Premium Essay

Labatt Blue Case Study

In: Business and Management

Submitted By mdshahahsan
Words 2004
Pages 9
Marketing Background

Labatt Blue was launched in 1951. The nickname “Blue” originated in Manitoba due to the colour of the label and the company’s support of the Winnipeg Blue Bombers football team. –

External Influences

Economic Trends:
The Canadian economy shrank in this year's second quarter for the first time since the end of the recession in mid-2009. Statistics Canada said gross domestic product contracted 0.4 per cent between the second and first quarters of this year, when expressed in annualized terms. That's the weakest performance since the 3.7 per cent decline seen in the second quarter of 2009. Although the recession has past and Canada has improved, the unemployment rate in Canada was last reported at 7.4 percent in November of 2011. A decline of 53,000 in part-time work was partially offset by an increase of 35,000 in full-time. Compared with a year earlier, the number of part-time workers was down 1.9% (-62,000), while full-time employment grew by 2.0% (+274,000).

Social and Demographics:
Marketing communications has always played a key role in creating an image to attract a target market. Budweiser and Bud Lite are popular brands in the NFL and NASCAR, and true fans will then purchase those specific brands. It becomes their brand of choice. Labatt Blue had sponsorship ties with the NHL and Canadian teams and the CFL and several teams but recently, Molson has taken over the sponsorship of The Toronto Maple Leafs, which Labatt used to have. This was a huge loss for the company as Toronto is the largest city in Canada and generates one-fifth of the gross domestic product of Canada. This being said, The Air Canada Center sells Molson Canadian rather than Labatt at hockey games. There are 18,800 seats at the Air Canada Center, and say at least 16,000 people purchase at least one beer, which costs $8.00, that is $128,000 in sales that Labatt...

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Case Study:

...Case Study: Labatt Blue When preparing a case solution it is expected that students will conduct additional secondary research. The capture of good information will enhance the quality of the analysis and the recommendation. Marketing Communications Plan Model Use the following model for completing a marketing communications plan. These points should be addressed in your presentation (20 minutes)....

Words: 2775 - Pages: 12

Premium Essay

Coor's Light Promotion Plan

...08 Fall Promotional Plan Executive Summary Naturally brewed with no added preservatives in Golden, Colorado, the heart of the Rockies, Coors Light is the eighth leading beer brand in the world. As Molson Coors’ largest brand, the new parent company after the 2005 merger, Coors Light has established itself as the biggest selling brand in both the US and Canada. The merger, however, left the company heavily indebted and with limited capital suffered a loss of partnering and sponsorship for major sporting events. Coors Light has worked extremely hard to maintain the positioning as ‘The Worlds Most Refreshing Beer” withstanding the susceptibility the brand faces with only a single brewing site and third party distributors. This promotion plan includes the following objectives for the upcoming year: * To attract non-users and create brand awareness among 90% of females aged 21-30 seeking a refreshing tasting light beer, * To retain the 18-24 year old male target currently held by Coors Light. * To engage the mobile community through the use of Mobile Insider, connecting the brand to consumers. The objectives should be met through various promotional activities tied closely to the company’s long-standing brand image, and mobile promotions to increase accuracy in reaching target markets. Over the next 12 months it is recommended that Coors Light continue to use the Maxim Golf Experience to maintain the current......

Words: 8921 - Pages: 36

Premium Essay

Mountain Man Case Study

...os t 2069 rP MAY 28, 2007 HEIDE ABELLI yo Mountain Man Brewing Company: Bringing the Brand to Light It was February 20, 2006, in the New River coal region of West Virginia. Chris Prangel, a recent MBA graduate, had returned home a year earlier to manage the marketing operations of the Mountain Man Beer Company (MMBC), a family-owned business he stood to inherit in five years, when his father, Oscar Prangel, the president and owner, retired. Mountain Man brewed one beer, Mountain Man Lager, also known as “West Virginia’s beer.” • • • • No tC op Due to changes in beer drinkers’ preferences, the company was now experiencing declining sales for the first time in the company’s history. In response, Chris wanted to launch Mountain Man Light, a “light beer” formulation of Mountain Man Lager, in the hope of attracting younger drinkers to the brand. Over the previous six years, light beer sales in the United States had been growing at a compound annual rate of 4%, while traditional premium beer sales had declined annually by the same percentage. Earlier that day, Chris met with a regional advertising agency about a marketing campaign to launch Mountain Man Light. Back in his office, he watched an agency videotape from a focus group. He observed a half-dozen participants, 21 to 55 years old, showing various reactions to proposals to extend the Mountain Man brand to a new light beer product. A man in his fifties leaned into the......

Words: 5644 - Pages: 23

Free Essay

Chapter Two the Organizational Environment

...Chapter TWO THE ORGANIZATIONAL ENVIRONMENT CHAPTER CONTENTS Overview of the Chapter 2 Learning Objectives 2 Key Terms 2 Lecture Outline 3 Learning Objectives Revisited 9 Lecture Enhancers 10 Notes for Topics for Discussion and Action 12 Notes for Building Management Skills 16 Notes for Management For You 17 Notes for Small Group Breakout Exercise 17 Notes For Managing Ethically 19 Notes For Web Exercises 19 Notes for You’re the Management Consultant 19 Notes for Management Case 20 Notes for Management Case in the News from the pages of Business Week 21 Overview of the Chapter This chapter examines the organizational environment in detail. It identifies the principal forces—both task and general—that create pressure and influence management and thus affect the way organizations operate. It concludes with a study of several methods that managers can use to help organizations adjust and respond to forces in the organizational environment. Learning Objectives 1. Explain why being able to perceive, interpret, and respond appropriately to the organizational environment is crucial for managers’ success. 1. Identify the main forces in an organization’s general and task environments, and describe the challenges that each force presents to managers. 1. Discuss the main ways in which managers can manage the organizational environment....

Words: 9140 - Pages: 37

Premium Essay

Redhook Ale Brewery

...30 Stephen E. Barndt aul Shipman, Chief Executive Officer of Redhook Ale Brewery, knew that he needed to reevaluate his strategy and its execution. Redhook's rapid growth had ended shortly after it invested in a major increase in production capacity. Operating at about 50% of production capacity, the company suffered a net loss in 1997 that continued into 1998. Redhook brewed only specialty beer, referred to as craft beer. Craft beer is a more flavorful, fuller bodied premium beer. follows traditional old world brewing methods. and uses high-quality materials. The company started as a microbrewery but grew continually and reached national status by the end of 1996. Shipman, one of Redhook's founders, had guided the company from a small player in one city to a leading position as a national competitor and aimed at dominating the craft beer segment of the domestic beer industry. The company's three small-batch breweries. two in the Pacific Northwest and one in the Northeast, had a combined design capacity of 575.000 barrels (each containing 31 gallons) per year of Redhook branded beer to tap a growing market for craft beer. However, growth in the craft beer market attracted attention, and competition grew from other microbreweries, brewpubs, regional specialty brewers, and from large mass-market brewers. With increased competition, 1996 saw the beginning of a downturn with a reduction in sal•• ~and profitability. P I Ccmpany History Redhook was started in 1981 by......

Words: 4478 - Pages: 18

Premium Essay

Social and Cultural Environments

...Rogers’ classic study on the diffusion of innovations helps explain how products are adopted over time by different adopter categories. The adoption process that consumer go through can be divided into multi-stage hierarchy of effects. Rogers’ findings concerning the characteristics of innovations can also help marketers successfully launch new products in global markets. Recent research has suggested that Asian adopter categories differ from the Western model. An...

Words: 7481 - Pages: 30

Premium Essay

Kjhgfd

...A REPORT ON MOBILE MARKETING Submitted by Aatish Khemka INTRODUCTION Mobile marketing is marketing on or with a mobile device, such as a cell phone. One definition comes from marketing professor Andreas Kaplan who defines mobile marketing as "any marketing activity conducted through a ubiquitous network to which consumers are constantly connected using a personal mobile device". Within this definition, Kaplan uses two variables, i.e. the degree of consumer knowledge and the trigger of communication, to differentiate between four types of mobile marketing applications: Strangers, Victims, Groupies, and Patrons. Mobile marketing can also be defined as “the use of the mobile medium as a means of marketing communication”, the “distribution of any kind of promotional or advertising messages to customer through wireless networks”. More specific definition is the following: “using interactive wireless media to provide customers with time and location sensitive, personalized information that promotes goods, services and ideas, thereby generating value for all stakeholders". Mobile marketing is commonly known as wireless marketing, although viewing advertising on a computer connected to a home local area network is not considered to be mobile marketing. Mobile Marketing involves communicating with the consumer via cellular (or mobile) device, either to send a simple marketing message, to introduce them......

Words: 4624 - Pages: 19

Free Essay

Consumer Behaviour and Target Audience Decisions

...C H A PTE R CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR AND TARGET AUDIENCE DECISIONS 3 Chapter Objectives • To understand the consumer decision-making process and how it varies for different types of purchases. • To understand various internal psychological processes, their influence on consumer decision making, and implications for advertising and promotion. • To understand the similarities and differences of target market and target audience. • To understand the various options for making a target audience decision for marketing communication. Marketers Seeking 50-Plus Consumers Nintendo is famous for its video games. DaimlerChrysler features a wide selection of car brands. Tabi is known for its classic women’s clothing. While seemingly unrelated, these brands have recently shared a similar strategy. As these established companies expanded beyond their current customer base, each brand attempted new marketing communication programs containing a more emotional message aimed at the 50-plus demographic. The 50-plus crowd not only is a sizable market, but also is a very lucrative one; they control 55 percent of all discretionary spending in Canada due to their relatively high net worth. And while the brands all looked toward the fifty-plus market, additional segmentation based on an understanding of consumer behaviour revealed subtle differences in their approach. For Nintendo, the saturated youth market proved to be a no-growth avenue. With industry sales hitting the billion-dollar......

Words: 10240 - Pages: 41

Premium Essay

Organizational Behavior

...ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR CONCEPTS CONTROVERSIES APPLICATIONS Seventh Edition Stephen P. Robbins 1996 Contents Part One • Introduction Chapter 1 What Is Organizational Behavior? 2 Chapter 2 Responding to Global and Cultural Diversity 42 Part Two • The Individual Chapter 3 Foundations of Individual Behavior 80 Chapter 4 Perception and Individual Decision Making 130 Chapter 5 Values, Attitudes, and Job Satisfaction 172 Chapter 6 Basic Motivation Concepts 210 Chapter 7 Motivation: From Concepts to Applications 250 Part Three • The Group Chapter 8 Foundations of Group Behavior 292 Chapter 9 Understanding Work Teams 344 Chapter 10 Communication 374 Chapter 11 Leadership 410 Chapter 12 Power and Politics 460 Chapter 13 Conflict, Negotiation, and Intergroup Behavior 502 Part Four - The Organization System Chapter 14 Foundations of Organization Structure 548 Chapter 15 Technology, Work Design, and Stress 588 Chapter 16 Human Resource Policies and Practices 634 Chapter 17 Organizational Culture 678 Part Five - Organizational Dynamics Chapter 18 Organizational Change and Development 714 CHAPTER I • WHAT IS ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR? What Managers Do Let’s begin by briefly defining the terms manager and the place where managers work—the organization. Then let’s look at the manager’s job; specifically, what do managers do? Managers get things done through other people. They make decisions, allocate resources, and direct the activities of others to attain goals. Managers......

Words: 146017 - Pages: 585

Premium Essay

Philip Kotler Book

...Marketing Management, Millenium Edition Philip Kotler Custom Edition for University of Phoenix Excerpts taken from: A Framework for Marketing Management, by Philip Kotler Copyright © 2001by Prentice-Hall, Inc. A Pearson Education Company Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 Marketing Management Millenium Edition, Tenth Edition, by Philip Kotler Copyright © 2000 by Prentice-Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, in any form or by any means, without permission in writing from the publisher. Compilation Copyright © 2002 by Pearson Custom Publishing. This copyright covers material written expressly for this volume by the editor/s as well as the compilation itself. It does not cover the individual selections herein that first appeared elsewhere. Permission to reprint these has been obtained by Pearson Custom Publishing for this edition only. Further reproduction by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system, must be arranged with the individual copyright holders noted. This special edition published in cooperation with Pearson Custom Publishing Printed in the United States of America 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Please visit our web site at www.pearsoncustom.com ISBN 0–536–63099-2 BA 993095 PEARSON CUSTOM PUBLISHING 75 Arlington Street, Suite 300, Boston, MA 02116 A Pearson Education Company SECTION ONE Understanding Marketing Management Marketing......

Words: 231198 - Pages: 925