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Kings of a Unified Israel

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Kings of a Unified Israel
Bible 105-B27 LUO: Old Testament Survey
201320 Spring 2013
Xxxxxx Xxxxxxx
L33333333
Liberty University
February 9, 2013

Kings of a Unified Israel Samuel was the last of the Judges. He was the bridge between the dark and chaotic period of the Judges to the glorious era of the Kings (Hester, 1962). He was called by God to be Judge, Priest, and Prophet for Israel. When Samuel had aged greatly, the people began to crave a new government. They want their own King. They did not understand that God was their King. They were spiritually dead. Fear was one reason for wanting a King. The leading men of Israel felt that their security demanded a strong military leader (Hester, 1962). Another reason was that of simple jealousy. Other nations had a King, so they wanted one as well. They desired the splendor of royalty to be observed in one man that would represent Israel. Samuel tried to warn them of what a King would do to their lives, and told them that God was their King, but it was ignored. Samuel took their request and repeated it to the Lord. God answered, “Listen to them, and give them a king.” (I Samuel 8:22, NIV). Instead of being set apart as a nation for God, they coveted what other nations had. They rejected God. Samuel was now searching for a man that God chose and would send to him. When Samuel caught sight of Saul the Lord said, “This is the man I spoke to you about; he will govern my people” (I Samuel 9:17, NIV). Unaware that God made the choice, Israel was elated when Samuel presented Saul as their King. They were impressed with him physically, yet knew nothing of his heart. The Bible describes Saul as, “an impressive young man without equal among the Israelites – a head taller than any of the others” (I Samuel 9:2, NIV). The events surrounding the selection of Saul for King demonstrate that he was the

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