as a good citizen in your school, community, country, and the world

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your knowledge and skill:
G

by applying the conflict resolution techniques to a conflict situation in your life

Your performance will be successful when:
G

you identify a conflict in your life that needs resolution

G

you draft ground rules for conflict resolution

G

you identify at least three possible options for solving the problem

G

you identify positive and negative consequences for each option

G

you determine if more information is needed

G

you determine a course of action to resolve the conflict

G

you determine the Winning Colors® needed to follow through effectively

G

you write a short summary about how applying these conflict resolution techniques might help you to resolve the conflict more effectively

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Apply awareness of differences in behavior preferences (Winning Colors®) to conflict situations and resolution
b. Evaluate the steps to managing conflict

249

2

Conflict Resolution Techniques [Just Two Days] [U3C5L2]

c. Assess personal conflict management skills
d. Recognize different hot buttons and the behavior style they indicate
e. Evaluate the pros and cons of alternatives to determine potential solutions to conflict
f. Define key words: apologize, compromise, mediation, negotiation, resolution

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

VIEW Video 1: Winning Colors®. DETERMINE your dominant colors. PARTNER with someone of a different dominant Winning Color® and identify ways that your colors tend to deal with conflict. CREATE a Tree Map comparing the ways that you and your partner tend to deal with conflict. [Work with a partner] _____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] COMPLETE Exercise #1: Determine Your Winning Colors. CREATE a Circle Map describing the ways that you tend to deal with conflict. CONSIDER how other Winning Colors might deal with conflict differently than you.

_____3.

VIEW a presentation or CONDUCT RESEARCH about conflict resolution. LEARN MORE OR REVIEW by reading the Conflict Resolution section of your student text. ANSWER the review questions at the end of the section. VIEW Video #2: Hot Buttons. COMPLETE Exercise #2: Hot Buttons [Work with a partner]

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 3 independently.

_____5.

WORK THROUGH one or more student scenarios from “Just 2 Days® “. DISCUSS the consequences of decisions made by each character. [Work in teams of 3-6 cadets]

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CREATE a T-Chart with different approaches to resolving conflicts peacefully.
Label the left side “Conflict” and the right side “Response”.

_____7.

WORK THROUGH one or more of the remaining student scenarios from “Just 2 Days®.” COMPLETE
Exercise #3: The Decision Making Process for the decisions made in each scenario. [Work in teams of 3-6 cadets] _____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] COMPLETE Exercise #3: The Decision Making Process for a hypothetical conflict situation.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

250

COMPLETE the Conflict Resolution Assessment Task. SELF-ASSESS your work using the Scoring Guide.
SUBMIT your work to your instructor for feedback and a grade. PLACE your completed Conflict Resolution
Assessment Task in your Cadet Portfolio.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Exercise 1: Determine Your Winning Colors®
®

Directions: In this exercise you will determine which of your Winning Colors are the strongest at the present time: planner, builder, relater, or adventurer. The four parts of self and your power to communicate reside in your ability to exhibit different behaviors in situations. Although everyone is comprised of each of the behaviors in diverse extents, the
®
goal of Winning Colors is to work to develop a balance between the four colors.
1. Start by numbering the following words or phrases in each item (A, B, C, D) from 1 to 4, moving horizontally across each row in order of importance to you. Number 1 would be the word or phrase that best describes your feelings of comfort and what you like inside – NOT how you would like to be – NOT how you act because of outside forces.
2. Total the vertical columns.
3. Circle the lowest score. Put a box around your second lowest score. Note: The lowest score identifies your present communication POWER or Winning Color. Your boxed score is your backup communication Power.
4. Read the next page of this exercise and then fill in the TREND blanks with the four parts of self that match the words in the column.
5. Next fill in the COLOR blanks with the color that matches the TREND based on the next page.

< 1=Most Important > < 2=Very Important > < 3=Somewhat Important > < 4=Least Important >

A

B

C

D

Being prepared

Let’s all be friends

Developing better and more logical ways

Living today and not worrying about tomorrow

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Telling people what they should do

Talking and socializing

Understanding and analyzing about tomorrow

Having fun and excitement with people

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Saving and budgeting

Giving

Creating

Spending

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Leading

Relating

Planning

Exploring

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Being Organized

Bring loved and accepted

Being correct and competent Being in spontaneous action

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

A Total: _____

B Total: _____

C Total: _____

D Total: _____

Trend: _______________

Trend: _______________

Trend: _______________

Trend: _______________

Color: _______________

Color: _______________

Color: _______________

Color: _______________

Rating: _____

Rating: _____

Exercise adapted from Conflict Resolution Through Winning Colors ® used with permission by authors Stefan Neilson and Shay Thoelke ©1999.

251

Note: Make sure the phrases are numbered and the columns are totaled before going any further.
Directions: In your table on the previous page, fill in the appropriate trend word and corresponding color found below.
A.
B.
C.
D.

Under column A the TREND is Builder and the COLOR is Brown, representing leadership and decisiveness.
Under column B the TREND is Relater and the COLOR is Blue, showing openness and feeling.
Under column C the TREND is Planner and the COLOR is Green, containing deep, hidden, changing currents.
Under column D the TREND is Adventurer and the COLOR is Red, producing excitement, action and fun.
®

According to the creators of Winning Colors , the colors symbolize the four elements of life: Earth, Air, Water, and Fire.

252

Exercise 2: Hot Buttons
Directions: Read the different communication techniques listed on the right hand side. Match them to the appropriate
®
Winning Color behavioral style.

Brown/Builder

Green/Planner

Blue/Relater

Red/Adventurer
























Keep to the here and now.
Provide responsible positions.
Take a serious approach.
Establish a stable structured learning situation.
Take a friendly approach to their communication.
Provide rules and directions.
Take a light-hearted, fun and active approach.
Show interest, being patient, calm and collected.
Give genuine concern, smile, and be kind.
Explain directions step-by-step.
Provide a social atmosphere and occasions to interact.
Supply details and allow more time for projects and decisions.
Be willing to change and be flexible.
Call on them in a crisis or performance situation.
Give occasions for emotional outlets.
Give status and control over others.
Try not to impose time constraints.
Respect their feelings or they will live in fear of you.
Take a bottom-line approach.
Create result-oriented action situations consistent with common goals.
Ask for opinions after giving them time to prepare response.
Allow time for discussion groups or teamwork.

Adapted from Leadership, Team Building, Self-esteem and Conflict Resolution Communication® and from Conflict Resolution Through Winning Colors ® used with permission by authors Stefan Neilson and Shay Thoelke ©1998 and ©1999.

253

Exercise 3: The Decision Making Process
Directions: Choose a conflict or challenge that needs resolution. It may be something in your life that needs attention, or a hypothetical situation you would like to address. Fill in the topic and details, different options or choices you can make, and the consequences involved in each. Weigh the pros and cons of each option in order to come to a viable solution to
®
the conflict and the decision that may resolve the conflict. Finally, determine which of your Winning Colors will help you address the decision.
Conflict:

Option 1

Option 2

Option 3

Positive Consequences +

Positive Consequences +

Positive Consequences +

Negative Consequences -

Negative Consequences -

Negative Consequences -

Do I need more information?

My Decision:

Colors I need to bring up:

Form adapted from Conflict Resolution Through Winning Colors ® used with permission by authors Stefan Neilson and Shay Thoelke ©1999.

254

Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Conflict Resolution Assessment Task [U3C5L2]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities
Apply conflict resolution techniques
Linked Core Abilities

Do your share as a good citizen in your school, community, country, and the world

Directions
For this Assessment Task you will apply conflict resolution techniques to a conflict in your life.
1. Identify a conflict in your life that needs to be resolved. If you cannot think of a real conflict, use a hypothetical situation.
2. Write a short summary about how using conflict resolution techniques might help you to resolve the conflict more effectively.
3. Check your work using the criteria detailed in the Conflict Resolution Scoring Guide.
4. Submit your completed Conflict Resolution Summary to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
5. Place your completed Conflict Resolution Summary in your Cadet Portfolio if desired.

255

Conflict Resolution Assessment Scoring Guide
Criteria
Ratings
1. You identify a conflict in your life that needs resolution met not met
2. You draft ground rules for conflict resolution met not met
3. You identify at least three possible options for solving the problem met not met
4. You identify positive and negative consequences for each option met not met
5. You determine if more information is needed met not met
6. You determine a course of action to resolve the conflict met not met
7. You determine the Winning Colors needed to follow through met not met effectively 8. You write a short summary about how applying these conflict met not met resolution techniques might help you to resolve the conflict more effectively FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
DO YOUR SHARE AS A GOOD CITIZEN IN YOUR SCHOOL, COMMUNITY, COUNTRY, AND
THE WORLD
9. You work to resolve conflicts met not met

Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

256

Student Learning Plan
Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Orientation to Service Learning [U3C8L1]

Why this is important:
John F. Kennedy reminded Americans to “Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.” Take a look around you. There are many problems and people in need. Service learning experiences can become the starting point for reaching out — doing something good for those around you and making the world a better place. In this learning plan you identify the components of service learning and begin planning how you can help make a difference in your community.

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Identify the components of service learning
Linked Core Abilities
Apply critical thinking techniques

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your knowledge and skill: by evaluating examples of service learning projects to determine if they meet the requirements for a
JROTC Service Learning project



by writing a brief proposal for a potential JROTC Service Learning project



by submitting your Learning Log with reflection responses about the features and benefits of service learning Your performance will be successful when:


you describe how the project benefits the community



you describe how the project enhances learning



you describe how the project relates to the JROTC program curriculum



you identify one or more JROTC competencies addressed by the service learning project



you describe the role of teamwork in accomplishing the project



you suggest ways that a project could be modified to ensure that it meets established guidelines for JROTC service learning projects



Let 3



your Learning Log reflect insights, thoughts and ideas concerning service learning

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Distinguish between service learning and community service
b. Explain how service learning projects relate to cadet learning in the classroom
c. Compare the types of service opportunities within your community
d. Identify the benefits of serving others within a community

257

2

Orientation to Service Learning [U3C8L1]

e. Associate the roles and responsibilities of service learning teams
f. Define key words: community service, debriefer, facilitator, learning log, orientation, recorder, reflection, reporter, service learning, timekeeper

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

BRAINSTORM a list of community service activities that you and others in your class have been involved in. How did these activities benefit the community? How did they benefit the cadet(s) involved? HIGHLIGHT any activities that relate in some way to what you have learned in JROTC. [Work with the class]
PARTICIPATE in a discussion on the difference between service activities and service learning. CREATE a
Tree Map to list the attributes of community service and service learning. CREATE a Double-Bubble Map to compare community service with service learning. [Work with a team] RECORD your notes and answers to the reflection questions in your Learning Log. [Work independently]

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 1 independently.

_____3.

VIEW a presentation or CONDUCT RESEARCH on Service Learning. PARTICIPATE in a discussion on the components of a service learning project. [Work with the class] ADD items to the Double-Bubble
Map comparing community service to service learning. COMPLETE Exercise #1: What is Service Learning? using one of the project ideas listed in Learning Activity 1. [Work in teams] SHARE your results with the rest of the class. RECORD your notes answers to review and reflection questions in your Learning
Log. [Work independently]

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 3 independently.

_____5.

COMPLETE Exercise #2: Service Learning Scenario. DETERMINE the following: What needs were met?
What Service Learning components were included? What essential factors of service learning were demonstrated? How does this project relate to the JROTC program curriculum? CREATE a Multi-Flow
Map illustrating the causes and effects of the service learning project described in the scenario. [Work with a team] ADD responses to the reflection questions to your Learning Log. [Work independently]

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 5 independently.

_____7.

PARTICIPATE in a discussion on the reasons why providing service to fulfill needs is both important and a civic duty. DETERMINE a local need that could become a class service learning project. OBTAIN the
Orientation to Service Learning Assessment Task from your instructor. EVALUATE potential Service
Learning projects and write a proposal for a JROTC Service Learning project. [Work in teams] RECORD your notes and answers to the reflection questions in your Learning Log. [Work independently]

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 7 independently.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

258

COMPLETE the Orientation to Service Learning Assessment Task. USE the Scoring Guide to self-assess your work prior to submitting to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Exercise 1: What is Service Learning?
Directions: Listed below are the components for a Service Learning project. Use this sheet to evaluate a potential project to determine if it could be designed to meet the required components of the Service Learning Project. One of the key features of Service Learning is that it directly relates to student learning in the classroom.
1. Briefly describe the potential Service Learning Project:

2. Evaluate the potential project using the components of a Service Learning Project.
Service Learning Credit items (Unit Report,
USACC Form 187-A-R,
p. 11)
#6,8
#6,8
#3

#6,10
#5,10

#4,5
#3,4

#2

#1,9

#6,7

#7,8

Components of a JROTC
Service Learning Project

Does this project include this component? How might this project be modified to include this component?

1. Project benefits the community 2. Project benefits the cadet
3. Project results in learning related to the JROTC curriculum 4. Project addresses one or more JROTC competencies
5. Project requires teamwork to plan and implement the project 6. Project plan includes an orientation 7. Project plan includes training as needed to accomplish the goals of the project
8. Project plan involves ongoing reflection. Cadets record notes and reflection responses in the Cadet
Learning Log
9. Project plan involves cadet self assessment before, during and after the project, including the Success Profiler Skill Map
10. Project plan involves teamwork assessment such as
You the People Citizenship assessments. 11. Project plan involves writing a Project Report either individually or as a Team, summarizing the results of the
Service Learning Project.

259

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260

261

Scenario 2 – Blanket Drive
Major Hill asked his cadets what service activities they could incorporate to help meet the chapter standards. Discouraged by the number of homeless veterans in their community and with winter approaching, cadets decided to sponsor a weeklong community coat and blanket drive. Cadets then broke into teams and choose their group roles. They researched the Internet to determine how to go about the project. Cadets marketed the need and project to community members, churches, and organizations to solicit donations through speeches, brochures, correspondence, phone calls, etc. Cadet teams contacted local businesses to help collect and distribute the goods. In evaluating the service, cadets decided the program was a success and shared entries from their learning logs. They also identified what they learned and what improvements could be made in the future. Lastly, they briefed and thanked the community for the aid that was given.
What needs were met?

What service learning components were included?

What essential factors of service learning were demonstrated?

Scenario 1 – Recycling Program

Living in a city with a largely expanding population, community members were witnessing the increase of waste, and its effects on the environment (pollution, landfills, toxic hazards, etc.). First Sergeant
Petty asked her cadets what service activities they could provide to combat the problems they were encountering. After researching the situation, cadets decided to establish a recycling program for the school. They organized teams and assigned responsibilities to each cadet. Cadets researched and contacted local businesses for receptacles and hauling and distribution support. One team developed an ad campaign to encourage school-wide participation. Students outside of JROTC became motivated and formed a school club to continue the recycling efforts. Cadets continually shared entries from their learning logs and reflected on the benefits they were providing in relation to their classroom studies.

What needs were met?

What service learning components were included?

What essential factors of service learning were demonstrated?

Exercise 2: Service Learning Scenario

262
How does this project relate to JROTC curriculum?

Which competencies does this project address?

How does this project relate to JROTC curriculum?

Which competencies does this project address?

Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Orientation to Service Learning Assessment Task [U3C8L1]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities
Identify the components of service learning

Linked Core Abilities
Apply critical thinking techniques

Directions
For this assessment task you will evaluate one or more ideas for a Service Learning Project to determine if they meet the requirements for a JROTC Service Learning project. You will select a project and write a short proposal for a Service Learning Project.
1. Select a potential Service Learning Project from the ideas that you have explored throughout this learning plan.
2. Review the required components for JROTC Service Learning projects listed in Exercise 1: What is
Service Learning? and examine the JROTC Competency List to determine which competencies are addressed by the project.
3. Use the Exercise 1: What is Service Learning? worksheet to evaluate whether or not your project idea includes the required components and recommend ways that the project could be modified to include the required components.
4. Write a proposal for the project, indicating why you think it meets the requirements of a JROTC
Service Learning project. Be sure to address all of the areas identified in the Scoring Guide.
5. Record what you have learned about Service Learning in your Learning Log.
6. Submit your proposal to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
7. Place your completed proposal in your Cadet Portfolio if desired.

263

Orientation to Service Learning Scoring Guide
Criteria
1. You describe how the project benefits the community
2. You describe how the project enhances learning
3. You describe how the project relates to the JROTC program curriculum 4. You identify one or more JROTC competencies addressed by the service learning project
5. You describe the role of teamwork in accomplishing the project 6. You suggest ways that a project could be modified to ensure that it meets established guidelines for JROTC service learning projects 7. Your Learning Log reflect insights, thoughts and ideas concerning service learning
8. Written Proposal exhibits correct and appropriate grammar, punctuation, spelling, syntax, and word usage
9. Written Proposal shows evidence of logical critical thinking
FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
APPLY CRITICAL THINKING TECHNIQUES
12. You makes decisions considering alternatives and consequences 13. You view issues from multiple perspectives (local and global)
Name _________________________________________

Ratings met not met met not met met not met met not met

met

not met

met

not met

met

not met

met

not met

met

not met

met

not met

met

not met

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

264

Student Learning Plan
Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Plan and Train for Your Exploratory Project [U3C8L2]

Why this is important:
There are several things to consider before undertaking service learning. Planning ahead will prepare you mentally and physically to undertake the challenge. Before you select your own service learning project, you will learn how to plan a service learning project by planning an exploratory service learning project. In this learning plan you will work with a team to plan an exploratory service learning project and demonstrate the steps to conducting a proper service learning experience.

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Prepare for a service learning project
Linked Core Abilities
Build your capacity for life-long learning
Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques
Do your share as a good citizen in your school, community, country, and the world

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your knowledge and skill: by completing a service learning project plan for a selected project



by reflecting on the learning experience adding thoughts, insights and processes into your Learning Logs

Your performance will be successful when:


you identify the steps needed to conduct a service learning experience



project plan includes the essential components of a service learning project



project plan defines the goals of the project



project plan references the JROTC outcomes addressed by the project



project plan details the who, what, when, where, why and how of the project



project plan includes a project activity schedule



Let 3



you document reflections about the learning experience in your Learning Log

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Identify the steps needed in conduct a service learning experience
b. Identify the essential components of a service learning project
c. Assess the role of teamwork in completing a service learning project
d. Develop a service learning project plan
e. Define key words: experiential learning, exploratory project, field education, problem-based learning, training 265

2

Plan and Train for Your Exploratory Project [U3C8L2]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

CREATE a Flow Map of the steps required for implementing a service learning project. SHARE your Flow Maps with the rest of the class. CREATE a Tree Map with a column for each step in the sequence. List any supporting information about that step, such as “why” it is important, what occurs during that particular step, etc. TEACH OTHERS in the class about one “step” of the service learning process. [Work with a team] REFLECT on the insights, processes, procedures and new ideas pertaining to Service Learning in your Learning Log.

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CREATE a Flow Map of the required steps for implementing a service learning project. WRITE a short explanation in your Learning Log about why each step is important.

_____3.

VIEW a presentation or CONDUCT RESEARCH on planning and training for your about exploratory project
CONTRIBUTE to a discussion on project ideas and how the relate to the JROTC program. [Work with a team]
SELECT or CONFIRM the subject for the exploratory project. DISCUSS expectations of team members’ roles and CHART what each member knows and what they want to know in a KWL Chart. [Work with a large group]
REFLECT on the project goals and CONSIDER the type of project agreed upon, what roles each team member will play, and why all members must participate. ADD thoughts, insights and new ideas to your Learning Log.
[Work independently]

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] PREVIEW the project ideas provided by your instructor. READ the Preparing for an Exploratory Project section of the student text. ANSWER the section review questions. CONSIDER the project selected (by you, instructor or members of your class) and CREATE a KWL Chart noting what specific steps you are already familiar with (in the “K” column) and what steps need clarification (“W”) column. SHARE the information that you want to know more about with your instructor. RECORD answers to the reflection questions in your Learning Log.

_____5.

EXAMINE Exercise #2: Service Learning Project Plan. CONSIDER how the project plan helps to determine the Who? What? When? Why? and How? of a service learning project. BRAINSTORM a list of the information that you will need to obtain to be able to complete a project plan for the exploratory project, such as contact information for the group, agency, or organization you will be working with; availability of facilities, etc. DRAFT a project description and project goals and record them in your Service
Learning Project Plan for the exploratory project. [Work with a team]

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 5 independently.

_____7.

OBTAIN the Plan and Train for Your Exploratory Project Assessment Task from your instructor. [Work with a team] COMPLETE a Service Learning Plan for your exploratory project. UPDATE your Learning Log about new processes, thoughts, reflections and ideas as related to service learning planning.

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT learning activity 7 independently.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

266

COMPLETE the Plan and Train for Your Exploratory Project Assessment Task. USE the Scoring guide to self-assess your work. SUBMIT your completed assessment to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Exercise 1: Steps to Conducting Service Learning
Directions: Cut out the steps below and arrange or paste in a bridging snapshot by showing the logical sequence of steps. The guide provided below the steps may be used to paste the steps in the correct order. This exercise will give you guidelines to follow and a proposed order to complete each step.

Step #__

Step #__

Step #__

Step #__

Participate in a meaningful service activity that meets the guidelines. Start Learning Log to record new knowledge, thoughts and feelings throughout all phases.

Discuss and reflect on what was experienced during the service
(observation).

Determine a school, community, or national need you can fill relating to class curriculum.

Step #__

Step #__

Step #__

Step #__

Discuss and reflect on what can be done with the new information gained (integration).

Pre-assessment of skill level using the personal skills map, short or long version. Brief the experience to community members, administration, classmates, etc.

Plan and organize details of the service activity and discuss expectations. Step #__

Step #__

Step #__

Step #__

Post-assessment using the personal skills map and related analysis to determine plan of action.

Complete a project summary report, a final group evaluation form to judge teamwork, etc.

Brainstorm and select a meaningful service project that meets proposed guidelines.

Discuss and reflect on what was gained from the experience
(analysis).

Step #1

Step #2

Step #3

Step #4

Step #5

Step #6

Step #7

Step #8

Step #9

Step #10

Step #11

Step #12

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268

269

a. How will you establish an effective project team? (i.e. select team members, provide
Teambuilding opportunities, use Winning Colors, etc.)

Core Abilities:
5. Teamwork: How will you use Teamwork to accomplish your project goals?

Competencies:

Program Outcomes:

McRel Standards:

#4, 5,6,7,10

#3,4, 5, 6, 10

4. Learning Goals:
a. How will this project enhance your learning, both academically and personally?

b. Which JROTC program outcomes does this project address? (For a list of JROTC Program
Outcomes, see the JROTC Leadership Education and Training Program of Instruction)

#4, 5, 6, 8

3. Service Goals: How will this project benefit the community?

Service Learning
Credit (Unit Report,
USACC Form 187AR,
p. 11)
#4, 5

#4, 5

Notes

2. Project Goals: What do you hope to accomplish?

1. Project Description:

Project Requirement:

Project Team Members: ______________________________________

Project Title: ___________________________________

Date:

Exercise 2: Service Learning Project Plan

270
#1

#10, 4

3. Project Team Training:
• Service-related training
• Teambuilding activities

#2,3, 6

4. Cadet Self-Assessment: (Success Profiler Skills Map)

5. Service Learning Project Activities: (Ensure that scheduled time meets JROTC project requirements)



#10, 4

2. Project Team Orientation:

1. Project Set Up:
• Contact community organization or agency
• Assemble supplies/equipment
• Gain permissions if required
• Other?

Service
Learning
Credit
#4, 5

Who’s involved? Date
Completed

#4, 5

8. Training and Orientation: What kinds of training and orientation will you need to prepare for the project?

Service Learning Project Schedule:
Activity

#2, 4, 6

7. Reflection: How will you accomplish ongoing reflection on your learning and experiences?

Date and time:

# 1, 6, 9

6. Self-Assessment: How will you accomplish self-assessment?

c. How will you evaluate your team’s effectiveness? (i.e. “You the People” group evaluation)

b. How will you facilitate team communication, cooperation, conflict resolution and decisionmaking? (i.e. use “You the People” group processes)

Notes

271

#2,4,6

#2, 3, 6

#2,3,4,6,
7,8,9,10

6. Learning Log Entries: (schedule frequency of entries depending on how project activities are scheduled)

7. Project Wrap Up: (correspondence with community organization/agency, return supplies and equipment, etc.)

8. Project Documentation:
• Project Report
• Project Final Reflection
• Project Presentation/Briefing
• Self-assessment
• Team Evaluation
• Other

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272

273

A yearlong study culminating in a
Wall of Fame celebration Supports the
BE,KNOW,DO
model

Develop public service messages
Contribute to civic programs

2. Project Goals: What do you hope to accomplish?
• Recognize those leaders who have made significant contributions to society • Communicate effective leadership skills and principles
• Become an active, participating citizen in the community

3. Service Goals: How will this project benefit the community?
• Raise civic awareness and pride in community
• Promote cultural tolerance for all groups
• Prepares youth for future career choices

Notes

1. Project Description:
Show how we as a community and nation can learn leadership principles and values from the examples set by famous people and leaders who have coped with challenges and overcome obstacles to become effective leaders.

Project Requirement:

Project Team Members: ___Cadets___________________________________

Overcoming Obstacles :Looking To Leadership

MM/DD/YYYY

Project Title:

Date:

Exercise 2: Service Learning Project Plan

#4, 5, 6, 8

#4, 5

Service Learning
Credit (Unit Report,
USACC Form
187AR, p. 11)
#4, 5

274

a. How will you establish an effective project team? (i.e. select team members, provide Teambuilding opportunities, use Winning Colors, etc.)
• Use cadet strengths and weaknesses identified from Winning Colors study and Personal Skills Map

Core Abilities:
• Communicate using verbal/nonverbal, visual written techniques
• Take responsibility for actions and choices
• Treat self and others with respect
• Apply critical thinking techniques
5. Teamwork: How will you use Teamwork to accomplish your project goals?

Competencies:
• Identify your leadership strenghs and opportunities for improvement
• Develop a personal code of ethics

Program Outcomes:
• Maximize potential for success through learning and self-management
• Develop leadership skills
• Builds effective relationships with peers, co-workers, and the community • Relate events in U.S.history to choices and responsibilities Americans have today

McRel Standards:
• Demonstrates leadership skills
• SR2-Perform self-appraisal
• SR1-Sets and manages goals

b. Which JROTC program outcomes does this project address? (For a list of JROTC
Program Outcomes, see the JROTC Leadership Education and Training Program of
Instruction)

4. Learning Goals:
a. How will this project enhance your learning, both academically and personally?
• Learn how attitudes affect a person’s actions
• Learn how life experiences aft a person’s values
• Lean how similarities and differences in values impact interactions with others • Develops citizenship and leadership skills
• Furthers our understanding of the importance of contributions great leaders have made to our country

Need to find out interests, needs and abilities of cadets Provide choice in grouping

Integrates with
We the People and You the
People
programs

Allows for the study of famous
Americans-past
and present

Uses Winning
Colors approach

Directly supports self-assessment from Success
Profiler

#4, 5,6,7,10

#3,4, 5, 6, 10

275

8. Training and Orientation: What kinds of training and orientation will you need to prepare for the project?
• Associate roles and responsibilities of service learning teams
• Explain and identify how service learning projects relate to cadet learning in classroom
• Develop communication skills ie. how to speak in public, interviewing techniques Need to place emphasis on communication process and celebrating cultural and individual Demonstrate their learning and be able to clearly articulate what they have done and why
#4, 5

#2, 4, 6

7. Reflection: How will you accomplish ongoing reflection on your learning and experiences? • Self-reflection
• Review of personal goals
• Cadet portfolio
• Entries in cadet notebooks
• Maintaining Wall of Fame

How will you evaluate your team’s effectiveness? (i.e. “You the People” group evaluation) • You the People Group evaluation
• Service Learning rubric
• Group debriefings and reflection

6. Self-Assessment: How will you accomplish self-assessment?
• Service learning checklist
• Success Profiler
• Use of graphic organizers and Thinking Maps to organize work
• Preparation of briefing

c.

Cadets make decisions about what goes in cadet portfolio.

# 1, 6, 9

Organize using strategy from You the People-group meetings

b. How will you facilitate team communication, cooperation, conflict resolution and decision-making? (i.e. use “You the People” group processes)
• Use skills developed from Chief Justice and You the People-consensus, debate • Use strategies learned from conflict resolution lessons, mediation lessons and
Success Profiler skill enhancement techniques



276
#1
#2,3, 6

#2,4,6

#2, 3, 6

5. Service Learning Project Activities: (Ensure that scheduled time meets JROTC project requirements)

6. Learning Log Entries: (schedule frequency of entries depending on how project activities are scheduled) 7. Project Wrap Up: (correspondence with community organization/agency, return supplies and equipment, etc.)

All team members, group leaders, instructor,

3 per week

Mike,
Husam,
John,
Jennifer

MM/DD/YYYY
H:MM

MM/DD/YYYY
H:MM

MM/DD/YYYY
H:MM
MM/DD/YYYY
H:MM

MM/DD/YYYY
H:MM

#10, 4

Mike

MM/DD/YYYY
H:MM

Date and time:

MM/DD/YYYY
H:MM

Brawnsons
Hardware,
Tim’s five and Dime,
Norah’s
Grocery

Who’s involved? differences

#10, 4

4. Cadet Self-Assessment: (Success Profiler Skills Map)

2. Project Team Orientation:
• Identify the benefits of serving others within a community
3. Project Team Training:
• Service-related training
• Teambuilding activities

1. Project Set Up:
• Contact community organization or agency
• Assemble supplies/equipment
• Gain permissions if required
• Other?

Service
Learning
Credit
#4, 5

Study techniques and strategies for team development, supervising, leading meetings, negotiating and decision making and problem solving Service Learning Project Schedule:
Activity



MM/DD/YYYY

MM/DD/YYYY

MM/DD/YYYY

MM/DD/YYYY

MM/DD/YYYY

MM/DD/YYYY

MM/DD/YYYY

Date
Completed

Notes

277

8. Project Documentation:
• Project Report
• Project Final Reflection
• Project Presentation/Briefing
• Self-assessment
• Team Evaluation
• Other
#2,3,4,6,
7,8,9,10

community contacts All team members, group leaders, instructor, community contacts
MM/DD/YYYY
H:MM

MM/DD/YYYY

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278

Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Plan and Train for your Exploratory Project Assessment Task
[U3C8L2]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:
Prepare for a service learning project

Linked Core Abilities
Build your capacity for life-long learning
Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques
Do your share as a good citizen in your school, community, country, and the world

Directions
For this assessment task you will complete a Service Learning Project Plan for the exploratory project selected by your instructor, your class, or your team. Use Exercise 2: Service Learning Project Plan to compile your project plan.
1. Review the steps for accomplishing a service learning project that you learned in this learning plan.
2. Review the components for JROTC Service Learning projects.
3. Obtain the JROTC outcomes from your instructor including the McRel Standards, JROTC Program
Outcomes, Core Abilities, and Competencies. Determine which of these outcomes are addressed by the exploratory project.
3. Complete Exercise 2: Service Learning Project Plan for your selected exploratory project.
4. Record what you have learned about Service Learning in your Learning Log.
5. Submit your project plan to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
6. Place your completed project plan in your Cadet Portfolio if desired.

279

Plan and Train for Your Exploratory Project Scoring Guide
Criteria
Ratings
1. You identify the steps needed to conduct a service learning met not met experience 2. Project Plan includes the essential components of a service met not met learning project
3. Project Plan defines the goals of the project met not met
4. Project Plan references the JROTC outcomes addressed by met not met the project
5. Project Plan details the who, what, when, where, why and met not met how of the project
6. Project Plan includes a project activity schedule met not met
7. You document reflections about the learning experience in met not met your Learning Log
FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
COMMUNICATE USING VERBAL, NON-VERBAL, VISUAL AND WRITTEN TECHNIQUES
8. You communicate accurately and clearly met not met
9. You speak and write clearly so others can understand met not met
DO YOUR SHARE AS A GOOD CITIZEN IN THE IN YOUR SCHOOL, COMMUNITY, COUNTRY
AND THE WORLD
10. You recognize your responsibility to personal, social, met not met professional, and educational environments and makes informed decisions based on that responsibility
11. You adapt to and work effectively with a variety of met not met situations, individuals or groups
Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

280

Student Learning Plan
Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Project Reflection and Integration [U3C8L3]

Why this is important:
Now that you have an idea of what service learning is all about, what comes next? After the exploratory project, you will be able to determine and conduct appropriate service learning activities. In this learning plan you will evaluate the effectiveness of the exploratory project completed in Lesson 2, as well as consider new ideas for integration throughout the JROTC curriculum.

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Evaluate the effectiveness of a service learning project
Linked Core Abilities
Apply critical thinking techniques
Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will demonstrate your knowledge and skill: by evaluating your service learning experience through structured reflection, demonstration, and evaluation



by reflecting on the learning experience adding thoughts, insights and processes into your Learning Logs



by writing a report or developing a presentation of your experience to share with others

Your performance will be successful when:


you participate in structured reflection activities about your service learning experience including completing your Learning Log, participating in class discussions, and writing reports and essays



you evaluate your service learning experience using the four quadrant model and justify your decision



you summarize the impact that the experience had on you in an essay or report



report/presentation addresses the results of the project, what you have learned, and how the experience has changed your life



Let 3



report/presentation includes new ideas for service learning projects based on what you have learned

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Relate the projected goals of a service learning project to the project results
b. Assess the role of structured reflection in extending learning
c. Evaluate a service learning experience using the four quadrant model
d. Define key words: advocacy service, after action review, analysis, direct service, indirect service, integration, observation, placement, project

281

2

Project Reflection and Integration [U3C8L3]

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.
_____1.

JOIN in a discussion with cadets who had “like” team roles for the exploratory projects. For example, one team will be Facilitators; one will be Recorders, etc. DISCUSS ways that your role made a difference in exploratory project. [Work with a team] PARTICIPATE in developing a Tree Map (or Double T-Chart) to describe the contributions of each team member’s role to the success of the service learning project.
[Work in a large group] ADD thoughts, insights, and responses to the reflection questions to your Learning
Log. [Work independently]

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] DESCRIBE your exploratory project experience in detail in your Learning Log.
RECORD your experiences, how you made a difference, how you felt, what you learned, and how it was an important service experience.

_____3.

PARTICIPATE in a discussion on Service Learning Quadrants and their function. VIEW Flash #1: Service
Learning Quadrants. DETERMINE which quadrant and level of integration the exploratory project belongs in. [Work with a large group] VIEW a presentation and CONDUCT RESEARCH on project reflection and integration. CREATE a graphic organizer to illustrate your assigned portion of research. PARTICIPATE with your team members in teaching others (Jigsaw) about your section of text. [Work with a team]
ADD thoughts, insights, new processes and responses to the reflection questions to your Learning Log.
[Work independently]

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] READ the Project Reflection and Integration section in your student text.
ANSWER the section review questions. REFLECT on which quadrant and level of integration the exploratory project belongs to and record thoughts on this in the Learning Log.

_____5.

COMPLETE Exercise #1: Service Learning Quadrants. [Work independently] JOIN a team to SHARE the results of Exercise #1. PARTICIPATE in a discussion on the scenarios presented in the exercise. [Work with a team of 3-6 cadets] ADD thoughts, insights, new processes and responses to the reflection questions to your Learning Log. [Work independently]

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] COMPLETE Exercise #1: Service Learning Quadrants using the answer key to check your work. ADD thoughts, insights, and new processes to your Learning Log.

_____7.

PARTICIPATE in a discussion on “After the Service” review. CREATE a Tree Map including examples of ways to accomplish structured reflection, demonstration, and evaluation of your service learning project. OBTAIN the Project Reflection and Integration Assessment Task along with any additional instructions and guidelines from your instructor. COMPILE the results of you project evaluation and structured reflection. WRITE your final entries in your Learning Log. BEGIN to work on your report/presentation. [Work independently]

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 7 independently.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

282

COMPLETE the Project Reflection and Integration Assessment Task. USE the Scoring Guide provided to self-assess your work. SUBMIT your completed assessment to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Exercise 1: Service Learning Quadrants
Directions: Review the quadrants below and evaluate the scenarios by filling in the blanks to determine what quadrants they belong in and why they belong there.

1

2

High Service
High Integration

High Service
Low Integration

High service meets a clear and important need; it is organized and implemented by cadets. High integration with the LET curriculum addresses classroom goals, incorporates classroom content, and improves courserelated knowledge and skills.

Scenario A: Cadets organize drive for stuffed animals and blankets after learning about work skills and participating in Groundhog Job Shadow Day. This example is ___ service, ___ integration, and belongs in quadrant #___.
Scenario B: Teacher directs cadets to send e-mail to deployed service members after studying a historic event through a cadet ride. This example is ___ service, ___ integration, and belongs in quadrant #___.

3

4

Low Service
High Integration

Low Service
Low Integration

Scenario C: Teacher assigns cadets to perform a color guard in the community after studying lessons in You the
People. This example is ___ service, ___ integration, and belongs in quadrant #___.
Scenario D: After studying lessons from NEFE HSFPP, cadets teach Junior Achievement lessons to elementary students and assist them in making posters to advocate financial responsibility. This example is ___ service, ___ integration, and belongs in quadrant #___.

283

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284

Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Project Reflection and Integration [U3C8L3]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:
Evaluate the effectiveness of a service learning project

Linked Core Abilities
Apply critical thinking techniques
Communicate using verbal, non-verbal, visual, and written techniques

Directions
For this assessment task you will document structured reflection and evaluation activities about your service learning experience. You will complete your Learning Log, participate in other forms of structured reflection such as class discussion

1. Participate in Structured Reflection Activities assigned by your instructor.
2. Use the Four Quadrant Model to evaluate your service learning experience and write a short justification for your decision.
3. Record your final thoughts and reflections on your service learning project in your Learning Log,
4. Write a report or prepare a presentation on your experience to share with others.
5. Use the scoring guide to self-assess your work.
6. Submit your Service Learning Project Evaluation, Learning Log, and Report or Presentation to your instructor for feedback and a grade. Work with your instructor to schedule a briefing to present your report/presentation to a group.
7. Place your completed documents in your Cadet Portfolio if desired.

285

Project Reflection and Evaluation Scoring Guide
Criteria
Ratings
1. You participate in structured reflection activities about your met not met service learning experience including completing your Learning
Log, participating in class discussions, and writing reports and essays 2. You evaluate your service learning experience using the four met not met quadrant model and justify your decision
3. You summarize the impact that the experience had on you in met not met an essay or report
4. Report/presentation addresses the results of the project, what met not met you have learned, and how the experience has changed your life
5. Report/presentation includes new ideas for service learning met not met projects based on what you have learned
6. Report/presentation meets guidelines and requirements met not met provided by instructor
7. Learning Log includes regular entries throughout the duration met not met of the project
8. Learning Log entries reflect observations and reactions to met not met experiences throughout the project
9. Learning Log entries document that learning objectives were met not met met 10. Learning Log entries are well organized met not met
FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
COMMUNICATE USING VERBAL, NON-VERBAL, VISUAL AND WRITTEN TECHNIQUES
11. You communicate accurately and clearly met not met
APPLY CRITICAL THINKING TECHNIQUES
12. You view issues from multiple perspectives (local and global) met not met
Name _________________________________________

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

286

Student Learning Plan
Unit 3: Foundations for Success

NEFE Introduction: Setting Financial Goals [U3C11L1]

Do you ever find that you don’t have enough money to buy something or participate in an activity? You may have already found that you need to make choices because your cash supply is limited. In this learning plan you will compare your wants and needs. You will also set personal financial goals as the first step in creating your own financial plan.

Let 1

Why this is important:

What you will learn to do:
(Competency)
Determine personal financial goals
Linked Core Abilities
Take responsibility for your actions and choices

How you will know when you are succeeding:
You will show that you have learned the target knowledge and skills:
G

by outlining personal financial goals and placing the goals in your Cadet Portfolio

Your performance will be successful when:
G

you identify at least two short-term, intermediate-term, and long-term current financial goals

G

your financial goals are written as SMART goals

G

your financial goals are realistic

Knowledge and skills you will learn along the way:
(Learning Objectives)
a. Differentiate between needs and wants
b. Describe how values can influence decisions
c. Compare SMART (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Reasonable & Time Bound))goals
d. Discuss how goals impact actions
e. Define key words: delayed gratification, goal, needs, SMART goals, values, wants

Learning Activities:
These learning activities are designed to help you learn the target skills and knowledge for this lesson.
Your instructor may assign additional or alternative learning activities.

287

2

NEFE Introduction: Setting Financial Goals [U3C11L1]

_____1.

LIST three personal goals you have set for yourself. [Work independently] PARTICIPATE in an activity to create a Know/Do/Learn chart about goal setting. [Work with the class] ADD responses to the reflection questions to your Cadet Notebook.

_____2.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 1 independently. ADD your goals, and
Know/Do/Learn chart to your Cadet Notebook.

_____3.

LEARN ABOUT the difference between wants and needs by reading selected pages of Unit 1: Financial
Planning—Your Road Map in your NEFE student guide. COMPLETE Assignment 1.1: My Needs and
Wants to classify spending activities as “needs” or “wants.” COMPLETE Assignment 1.2: My Values to identify your personal financial values. WRITE three goals based on your wants, needs, and values.
[Work independently] SHARE your responses with a partner and your instructor. [Work with a partner] ADD assignments to your Cadet Notebook.

_____4.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 3 independently.

_____5.

LISTEN to a briefing about SMART goals. PARTICIPATE in an activity to develop SMART goals. [Work with a team] COMPLETE Assignment 1.3: My SMART Goals to practice writing your own SMART financial goals. [Work independently] ADD your assignment and responses to the reflection questions to your Cadet Notebook.

_____6.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] LEARN ABOUT writing SMART goals by reading selected pages of Unit 1:
Financial Planning—Your Road Map in your NEFE student guide. CARRY OUT Learning Activity 5 independently. _____7.

LIST what you have learned on the KDL chart started in Learning Activity 1. [Work with the class]
OBTAIN the Financial Goals Assessment Task from your instructor. PREVIEW the Scoring Guide.
THINK ABOUT personal financial goals based on your current needs, wants, and values. WRITE
SMART financial goals that are short-term, intermediate-term, and long-term. [Work independently]

_____8.

[SELF-PACED OPTION] CARRY OUT Learning Activity 7 independently.

Assessment Activities:
These assessment activities will enable you to show that you have learned the target skills and knowledge for this lesson. Your instructor may assign additional or alternative assessment activities.
_____1.

_____2.

288

COMPLETE the Financial Goals Assessment Task. SELF-ASSESS your work using the Scoring Guide.
SUBMIT your work to your instructor for feedback and a grade.
[SELF-PACED OPTION] Same as above.

Unit 3: Foundations for Success

Financial Goals Assessment Task [U3C11L1]
Target Competency
This performance assessment task gives you an opportunity to document your achievement of the following skills, knowledge, and abilities:
Determine personal financial goals
Linked Core Abilities

Take responsibility for your actions and choices

Directions
As you work through the lessons in Chapter 11: NEFE Financial Planning Program, you will compile documents related to financial planning. For this lesson, complete the Financial Goals Assessment Task.
In this assessment you will describe at least six personal financial goals. Your goals should be realistic for your current situation.
1. Preview the criteria listed in the Scoring Guide to plan for your assessment.
2. Create a table similar to Assignment 1-1 in your NEFE student workbook. Use this table to describe specific financial goals that are realistic for your situation. List short-term, intermediate-term, and long-term financial goals as SMART goals.
3. Self-assess your work using the Scoring Guide.
4. Revise your financial goals and submit your goals to your instructor for feedback.
5. Revise your financial goals as needed and place your goals in your Cadet Portfolio in the Financial
Planning section. These goals will be used in future financial lessons.

289

Financial Goals Scoring Guide
Criteria
1. You identify at least two short-term financial goals
2. You identify at least two intermediate-term financial goals
3. You identify at least two long-term financial goals
4. Your goals are Specific
5. Your goals are Measurable
6. Your goals are Attainable
7. Your goals are Realistic for your current situation
8. Your goals are Time-bound
FOCUS CORE ABILITIES FOR ALL LEARNING PLAN ACTIVITIES:
TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR ACTIONS AND CHOICES
9. You assess the impact of your values on actions and decisions

Name _________________________________________

Ratings met not met met not met met not met met not met met not met met not met met not met met not met

met

Date ____________

Evaluator's Signature _________________________________ Date ____________
Comments:

290

not met

482530
082353-000

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...The United States Army Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps was started when the National Defense Act of 1916 was passed. The bill authorized high schools the use federal military equipment and an active duty military member as teachers. Later in 1964, all instructors were replaced with retired members of the military and opened JROTC to other branches of the military. The purpose of JROTC is to teach students the values of citizenship, service to the United States, and personal responsibility. JROTC teaches students leadership, citizenship, first aid, drug use prevention, physical fitness, communication skills. JROTC’s focus is on developing young people and orienting them positively in preparation for whatever role in life they might...

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Rotc

...was enrolled in the JROTC program. I didn’t last two week in the program before I had my mother come and withdraw me from the program and enroll me in P.E. At the time I didn’t know what ROTC and the benefits the program had to offer. As I have gotten older I have found out that there are many benefits for the students who are in the JROTC program. There is more than one branch of the JROTC. It has just as many branches as the United States Military. If I had had some prior knowledge on JROTC when I was in high school I may have giving it a chance. Junior ROTC is a part of a federal program that is sponsored by the United States Armed Forces. Junior ROTC is located within High Schools across America. Many students who enroll in the JROTC are more likely to enlist in part of the United States Military. The Reserve Officers Training Corps also known as ROTC began in 1916 on the campus of Yale University. Hundreds of thousands of cadets have trained there since then. Approximately 70,000 ROTC cadets train at over 300 campuses (Wissing 39). The latest branch was opened in 2011 when the secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus joined with Yale President Richard Levin to re-establish the ROTC on its campus. It had been 40 years since the last ROTC class graduated from Yale. Yale was the first to form the Navy Air Corps in 1917 and in 1926 was one of the first six to establish the NROTC (Wissing 39). The United States Army Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps (JROTC) came into......

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Multicutural Education

...education, and educational personnel must be prepared to deal with these values, in order to preclude the development of barriers between the students and the school. (Grant, 1992) Mission My study is about the language barrier in multicultural education in the Junior Reserve Officer Training Corp. The mission of JROTC is “to motivate young people to become better citizens”. Army JROTC is devoted to your growth as a student and as a person. This program gives an opportunity for total development and to improve you in many ways. JROTC teaches self-discipline, self-confidence, and pride in a job well done, and it offers you challenges and opportunities to: • Sharpen your communication skills. • Promote and encourage citizenship through participation in community service project. • Develop your leadership potential. • Strengthen your self-esteem. • Improve your physical fitness. • Provide incentives to live drug free. • Promote your graduation from high school and develop a solid foundation for cancer development. Purpose of Army JROTC JROTC prepares high school students for responsible leadership roles while making them aware of the benefits of citizenship. The results are responsible cadets who are sure of themselves, can think on...

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Rotc

...Jackson SHS Miami, FL HOW JROTC DIFFERS FROM OTHER HIGH SCHOOL COURSES The Code of Federal Regulations states that JROTC is "designed for physically fit citizens attending participating schools. In public schools, JROTC is usually an elective course with membership limited to US citizens and legal foreign nationals, those who will graduate with their 9th grade cohort, and have not experienced an out of school suspension during the preceding six-month period. Often, students who participate for one year receive credit in lieu of a physical education class. Students who excel in the first year of JROTC can apply for a second year. Most schools offer three to four years of JROTC training. Boarding schools or (pre-college) military schools may offer JROTC programs, with some requiring participation as a condition for acceptance to the school. Some public military schools mandate JROTC as a class for all grade levels, and have a curriculum that includes military history, military protocol, civics and physical fitness. Chicago has six public military academies, more than any other city and one-third of all in the country. A Marine Corps JROTC unit in Hendersonville, Tennessee. The JROTC program stresses military discipline, with a curriculum that emphasizes study of military science and military history. Cadets typically wear...

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Army Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps Analysis

...equipment to high schools across the United States. Thus, the Army Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps was born based upon the values of citizenship, service to our country, personal responsibility, and accomplishment. Army JROTC is what it is because of the events that shaped it, the cadets leading the program today, and what those same cadets wish for their own one hundred years from today. For nearly fifty years, the only branch of the military that supported a JROTC program was the Army branch- our branch. We were taught the Army values, the Cadet Creed with the words “Army Junior ROTC Cadet” inscribed in our brains. That is, until the JROTC...

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Cause and Effect

...The Military Changed My Life for the Better Life in the military has not only changed me, but it has molded me to become a better person. Before I joined the United States Navy, I was a member of Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) for my entire tenure of high school; as well as a scholarship recipient to the University of Kentucky. I had always been an intelligent, skillful and easy-going young lady; however JROTC thought me fundamentals of leadership, the importance of teamwork but most important it embedded confidence into myself worth. JROTC was just a minor stepping stone in my life; compared to how becoming a United States Sailor affected my life. One major change the military has had on me is my independence. My Father was a Solider in the Army and I was the youngest of four children. Even though we moved around every two to three years, to include starting new schools and making new friends; I always had my siblings no matter what state or house we lived in. There was never a sense of loneness or fear, I always had someone by my side in every endeavor. Initially, the military also provided me with that domestic feeling; until I was walked to medical, with no one by my side and I realized I was alone for the first time in my life. The preliminary shock of loneness brought tears to my eyes; but, I realized that just because I am away from my family and friends physically does not mean they are not in my heart. I realized that I was......

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My Time

...Officer Training Corps To give a little history on Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps (JROTC), it is a Federal program sponsored by the United States Armed Forces in high schools across the United States. The program was originally created as part of the National Defense Act of 1916 and later expanded under the 1964 ROTC Vitalization Act. I joined JROTC because I wanted to become a better person. One day while talking to my father I asked him how he became the discipline man that he is today. My father stated when he joined the Army, he had no other choice. He stated the Army conditions you to become well disciplined and a self starter. My mother always drilled in me to be respectful and value myself and others. My father was the first person to tell me about JROTC, he said I should look into it since I was a rising 9th grader and that’s exactly what I did. I researched JROTC and was amazed to see it would be able to give me everything I was looking for value wise. JROTC enables you to learn and appreciate the ethical values and principles that inspire good citizenship, to develop leadership potential, while getting my education. JROTC also encourages and helps you develop a logical way of thinking and to communicate effectively with others, both orally and in writing. It helps you to appreciate the importance of physical fitness in maintaining good health. JROTC helps you to understand the importance of high school graduation for a successful future,......

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Community Services

...becoming intelligent men. At least one Saturday out of the month, we had to volunteer by helping others to clean the streets of Memphis, TN. Doing this time, we picked up trash and clean up parks. The experience was alarming. This really made me want to change my ways by not throwing trash on the ground but into a trash bin. I did not enjoy the movement of cleaning after others. But I am more pleased to say I pick up behind myself and others. This experience has taught me to be responsible for my actions and to take encourage others to do the same. Next, another reason for community service is high school community work. As a current student at East High School, where I am enrolled in the JROTC program. I have been an active member for the past two years. Within the JROTC program it is required to do community service. One year we volunteered to help gather recruitments out of the 9th grade class. We...

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Letter to an Educator

...Letter to an Educator Dear Colonel Fields, The past four years of my life have been spent at this school and you’ve been a big part of it. The majority of my time devoted to this school has been JROTC, especially rifle team. I just wanted to write this to you to let you know what an influence you’ve made and the JROTC program has made on my life. I think that out of all the students in the program over the years that we were closest. Everything I know and excel in, I learned from you. You taught me how to shoot on the rifle team, which resulted in 1st place in the county last year. You demonstrated leadership and lead by example in order to make me a better leader, which resulted in becoming rifle team commander as well as Battalion Commander. Due to everything you ever taught me, I received the Army ROTC scholarship. This scholarship is going to change my life and make me a much greater success I think. You made it possible for me to make a career out of the military and go to college for Army ROTC with all the lessons you taught me and everything you ever did for me. You made me a better person and I thank you for everything. You are the reason I decided to go into Aviation, so that I could make a promising career in what I love and become at least half the man that you are today. Thank you for everything. Sincerely, Dylan...

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Milestone One

...and shooting of all types of guns. These rules fully apply to the air rifles that are used in JROTC marksmanship programs. These fundamental safety rules focus on three key parts of every gun that control when and where the gun can be fired. Those parts are the MUZZLE, ACTION, and TRIGGER. Everyone should know these basic parts of a gun, whether or not they ever will be involved in target shooting, so that they can practice the rules for safe gun handling any time they are in a situation where a gun is present. • MUZZLE. The forward end of the barrel. The point where the pellet or projectile leaves the barrel when the gun is fired. A gun is aimed by pointing its muzzle at the target. ACTION. The working mechanism of the gun. Gun actions typically have a bolt or lever that is used to open and close the action so that the gun can be loaded and unloaded. TRIGGER. The trigger is part of the action or working mechanism of the gun. The trigger is a lever that projects out of the bottom of the gun. A trigger guard protects the trigger. After a gun is loaded and the action is closed, the gun is fired by pulling the trigger. Trigger Action action muzzle safety trigger CBI INTRODUCTION The sport of target rifle shooting is one of the safest of all youth sports. In 104 years of Olympic shooting, there has never been an accidental injury involving a firearm. There are several thousand JROTC teams and junior rifle clubs that practice and compete in position...

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Recruiting

...AFQT (ASVAB) Scores pg 11 TSC-I 93-99 TSC-II 65-92 TSC-IIIA 50-64 TSC-IIIB 31-49 TSC-IVA 16-30 TSC-IVB 10-15 (not qual’d except 09L/09C) TSC-V 0-9 (not qual’d except 09L) Dependents (NPS) pg 19/20 Ok if: No spouse and no dependents No spouse and child support for 2 or less PV2, married, and 2 or less PFC, married, and 3 or less PFC, not married, and child support for 3 or less SPC, no dependent restrictions Enlisted (NPS) Promotions pg 15/16 E-2 1-2 yrs JROTC or NDCC 179 days or fewer at USMAPS 24-47 semester hrs (or equivalent) Completed Phase II of AFCAP and awarded the Billy Mitchell Award Awarded NSCADM by the NSCC Awarded Boy Scout Eagle or Sea Scout Quartermaster or Venturing Scout Silver Award Awarded Girl Scout Gold award Completed Army pre-basic training task list or ARNG Stripes for Skills One referral to the Army that enlists E-3 3+ yrs JROTC 1 yr of Senior ROTC 48+ semester hrs (or equivalent)-w/o bachelors Completed Associate’s degree 2+ yrs vo-tech school w/ certificate E-4 Completed Bachelor’s degree If qualified under the ACASP ***Can combine two E-2’s to equal an E-3 Forms DA 3286 Statements for Enlistment DA 5500 Body Fat Worksheet (Male) DA 5501 Body Fat Worksheet (Female) DA 705 APFT Card DD 1966 Record of Military Processing (Main) DD 214 Certificate of Discharge from AD DD 215 Corrections to DD 214 DD 220 Active Duty Report DD 2807-I Report of Medical History DD 2808 Report of Medical......

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