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Jurgis In Upton Sinclair's The Jungle

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It is rare that a man is ever all good or all bad. This thought plays a vital role in The Jungle by Upton Sinclair. Jurgis Rudkus, the main character of the novel, has this particular trait. He is not entirely bad or good and this is known as being ambiguous. The Jungle is largely based on Jurgis and his struggles through life and how he changed to fit the situations as they arrised. He is a kind loving man but as he learns the hardships of his new life he faces his fair share of demons and struggles to remain the caring man he came to America as.
Throughout the story, Jurgis is seen as hard-working, honest and proud man which are all desirable traits. In the beginning of the story Jurgis and his family come to America in hopes of getting rich. Jurgis is an honest working man willing to give everything he has to support his family. For
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In hard times Jurgis often fell to drinking. A major example of this would be after Ona and the baby die. Jurgis takes all the money that the family has and goes to the bar and states “I want to get drunk” (p. 190). The money that was hard earned by Kotrina that was to be used to feed the hungry children was selfishly taken by Jurgis to console his emotions. Another one of the downsides of Jurgis is his tendency to come to anger quickly. A conversation between Ona and Jurgis goes as follows “Oh, Believe me, believe me! She wailed again; and he shouted in fury, “I will not” (p. 150). Ona was begging for him to listen yet he remained cold and angry just as he often did. The final example of the bad sides of Jurgis is when he abandoned the family. After little Antonas had died he left the family with no way to survive and no income and went out on the road. He was selfish when his family needed him most. He was grieving the death of his child yes, but he still chose the leave the rest of the family helpless. In finality Jurgis does have numerous

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