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Kite Runner

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e Runner begins with our thus-far nameless protagonist explaining that the past cannot be forgotten. A single moment in time defined him and has been affecting him for the last twenty-six years. This moment was in 1975 when he was twelve years old and hid near a crumbling alleyway in his hometown of Kabul, Afghanistan. When the protagonist's friend, Rahim Khan, calls him out of the blue, he knows that his past sins are coming back to haunt him even in the new life he has built in San Francisco. He remembers Hassan, whom he calls "the harelipped kite runner," saying "For you, a thousand times over." Rahim's words also echo in his head, "There is a way to be good again." These two phrases will become focal points for the rest of the novel and our protagonist's story.

Chapter Two
The protagonist remembers sitting in trees with Hassan when they were boys and annoying the neighbors. Any mischief they perpetrated was the protagonist's idea, but even when Hassan's father, Ali, scolded Hassan, he never told on the protagonist. Hassan's father was a servant to the protagonist's father, Baba and lived in a small servant's house on his property. Baba's house was widely considered the most beautiful one in Kabul. There Baba held large dinner parties and entertained friends, including Rahim Khan, in his smoking room. Though the protagonist was often surrounded by adults, he never knew his mother because she died in childbirth. Hassan never knew his mother, either, because she eloped with a performance troupe a few days after his birth. The protagonist always felt a special affinity with Hassan because he too was motherless. It was not a surprise that Hassan's mother, Sanaubar, left Ali. The only things these first cousins had in common were being of the Hazara ethnicity and the Shi'a religion. Otherwise, Sanaubar was nineteen years younger than Ali, gorgeous, and reportedly promiscuous. Meanwhile Ali was a pious man afflicted by paralysis of the lower face muscles and a crippled leg. Rumor had it that Sanaubar taunted Ali for his disabilities just as cruelly as strangers and refused to even hold the infant Hassan because of his cleft lip.
One night, after hearing so many insults thrown at Hassan because he was Hazara, the protagonist secretly read a summary of Hazara history. He found out that the Hazara people were descended from Moguls, owing to their flattened, "Chinese-like" facial features. The Hazaras were brutally oppressed throughout their history for being Shi'a instead of Sunni Muslim. His own people, the Pashtun, oppressed the Hazaras. The protagonist wondered why Baba had never told him any of this. He pitied Hassan for being a hated minority because he was an unusually gentle and kind person, "incapable of hurting anyone." In lieu of the boys' mothers, a kindly woman nursed and sang to both of them. Ali used to remind the boys that they were bound together because they had "fed from the same breasts." The boys were indeed like brothers. The protagonist explains that his first word was "Baba" while Hassan's was his name, "Amir." He says that the event that transpired in 1975, to which he alluded in Chapter One, was "already laid in those first words."
Chapter Three
Amir describes Baba as being a huge and intimidating man who stood six feet, five inches tall and was purported to have wrestled a bear because of the long scars on his back. Despite his huge size, Baba was softhearted. He even devoted three years to funding and building an orphanage. Amir was proud to have such a successful father. Together with Rahim Khan, Baba owned several successful businesses and he had also married well; Amir's mother, Sofia Akrami, was a highly respected and educated poetry professor of royal descent. However, Baba's successes took him away from home and from Amir most of the time. When he was present, he was usually aloof.
One day in school, a Mullah or Muslim teacher told Amir and his classmates that drinking was a sin. When he got home, Amir asked Baba, a frequent drinker, about what the teacher had said. Baba told Amir that ultra religious people were not only wrong in their convictions but dangerous. He said, prophetically, "God help us all if Afghanistan ever falls into their hands." Then he explained to Amir that the only sin is stealing, whether a piece of property or a life. Baba knew about having things stolen firsthand; his father's life was stolen by a thief who stabbed him to death while robbing his house. Amir was grateful that Baba spoke to him so personally, but felt a simultaneous guilt for not being more like his father. He always felt that Baba hated him a little for 'killing' his mother as he was born.
Because Baba was aloof and often absent, Amir turned his attention to books. By the age of eleven, he could recite more poetry than anyone in his class at school. Baba wanted Amir to be an athlete like him, but Amir was not talented at soccer and did not have an interest in Baba's choice sport. Once, Baba took Amir to the yearly Buzkashi tournament. Buzkashi is a traditional Afghani sport in which a "highly skilled horseman" called a chapandaz from one team must retrieve an animal carcass from inside the other team's stampede and drop it in a special scoring circle while being chased by chapandaz from the other team who try to steal the carcass from him. As they sat watching the tournament, Baba pointed out Henry Kissinger, who was sitting in the bleachers, to Amir. Before Amir had a chance to ask Baba who Henry Kissinger was, one chapandaz fell off his horse and was trampled to death. Amir cried all the way home while Baba tried unsuccessfully to hide his disgust at his son's weak disposition. Back at home, Amir overheard Baba complaining to Rahim Khan about how Amir was always lost in his books and did not stand up for himself. Rahim Khan told Baba that he was self-centered, but Baba maintained that Amir was "missing something." Amir heard him say, "If I hadn't seen the doctor pull him out of my wife with my own eyes, I'd never believe he's my son."

Analysis
Though brief, Chapter One of The Kite Runner sets the tone for the entire novel. Before we know anything about the protagonist, including his name, we learn that one moment in his past has defined his entire life. We do not learn exactly what the moment is until Chapter Seven. This tells us that the event has significance beyond its detail; it is not so much specifically the rape, but more generally the betrayal, that makes that moment in time so central to Amir's life. We also discover in the short first chapter that Amir has been trying to forget his secret for the last twenty-six years. His betrayal of Hassan haunts him continually throughout his life, but it is not until he is 'caught' that it spurs him to action-and then, very reluctantly. When Amir thinks he is alone with his secret, he can pretend it does not exist. Once he finds out that Rahim Khan knows what he did, he cannot hide from it anymore. Khaled Hosseini makes extensive use of foreshadowing in The Kite Runner, including Baba's statement, "God help us all if Afghanistan ever falls into [the religious fundamentalists'] hands," which anticipates the Taliban's takeover decades later. Hosseini's use of foreshadowing connects him to the genre of magical realism. Even though there are no supernatural events in the novel, there is an underlying sense that every action has significance and must come full circle.
From the foreshadowing in Chapter One, we can surmise that Amir's guilt has something to do with Hassan. That an event involving Hassan has defined Amir's entire life indicates Hassan's monumental importance as a character. Amir feels powerless as a child, so he takes out his frustrations on his unsuspecting best friend. He lords his privileges and his education over Hassan, but in reality it is Hassan who has power over him. We can tell this even from the title, which refers to Hassan (though also to Amir at the story's end). The most obvious indicator of Hassan's importance is the fact that Amir does not mention his own name until he reveals that it was Hassan's first word. It is as though Amir as we know him does not exist without Hassan, as though Hassan's voice-representing his influence-made Amir come into being.
The theme of loyalty is central to the novel. Amir's lack of loyalty to Hassan is what keeps him rooted to that one moment in the winter of 1975. Hassan's unflinching loyalty to Amir is what results in his rape, his leaving Wazir Akhbar Khan, and one could argue, his death many years later. We learn the basics of Amir and Hassan's relationship early on, as embodied in their mischief making. Amir is a child of privilege who wants attention, so he feels safe and even entitled to getting into trouble. Yet his insecurity and fear of Baba makes him unable to stand up for himself or take credit for his mistakes. In contrast, Hassan is a servant who has a very close and constant relationship with his father, Ali. Ali has taught Hassan to be so righteous and loyal that he would not dream of starting trouble and does not hesitate to cover up for Amir. As we learn, Hassan is so determined to protect Amir and not to cause anyone grief that he keeps his rape a secret. The difference between Amir and Hassan underscores the connection between loyalty and family. Hassan is loyal and long-suffering just like Ali, who kept the secret that Baba had an affair with Sanaubar and that Hassan was not his biological son. Amir betrays Hassan just as Baba betrayed Ali, and like Baba, Amir must suffer for what he did and pay retribution.
The theme of loyalty is connected to the theme of silence and secrets. Remaining silent about injustice is Ali and Hassan's way of showing loyalty to Baba and Amir. The story of The Kite Runner is filled with things untold or unspoken. Baba's adultery, Hassan's rape, and Amir's betrayal of Ali and Hassan are examples of things untold. One major unspoken thing in the boys' household is the difference between Pashtuns and Hazaras. Amir does not even know why the Pashtuns demean the Hazaras until he secretly reads a history book. It is only twenty-six years later, when General Taheri refers to Sohrab as a "Hazara boy," that Amir breaks his silence about this issue and demands respect for Sohrab. Another major unspoken truth in the household is the lack of mothers. Sanaubar gets little attention until the end of the novel, when she reappears in Hassan's life and redeems herself by caring for Sohrab. Baba maintains such silence about Amir's mother, Sofia Akrami that he assumes Baba blames him for her death. He learns more about her from the beggar in Kabul than he ever did from his own father. The key secret keeper and revealer in the story is Rahim Khan, who protects secrets for Baba, Ali, Hassan, and Amir. Ultimately, he is the one who insists on Amir's redemption.
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Chapters 24–25
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Key Facts
Important Quotations Explained
1. “That was a long time ago, but it’s wrong what they say about the past, I’ve learned, about how you can bury it. Because the past claws its way out. Looking back now, I realize I have been peeking into that deserted alley for the last twenty-six years.”
Explanation for Quotation 1 >>
At the outset of Chapter 1, just as the book begins, Amir writes these words. With them, he hints at the central drama of the story and the reason he is telling it. To the reader, the quotation functions as a teaser. It piques the reader’s interest without revealing exactly what Amir is talking about, and from the time period Amir mentions, twenty-six years, the reader gets an idea of just how important this moment was. As the story unfolds, we realize that the deserted alley Amir refers to is where Hassan was raped, and that this event has largely defined the course of Amir’s life since. This is what Amir means when he says that the past continues to claw its way out. Try as he might to bury it, he was unable to because his feelings of guilt kept arising. As a result, he figuratively continues peeking into the alley where Assef raped Hassan, literally meaning that he keeps going over the event in his mind.
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2. “A boy who won’t stand up for himself becomes a man who can’t stand up to anything.”
Explanation for Quotation 2 >>
Baba says these words to Rahim Khan while he is talking about Amir at the end of Chapter 3, and the quotation reveals important traits in both Amir and Baba. With these words, Baba sums up one of Amir’s major character flaws—his cowardice—and Baba shows how much value he places in standing up for what is right. Baba is reluctant to praise Amir, largely because he feels Amir lacks the courage to even stand up for himself, leaving Amir constantly craving Baba’s approval. Amir’s desire for this approval as well as his cowardice later cause him to let Assef rape Hassan. The quotation also foreshadows the major test of Amir’s character that occurs when he must decide whether to return to Kabul to save Sohrab. As Amir searches for redemption, the question he struggles with is precisely what concerned Baba: does he have the courage and strength to stand up for what is right?
3. “Huddled together in the dining room and waiting for the sun to rise, none of us had any notion that a way of life had ended.” (p. 36)
Explanation for Quotation 3 >>
This quotation occurs at the beginning of Chapter 5, as Ali, Hassan, and Amir hide inside from the gunfire they hear in the street that signals the coup by Daoud Khan, which ended Afghanistan’s monarchy. Though the effects of this coup were not immediately apparent, the coup ushered in an era of political instability that would essentially ruin Afghanistan. The way of life Amir refers to is the lifestyle that he, Baba, Ali, and Hassan knew before the coup, when Kabul was still safe and stable. For Amir in particular this meant a relatively idyllic life spent going to school, flying kites, and playing with Hassan, made possible because Baba was wealthy. But in the years after the night Amir describes when the coup occurred, violence and murder plagued the city, forcing Baba and Amir to leave Afghanistan and with it everything they owned. As a result, almost overnight everything Amir knew growing up in Kabul changed.
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4. “I actually aspired to cowardice, because the alternative, the real reason I was running, was that Assef was right: Nothing was free in this world. Maybe Hassan was the price I had to pay, the lamb I had to slay, to win Baba.”
Explanation for Quotation 4 >>
When Amir says this, toward the end of Chapter 7, he has just watched Assef rape Hassan,and rather than intervene, he ran away. Amir says he aspired to cowardice because, in his estimation, what he did was worse than cowardice. If fear of being hurt by Assef were the main reason he ran, Amir suggests that at least would have been more justified. Instead, he allowed the rape to happen because he wanted the blue kite, which he thought would prove to Baba that he was a winner like him, earning him Baba’s love and approval. The price of the kite, as Amir says, was Hassan, and this is why Amir calls Hassan the lamb he had to slay. He draws a comparison between Hassan and the lamb sacrificed during the Muslim holiday of Eid Al-Adha to commemorate Abraham’s near sacrifice of his son to God. In this context, Hassan was the sacrifice Amir had to make to get the kite and ultimately to gain Baba’s affection.
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5. “My body was broken—just how badly I wouldn’t find out until later—but I felt healed. Healed at last. I laughed.” (p. 289)
Explanation for Quotation 5 >>
This quotation occurs during Amir’s meeting with Assef as he tries to find Sohrab in Chapter 22. Assef beats Amir with brass knuckles, snapping Amir’s ribs, splitting his lip and busting his jaw, and breaking the bone beneath his left eye, but because Amir feels he deserves this, he feels relief. He thinks he should have accepted the beating from Assef years ago, when he was given the choice of saving Hassan—and likely getting physically hurt—or letting Assef rape Hassan. Since that time, Amir has struggled with his guilt, which was only made worse by the fact that he was never punished for his actions. He had even gone looking for punishment in the past, as when he tried to get Hassan to hit him with the pomegranates, because he felt then there would at least be some justice for the way he treated Hassan. But Amir’s guilt lingered until his confrontation with Assef, which despite the physical pain, made him feel psychologically healed. Thus, while Assef beat him, he began to laugh.
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Important Quotations Explained
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Study Questions and Essay Topics
Key Facts full title · The Kite Runner author · Khaled Hosseini type of work · Novel genre · Bildungsroman; Redemption story language · English time and place written · Los Angeles, CA; 2001 - 2003 date of first publication · May 2003 publisher · Riverhead Books narrator · The Kite Runner is narrated by Amir four days after the final events of his decades-long story. point of view · The narrator speaks in the first person, primarily describing events that occurred months and years ago. The narrator describes these events subjectively, explaining only how he experienced them. At one point, another character briefly narrates a chapter from his own point of view. tone · The tone is confessional, expressing profound remorse throughout the story tense · Past tense with extended flashbacks setting (time) · 1975 through 2001 setting (place) · Kabul, Afghanistan; California, United States protagonist · Amir major conflict · After failing to intervene in the rape of his friend Hassan, Amir wrestles with his guilt and tries to find a way to atone for his actions. rising action · Forced out of Afghanistan by the Soviet invasion, Amir flees to the United States, where he tries to rebuild his life until an old friend offers him a way to make amends for his past. climax · Amir returns to Kabul, where he finds Hassan’s son, Sohrab, and encounters Assef, the man that raped Hassan twenty-six years earlier. falling action · Amir rescues Sohrab from a life of physical and sexual abuse and struggles to learn how he and Sohrab can recover from the traumas each has endured. themes · The search for redemption; the love and tension between fathers and sons; the intersection of political events and private lives; the persistence of the past motifs · Rape; irony; regressing in time symbols · The cleft lip; kites; the lamb foreshadowing · Baba wonders if Amir will be able to stand up for what is right when the time comes; Baba worries that Islamic fundamentalists will one day control Afghanistan; Hassan threatens to shoot Assef’s eye out; Assef vows revenge on Amir. * * Symbols, Imagery, Allegory * Setting * POV/Narrative Voice * Genre * Tone * Style * What's Up With the Title? * What's Up With the Ending?
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What’s Up With the Ending?
OK, so without the force of the preceding paragraphs and chapters, the ending to The Kite Runner is going to sound like one big non-event. This is pretty much what happens: Amir and Sohrab are at a park. Amir gets Sohrab to fly a kite with him, they're getting into it, and Amir vividly remembers Hassan, Ali, and the sounds and smells of Kabul. Sohrab smiles. Also, when Amir asks if Sohrab wants him to chase after the defeated kite, he thinks he sees Sohrab nod. The book ends with a middle-age man sprinting after a kite. This all sounds pretty silly.

However, with earlier events of the novel in mind, it's not so silly. (On a personal note, we also want to justify the tear-fest that happened when Shmoop finished the book.) There's even an outside chance that book-jacket words like redemption and atonement apply here. With traumatic events, what precedes the terrible event often becomes a psychological trigger. This is the case with kite fighting for Amir. Right before he betrays Hassan, Amir participates in a kite-fighting tournament. And so when Amir fights a kite in the park with Sohrab, we half-expect Amir to break down in tears. He doesn't. We think this means Amir goes some way in reclaiming (dare we say "rewriting") his past. As he flies the kite, memories of Kabul come flooding back in a beautiful and moving passage. For most of the book, memory has literally been a nauseating affair, but now it brings joy to Amir.

Still, we're not sure if Amir has really redeemed himself. Sohrab's smile and nod at least suggest redemption is possible. Said another way: Sohrab's gestures suggest it's possible that Amir, by taking in Sohrab, has atoned or made amends for both his betrayal of Hassan and his father's betrayal of Ali. Sohrab has become a sort of stand-in for Hassan (he even looks like Hassan). So, Amir's goodwill toward the boy is a way for Amir to finally do the right thing. Add to this the fact that Sohrab has been utterly silent for a year, that Amir and Baba never talked about their betrayals, and the smallest form of communication suddenly seems really, really important. Sohrab's smile hints at confession and peace after years and years of silence and guilt. That said, Sohrab's gestures are so small and so slight we wonder if Amir really has redeemed himself.

Previous Page: What's Up With the Title?

* * Symbols, Imagery, Allegory * Setting * POV/Narrative Voice * Genre * Tone * Style * What's Up With the Title? * What's Up With the Ending?
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What’s Up With the Title?
So, this is a catchy title. That's probably the first thing you notice about it. The second thing you might notice about the title is that Hosseini didn't name the book The Kite FIGHTER. Which means Hosseini didn't title his novel, weirdly enough, after his main character. (Even though Amir narrates pretty much the whole novel and is the protagonist.) Why would Hosseini put Hassan – a Kite RUNNER – at the center of the novel? One answer might be that Hassan haunts Amir and is, in one way or another, the subject of Amir's thoughts for pretty much his whole life.

It's also worth mentioning that at the end of the novel, Amir does become a kite runner. The book ends with Amir running a kite for Sohrab. It seems to be another step on his path to redemption that he does for Hassan's son what Hassan used to do for him.

We also need to point out that the title insists on the symbolic and narrative importance of kite fighting. Why is kite fighting so important? Isn't it just a game Amir and Hassan play? We're glad you asked. Kite fighting precedes the horrific rape scene in the novel. It's a symbol of both innocence and the loss of innocence. You can also see it as a symbol of redemption (see "Symbols, Imagery, Allegory: Kite Fighting" for more).…...

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...are gone and I am alone staring at the mess I created. As I do this, I notice my new white shirt is blemished with red blotches. Apparently the impact of the smash was so hard, the punch somehow managed to reach me. I take it off, disgusted-- it is the evidence of my crime, a token that will trigger bad memories to flow in my head. But instead of tossing it, I decide to use it to clean up the damage. After glass and punch are off the floor, I then decide I might as well clean the entire gym-- all with that stained shirt. Cleaning will not bring back the night, but it will ease the pain I caused. At least now the Associated Student Body will not have to clean the gym themselves. If there is one lesson I learned from Khaled Hosseini’s The Kite Runner, it would be just that: “There is a way to be good again,” (2). Though it is Rahim Khan who verbalizes it, polar characters Baba and Amir are the ones who demonstrate that no matter how severe a sin is committed, redemption is possible and the pursuit of reaching inner satisfaction and peace can live on. In the novel, there is a tale that Baba once wrestled a black bear in Baluchistan with his bare hands. Whether it is valid or not, it acts as a metaphor for what Baba can and would do. No matter how dangerous and hard of a task is, he will take the initiative and take on whatever is needed to be done. Such an example is when he stands up to a Russian soldier who wants a half hour with a lady as an exchange to let the truck pass......

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Kite Runner

...Summer Reading The Kite Runner response Due Friday, August 21, beginning of class Three pages, double-spaced Hand in paper copy, submit a copy to Blackboard Below are three prompts from past AP Literature and Composition tests. Choose one of them and apply it to The Kite Runner in a three-page, double-spaced essay. Use evidence from the text to support your ideas (this can come in the form of quotations or references to scenes in the book.) Do not rely upon summative sources such as Spark Notes. Grading Criteria: There is a grading rubric in the Summer Reading folder for you to consult describing the grading standards for this paper. A word on how to avoid the most common mistake for this type of paper: This is a textual analysis, not a summary. Do not simply summarize the story again—write about the important aspects of the story that the prompt requests. There is a sample outline at the end of this document to illustrate how you can structure your paper so you stick with the prompt. Prompt #1 Critic Roland Barthes has said, “Literature is the question minus the answer.” Considering Barthes’ observation, write an essay in which you analyze a central question The Kite Runner raises and the extent to which it offers answers. Explain how the author’s treatment of this question affects your understanding of the work as a whole. Prompt #2 Describe how a minor character in your novel serves as a foil, or opposite, to the main character. Then......

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The Kite Runner

...The Kite Runner shows that loss of innocence has devastating consequences on a person’s life. Khaled Hosseini’s, The Kite Runner, demonstrates the way in which the loss of virtue can tarnish a person’s life and have severe ramifications. Innocence can be tainted by traumatic childhood events; however, the person’s ability to move past this experience is determined by their strength and willingness to do so. Many people, who have lost their virtue, possess the mental stamina to move past their experiences and ease the impact it has on their life. Hassan is a character who compellingly reflects this notion. On the other hand, the main protagonist Amir believes he is unable to escape the guilt of his betrayal. It is his perpetual focus on his past that ultimately exacerbates the impact of his tarnished innocence on his life. However as time progresses, the impact his loss has on his life acts as an impetus to recovering and provides Amir with the motivation to move on and overcome the past experiences. At times people choose to chase the loss of innocence and willingly welcome the consequences it brings. Often the ramifications appear devastating to external figures but to individual the effects and desired. Assef evocatively reflects this idea and uses his loss of innocence to impose his corrupt sentiments onto others. Although a loss of virtue can result in severe repercussions in an individual’s life, their internal motivation and strength to overcome its impact allows......

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Kite Runner

...Book Review of ‘The Kite Runner’ “For you, a thousand times over”, this sentence said by Hassan to Amir has been on my mind since I finished reading the novel. The story took place in the 70s in Afghanistan. Amir was a child of a wealthy family and Hassan was the son of Amir family`s servant, Ali. They played and grew up together; the strong friendship bonded them like brothers. As can be seen from the novel and the sentence at the beginning, Hassan was willing to do anything for Amir whenever Amir encountered any troubles. Nevertheless, Amir made a terrible mistake when he watched and stood by, while Hassan was raped by Assef after winning the unprecedented grand kite game. In order to drive Hassan out of the house, Amir put his watch under Hassan`s pillow, implying that Hassan had stolen it. When Russia invaded Afghanistan, Amir left his hometown with his father and fled to Pakistan. In 1988, Amir and his family/father had a nice life when Amir graduated, having attended a public college in California. Afterwards Amir became a famous novelist. However, Amir suffered agonies of remorse as he could not forgive himself for his unatoned sin for betraying Hassan. At the end, Amir started his journey of redemption and came back to his home town and saved Sohrab (son of Hassan) from the Taliban after he received a phone call from Rahim Khan. The characters of this novel feel real because it is a biography of the author. The destiny of Hassan was miserable, not only was he......

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The Kite Runner

...THE KITE RUNNER One December 2001 I became what I am today at the age of twelve,on a frigid overcast day in the winter of 1975.I remember the precise moment ,crouching behind a crumbing mud wall,peeking into the alley near the frozen creek.That was a long time ago,but it’s wrong what they say about the past,I’ve learned,about how you can bury it .Because the past claws its way out.Looking back now.I realize I have been peeking into that deserted alley for the last twenty-six years. One day last summer,my friend Rahim Khan called from Pakistan.He asked me to come to see him.Standing in the kitchen with the receiver to my ear,I knew it wasn’t just Rahim Khan on the line.It was my past of unatoned sins.After I hung up ,I went for a walk along Spreckels Lake on the northern edge of Golden Gate Park.The early-afternoon sun sparkled on the water where dozens of miniature boats sailed,propelled by a crisp breeze.Then I glanced up and saw a pair of kites,red with long blue tails,soaring in the sky.They danced high above the trees on the west end of the park,over the windmills,floating side by side like a pair of eyes looking down on San Francisco,the city I now call home.And suddenly Hassan’s voice whispered in my head:For you,a thousand times over.Hassan the harelipped kite runner. I sat on a park bench near a willow tree.I thought about something Rahim Khan said just before he hung up,almost as an afterthought .There is a way to be good again.I looked up at those twin......

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Kite Runner

...English A The Kite Runner Ending the Cycle of Violence The movie I chose was The Kite Runner along with the theme “There is a way to be good again.” I will be focusing on the character of Amir and how he uses forgiveness to move on from his past and to end the violence. He shows this through many ways throughout the movie with different people. Amir had a tough childhood in many ways but also was very privileged. He had challenges being friends with Hassan. They were from two different social classes and Amir got teased and ridiculed because of it. When things got tough Amir froze Hassan out. For example when Hassan was physically assaulted. Finally Amir and his dad left altogether when there home got taken over by soldiers after the fall of the Monarchy in Afghanistan. Amir was so guilt tripped for leaving his friend, in the movie he takes us on his journey of how he finds forgiveness and gives forgiveness to move on from his violent past. Amir does not try to contact Hassan when he left, trying to push it behind him but the guilt is too much and he is curious to what happened to his friend. He becomes a successful writer and takes a trip back to his home and finds out Hassan was killed when things got dangerous. Amir sets off to right his wrongs and starts with Hassan’s son. He tracks him down in an orphanage and makes a plan to rescue him from the dangers of Kabul. Seeking to do the right thing and right his wrongs from the past. He tries to forgive himself......

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The Kite Runner

...Backstabbing the Ones we Love The book The Kite Runner by Khaled Hossein is a book about betrayal. On Dictionary.com the word betrayal is define as to be unfaithful in guarding, maintaining, fulfilling, or to disappoint the expectation or hope of other. Amir is constantly betraying the ones he loves especially his best friend Hassan one of Amir most loyal and caring friend. Amir throughout the book seems to accept the fact he hurts the ones he loves and even though Amir knows he is in the wrong constantly continues to betray and hurt his only friend Hassan and does these throughout the book. First, Amir betrays Hassan by denying his friendship in the book and being a jerk to him to make himself feel better. Amir betrays Hassan by denying his friendship. In the book Amir was asked if Hassan was his friend but instead of saying yea he just tell them that he is just his servant. This shows how crappy a friend Amir really is and how he is so embarrassed to let people know that Hassan is his friend. A real friend is proud to be your friend and wants people to know. What a betrayal on Hassan and Amir Friendship, a real friend is always your friend no matter what and isn’t your friend just sometimes or whenever he wants. Amir enjoys being a jerk to Hassan to make himself feel better. Amir knows that Hassan can’t read so he makes him feel stupid but making him read a book to show that he is superior to him. Amir also started to throw pomegranates at Hassan just because he is mad...

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Free Essay

Kite Runner

...The Kite Runner: Reader’s Notes Cindy Kang Theme | Literary Device | Character Development | Chapter | Quote | Insight | | Imagery/flashback | | 1 | “I became what I am today at the age of twelve, on a frigid overcast day in the winter of 1975. I remember the precise moment, crouching behind a crumbling mud wall, peeking into the alley near the frozen creek. That was a long time ago, but it’s wrong what they say about the past, I’ve learned, about how you can bury it. Because the past claws its way out. Looking back now, I realize I have been peeking into that deserted alley for the last twenty-six years… One day last summer, my friend Rahim Khan called from Pakistan. He asked me to come see him. Standing in the kitchen with the receiver to my ear, I knew it wasn’t juts Rahim Khan on the line. It was my past of unatoned sins.” (p. 1) | The introduction paragraph gives the reader an insight of the narrator’s haunting past. The narrator uses descriptive words (crumbing mud wall) and is evidently a gifted story teller. The structure of his writing easily grasps the attention of the audience. The tone of the story seems to be frightening and melancholy due to the author’s diction, syntax, and level of formality. The first page mostly consists of flashbacks more so by recalling them rather than reliving them. If flashbacks continue to recur, the past may symbolize an important theme throughout the story. | | Personification | | 1 | “Because the past claws its way......

Words: 3498 - Pages: 14