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Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Material Needed Methodology Shelina.N.Bhamani 5-6 English (Creative Writing) Tuesday, March 29, 2005 45 mins Shape Poem The Student will be able to: 1=Share and write more creactive ideas. 2=Describe different objects Papers Pens Charts Markers Colours OHP(OHT)for the presentation of sample poem(WB can be used too) PRESENTATION: The Teacher will ask the student following questions.(How many of you like butterfly/balloon? Why ou like balloons/butterfly? Do you love poems(yes/no) well,then lets try to write one. Teacher will show an example or two like of balloon(MY RED BALLOON IS LIKE AN AEROPLANE WITHOUT WINGS.IT FLOATS LIKE A BIRD IN THE SKY.A STRONG WIND MAKES MY BALLOON RUN FAST AND TO THE GROUND.POP!OHNO..PIECE OF RUBBER DRIFTING TO THE GROUND)Than SS will asked to choose shapes draw it and write a peom inside that shape) for production you can display all the shapes poems on the school board /bulletin board/soft board.. production stage could be considerd as evaluation

Evaluation

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Material Needed Methodology Sonia Sham Dupte grades 3-4 language arts Tuesday, March 01, 2005 30 mins telling a story Students will learn how to use descriptive and imaginative language to tell a story. * Telling a Story pictures (allow each student to choose their own picture) * paper * pencils Discuss with students the structure of a good story. Stress that a good story has a beginning, middle, climax, and end. Read a sample story to the class. Have the class discuss what you read, particularly the structure and components of the story. Ask them what makes the stories good or interesting. Have students select one of the "Telling a Story" pictures about which to write their stories. Have each student study the picture selected and think about the story that is being told, as well as the characters and setting. If time permits, allow students to read their stories aloud to the class. Teachers will note improvements in student's memory, concentration and listening ability through story telling and writing. This activity will strenthen writing skills and develop the imagination as well.

Evaluation

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Material Needed Methodology Shazia Khan grades 1-3 mathematics Tuesday, March 01, 2005 45 mins how to reason Students wil learn to make conclusions from facts in a logical way, or to reason. none Geometric Shapes Have the students draw and cut out paper shapes of rectangles, squares, trapezoids, and triangles. Discuss their different properties. For example, talk about the number of equal and unequal sides. Then, ask questions about the shapes. For example, How are they alike or different? or Which do you see more/less of? Have the students look around their houses, apartments, or neighborhoods for examples of shapes. place value Review the following fact: the place of a digit in a numeral tells its value. 325-3 has the place value of hundreds, 2 has the place value of tens, 5 has the place value of ones Have students look for numbers in everyday experiences. For example, the values of page numbers in a book or on a restaurant menu. Then, ask questions about the place value of digits, such as What place do you think the 3 is in the number 36? Even/Odd Numbers Review the following facts: Even numbers end with 0, 2, 4, 6, or 8. Odd numbers end with 1, 3, 5, 7, or 9. Help the child to recognize even/odd numbers in everyday life. Ask how the child applied reasoning to his or her recognition.

Evaluation

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Sajida Farooqui Pre-primary Music Tuesday, January 11, 2005 30 minutes Hide and seek with "Where Is Thumbkin?" Children should be able to: -learn new vocabulary. -gain confidence through representation. -sing and act individually and in groups. -learn co-ordination and taking turns in time. -enjoy themselves..! none. 1.Teach the students the song" "Where Is Thumbkin". 2. Choose five students to represent thumbkin, pointer, ring man, old man and pinkie. 3. Have the students hide somewhere in the room. 4. The rest of the students sing "Where is thumbkin, where is thumbkin?". The student who is "thumbkin" will stand and sing "Here I am! Here I am!". The rest of the students will sing "How are you today, Sir?". Thumbkin will answer by singing "Very well I thank you!". The class will sing "Run away! Run Away!"(when the class sings this, thumbkin will go back to his/her hiding place). The class will repeat this process for all hiding students (pointer, ring man, old man, pinkie). 5. Then the class will sing "Where is everybody? Where is everybody?" and all 5 hiding students will stand and sing "Here we are! Here we are!". The class will sing "How are you today sir?" and the 5 students will sing "Very well I thank you!". The class will then sing "Come back home! Come back home!" (at that time, all 5 students will join the class). 6. This activity can be stretched to include "groups" of students representing the 5 parts of the song (instead of only 1 student per part). My students love to do this activity! Enjoy! Young children can get confused taking turns in time and in coordinating,teachers can evaluate if students have gained mastery with repetition and practice.Shy students can be encouraged to represent and a change in their attitude should be noticed.

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Evaluation

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Erum Amir 6 Science Tuesday, January 11, 2005 45mins Plants Students will do the following: 1. Investigate how seeds are dispersed. 2. Understand the variety of seed dispersal that exists in the plant kingdom. 3. Understand how factors in the natural environment can effect how far a seed is dispersed. Students will need the following: • Variety of seeds • Magnifying glass or microscope • Meter stick • Fan • Small dry seed, one for each student (bean or watermelon) • Paper (to be cut for winddispersed seed demonstration) 1. Have students collect a variety of different seeds from the school grounds, their yard at home, an unmowed field, or the grocery store. Common seeds to collect include coconut, maple, ash, elm, dandelion, milkweed, grasses, burdock, jewelweed, wisteria, cedar, watermelon, pumpkin, tomato, acorn, and apple. 2. Explain that most seeds have some type of dispersal mechanism or characteristic that enables the seed to scatter or travel a distance from its parent plant. Seeds may disperse by wind, water, animals, burrs, or mechanical means, depending on the habitat. A seed’s dispersal mechanism often reflects the conditions within the habitat. Have students consider why it is important for plants to have their seeds dispersed away from the parent plant. 3. Set up a number of stations in the lab for each type of seed collected. Each station should include a magnifying glass or a microscope so students can observe small seeds. 4. At each station, students should · describe the seed’s characteristics, · sketch a diagram of the seed, · label the diagram with significant seed parts, · hypothesize how the seed is dispersed, and · list conditions in the habitat that affected seed dispersal. 5. Following is a list of common seeds that may have been collected, listed by their dispersal mechanism. (Note that seeds may utilize more than one dispersal mechanism.) Share the list with your students. Did they correctly identify the dispersal mechanisms and conditions within the habitat that affected seed dispersal? Dispersal Mechanism Seed Type water coconut wind maple, ash, elm, dandelion, milkweed, grasses burr burdock mechanical jewelweed, wisteria animals cedar, watermelon, pumpkin, tomato, acorn, apple 6. Give each student a small dry seed, such as a bean or watermelon seed. Have students design a wind-

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dispersed seed mechanism for their seed. The wind-dispersed seed should be designed to travel the farthest distance. All students should use the same supplies for their seed design: feathers or paper, tape or glue. 7. Have the students drop their seed designs, all from the same height, in front of a room fan. Next, have them measure the distance their seed traveled. Repeat trials should be made, with calculations of the average distance traveled. 8. Have students discuss what design worked best. How would they improve their design? The students could research to find a naturally occurring seed that is similar to their designed seed. Evaluation Discuss results with the class and evaluate students on their oral contributions. Display the students’ seed sketches and grade them on the amount of scientific information shown. The seed dispersal lab can be evaluated as a traditional lab report.

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Kanwal Abbas 4 Science Tuesday, January 11, 2005 45mins Reptile adaptations Students will understand the following: 1. Adaptation describes the changing traits that enable reptiles to live in their environments. 2. Adaptations can be found in physical and behavioral traits of reptiles. Snakes and lizards, turtles, crocodilians, and the tuatara constitute the living orders of reptiles. • Chalkboard or chart paper • Marker • Classroom Worksheet • Research resources (e.g., Internet, CD-ROMs, encyclopedia, etc.) • Construction paper • Pencil 1. Share an amazing fact with students: At one time, giraffes came in a variety of neck lengths. Some giraffes had much shorter necks than modern giraffes. Ask students to brainstorm why short-necked giraffes did not survive. Then offer an explanation of natural selection: The giraffes with shorter necks couldn’t compete with long-necked giraffes. Explain that the giraffes were not in an actual contest that they could win by changing their physical characteristics or behavior; they were unknowing participants in a competition that takes place every day in nature: Food supplies are limited so animals must compete for them with other species and like animals. Unlike the giraffes with long necks, short-necked giraffes couldn’t reach leaves and twigs up high as well as the ones closer to the ground. Because many animals could eat the low-lying vegetation, fewer shortnecked giraffes got enough to eat. Over generations, giraffes with longer necks grew stronger and healthier. The long-necked giraffes had more and more babies that, like their parents, inherited long necks and were better able to survive when food was scarce; no other animal could reach the high leaves as well as they could. Over time, more and more short-necked giraffes died before they could reproduce more short-necked babies. Eventually, only long-necked giraffes were born. This process of change, called “natural selection,” happens in all species. 2. Explain that a giraffe’s long neck is an adaptation, a trait that helps it fit in and survive in its environment. Tell students that sometimes different species within the same family have very different adaptations that depend on location. For example, the Siberian tiger has striped fur while the snow leopard sports a

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white and black coat. These adaptations allow each species of cat to meet the challenges of its different environment. The Siberian tiger’s striped fur keeps it disguised in the dense forest of China; the snow leopard’s white fur helps it hide in its snowy environment. 3. On the chalkboard or chart paper make three columns. Label the first column “Animal,” the second column “Adaptation,” and the third column “Effect.” Fill in the first two columns with some sample animals and their adaptations. Then, ask students the effect of each animal’s adaptation. Encourage students to add their own ideas to the list. Here are a few examples to start the list: Animal Adaptation Effect Giraffe Long neck Can eat leaves in tall trees (the parts of plants other animals can’t reach) Bird Flies south in winter Warmth Porcupine Sharp, stiff quills Can defend itself against enemies Chipmunk Hibernate Can avoid winter food shortages Dolphin Tail Helps it swim 4. Point out the two types of adaptations: physical and behavioral. A polar bear’s thick fur, which protects it from the cold, is an example of a physical adaptation. A lizard that “plays dead” to avoid predators is displaying a behavioral adaptation. 5. Invite students to review the adaptations discussed earlier and identify each as either behavioral or physical. 6. Ask students to brainstorm about reptiles, noting their responses on the chalkboard. Add the following traits to the list if the students haven’t already (or circle them if they’re already on the list), explaining that these are definitive traits of all reptiles: · breathe through lungs, · have an internal skeleton with a central backbone (vertebrate), · are cold-blooded (body temperature is directly related to its surroundings). 7. Explain to the class that reptiles have been living on Earth for over 300 million years. They’ve been able to survive because of specific traits, both physical and behavioral, that enable them to live in their environments. Then, introduce students to the following types of living reptile with these fun facts: · Turtles spend most of their lives in the water and have plated shells covering their bodies. · Lizards have great vision and use their tongues to taste their surroundings. · Crocodiles lose their teeth chomping on prey, but new sets always grow in. · Snakes can go a long time without eating, but when they do, their meal is usually another animal. · The tuatara is similar to a lizard, but the tuatara has a third eye and an extra row of teeth. 8. Divide the class into groups of two or three students. Assign each group one of the following reptiles to research: snapping turtle, rattlesnake, iguana, American alligator, chameleon, tuatara, sea turtle, python, Nile crocodile. You might allow them to select a different reptile of their own choice. 9. Print out and distribute the Classroom Worksheet: Reptile Research to help guide students’ research. They will be creating a description of the reptile including what it looks like, where it lives, what it eats, what eats it, and its adaptations. 10. When groups complete their research, instruct them to make a diagram of their reptile with labeled descriptions of the animal’s adaptations. Be sure they draw lines from the illustration to each description. If necessary, show models of other types of

diagrams. Evaluation You can evaluate your students on their research and diagrams using the following three-point rubric: · Three points: research report includes a thorough and well-written description of the reptile including what it looks like, its preys, its predators, and a description of two or more adaptations and how they have helped the animal survive; the accompanying diagram is labeled accurately and includes thorough descriptions of the reptile’s various features and adaptations · Two points: research report is adequate and includes some description of the reptile and an explanation of at least one of the animal’s adaptations; the diagram is partially labeled with some description of the labeled parts · One point: little research was completed, and descriptions are poorly written; no adaptations are described, or they are described incorrectly; diagram is sketchy and does not included labels with descriptions. You can ask students to contribute to the assessment rubric by determining criteria for well-written research reports and diagrams.

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Marium Kamal 4 Scioence/Geography Friday, January 07, 2005 3 class periods Animal Habitats Students will understand the following: 1. The Earth supports many different habitats, each of which has distinct features and distinct plant and animal populations. 2. Animals and plants are adapted to the conditions of the habitats in which they live. For this lesson, you will need: • Research materials on habitats • Computer with Internet access • Materials needed by groups for their projects 1. Tell students they are going to form groups to research different habitats of the world. Each group will produce a report on its habitat including the following information: 1. A physical description of the habitat 2. Examples of the habitat (geographical locations) 3. Examples of animals and plants that live in the habitat In addition, each group will be given a specific assignment that will require the group to show how the animals in the assigned habitat are adapted for life there. 2. On the chalkboard, write the names of the different habitats students will investigate: grasslands (or savanna), temperate forest, tropical rain forest, desert, polar ice, tidepools. Then divide your class into six groups, assigning each group one of those habitats to research. Following are specific assignments for each group. 3. Grasslands (savanna): Research the speeds of animals that live in the African grasslands. Project: Create a display that compares the different speeds of these animals. Write an explanation for why speed is important for survival in the grasslands. (There are few trees or places for animals to hide in grasslands habitats. Therefore, speed is important for both predators that are hunting and animals that are fleeing predators.) 4. Temperate forest: Explain to students that in the winter, less water is available for trees to take in through their roots, because much of the water in the ground is frozen. Since trees lose water through their leaves, losing leaves is a way for a tree to conserve water. Coniferous trees do not lose nearly as much water through their needles as deciduous trees lose through their leaves. Project: Put a twig from a coniferous tree (cone-bearing tree with needles instead of leaves) in a cup of water, and tightly fasten a clear plastic bag around its needles. Put a twig from a deciduous tree (leafy tree that loses its leaves in the fall) in a cup of water, and tightly

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fasten a clear plastic bag around the leaves. Observe what happens. Draw pictures and write an explanation for what you observed. (There will be more water droplets on the inside of the bag covering the leaves, showing that leaves lose more water than do needles.) 5. Tropical rain forest: Describe the three main levels of the rain forest—canopy, understory, and forest floor. Project: Make a diagram or model showing examples of animals and plants that live on each level. Choose an animal or plant from each level and explain how it is adapted to its particular place in the tropical rain forest. (Canopy examples: monkeys can use arms and legs and sometimes even tails to swing from branch to branch; birds such as parrots have specialized feet with two curling front toes and two curling back toes to help them hang on to branches. Understory example: snakes such as boa constrictors spend their days curled around branches or vines. Forest floor example: jaguars’ spots help them to be better hunters by making them hard to see among the speckled shadows of the rain forest floor.) 6. Desert: Choose a desert animal or plant. Project: Make a model of it, draw it, or describe it. Explain how it is particularly well adapted to survive in a place where there is very little water. (Plant example: the saguaro cactus has an expanding trunk that allows it to take in a great deal of water when water is available. The saguaro has stored-up water during the long desert dry periods. Animal examples: many desert animals dig burrows in the sand to stay cool in the intense heat; many desert animals sleep during the day and are active at night, when the temperature is lower.) 7. Polar ice: Research both the polar bear (North Pole) and the penguin (South Pole). Project: Draw or make a model of each animal. For each animal, explain at least three ways—physical or behavioral characteristics—in which it is well adapted for life in a very cold and snowy climate. (Polar bear examples: two layers of fur and an extra layer of fat under its skin keep it warm; ears are very small so that very little heat can escape from them; paws are huge to help spread out its weight over the snow and keep it from sinking in; it builds snow dens to keep its babies warm in winter; it has white fur that helps it blend in to its surroundings.) 8. Tidepool: Explain how a tidepool is formed, and describe several animals that are found in tidepools. Project: Make two models of a tidepool—one at high tide and one at low tide. Use sand, rocks, salt water, and other materials (e.g., modeling clay) for your models. Draw at least three tidepool animals and explain how they survive in a constantly changing habitat (sometimes wet, sometimes dry). (Examples: periwinkles, limpets, and barnacles attach themselves to rocks by suction so they will not be swept away when the tide goes out; the incoming tide brings food to clams, oysters, and mussels—all they have to do is open up their shells and tiny bits of animals and plants flow in.) 9. When students have completed their assignments, have each group present its project to the class. Discussion Questions: 1. Compare a cheetah to a top athlete. In what types of sports would cheetahs excel? 2. Many trees grow in the temperate forest. Talk

about several ways in which the animals that live in the temperate forest depend on trees. 3. The tropical rain forest is home to more species of animals than any other habitat, and yet the rain forest is in danger because so many rain-forest trees and other plants are needed for many products we use. Can you devise a plan to preserve the rain forest without depriving human beings of products on which they depend? 4. Humans, as well as animals, live in the desert. Compare and contrast the ways in which humans and animals have adapted to life in this habitat. 5. Many scientists believe that, as a result of global warming, the polar ice cap is beginning to melt. Discuss what the effects that the melting of the polar ice cap might have on the rest of the world. Can anything be done to stop or slow down the process of global warming? 6. Imagine that you are a tidepool animal, and describe a day in your life in the tidepool. What difficulties do you have to overcome? What are the positive aspects of life in a tidepool? Evaluation You can evaluate groups on their projects using the following three-point rubric: Three points: fulfills all requirements of assignment; project carefully prepared; group works well together; presentation well organized Two points: fulfills most requirements of assignment; project satisfactorily prepared; group works well together most of the time; presentation satisfactory One point: fulfills few requirements of assignment; project carelessly prepared; group has problems working together; presentation disorganized

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives fatima akhtar 1-5 art Thursday, December 23, 2004 30 mns junk art -to foster creativity, imagination and original thinking from an early age. -to develop a concept of recycling and reusing things people would normally throw away. used/empty boxes, cartons, bottle caps,left over art material, glue, scotch tape, scraps of card paper, buttons,etc. Tell the students it is Junk Art Day and they can make anything they WANT, like a submarine, or a car, guitar, etc. Provide them with glue (teacher helps in gluing) crayons, markers, scissors, etc. The students have a very good imagination so they'll have no trouble in finding something to build. They will have a BLAST!!! Try it... this is an excellent time filler and can be incorporated in everyday routine.record and assess how children become confident and take pride in their work...most of all note how they enjoy the freedom to "create"their own models.

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Evaluation

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Ambreen Malik 2 Geography Thursday, December 16, 2004 45mins/over two lessons Space Students will: 1. Understand the relationship of the nine planets in our solar system to the sun by creating a three-dimensional representation. 2. Understand the planets’ relative distance from the sun and their approximate size in relation to the Earth. For this lesson, you will need: • round balloons, different sizes • poster paint and paint brushes • fishing line (or strong string) • construction paper • newspaper torn into strips about one inch wide • papier mache paste • S-clips to suspend models from ceiling (large paper clips bent into L shapes or strong loops of tape will work as substitutes)

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Methodology 1. Before you begin the activity, you will need to make a batch of papie mache paste. 2. When the paste is ready, divide your students into nine groups. Assign each group a planet. Provide each student with a copy of the 'Planet Information Sheet'. Ask your students to fill in the sheet using information they gather from library books, the Internet, or their text book. The Planet Information Sheet can include: A picture of the planet and questions relating to its size, colour and climate. 3. While they are working, turn a class bulletin board into a huge sun using construction paper. Invite any students who finish their research early to add solar flare designs to the sun. 4. Give each group a balloon. Explain to your students that all of the balloons should not be blown up to the same size. Emphasize that approximate size is all that is necessary, but that the big planets should be noticeably larger than the smaller ones—especially Pluto. 5. Provide each group with a long piece of fishing line. Ask them to tie the line around the end of their balloon. 6. Provide each group with a supply of space paste and newspaper strips. Instruct them to dip each strip into the paste, gently pull it through their fingers to wipe off extra clumps, and then paste it onto balloon. They should use many layers, working until the balloon is covered completely. Encourage them to apply extra layers to make their balloons seem as round as possible. (The planets aren’t perfect spheres, so they don’t need to worry too much about roundness.) 7. Allow the balloons to dry. While they are drying, students should decide how they are going to paint the surface of their balloons. Which colors will really bring out the physical landscape? When the balloons are ready— which might not be for a while—have students paint them. 8. While

the painted planets are drying, meet with each group to determine where its planet should hang in relation to the sun image. You can use these approximations for distance from the sun: Mercury—58.9 million km, Venus—108.2 million km, Earth—149.6 million km, Mars—227.8 million km, Jupiter—778 million km, Saturn—1,427 million km, Uranus—2,870 million km, Neptune—4,500 million km, Pluto—5,900 million km. When the group has chosen a location, affix the dried planet model to the ceiling using the fishing line and the Sclips. Attach the appropriate Planet Information Sheet to each model. 9. When the project is complete, you might want to invite other classes to come visit. Evaluation Were the objectives of the lesson met? Were the students able to cooperate with each other during group work? Was the Planet Information Sheet filled out correctly?

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Amna Farhan 1 Geography/Maths Thursday, December 16, 2004 45mins Animals Students will understand: 1. Elephants are the largest land animals. 2. Adult elephants are about 11 feet tall, and newborn elephants are about 3 feet tall. For this lesson, you will need: • String and a tape measure • A ladder 1. To give students an appreciation for the size of an adult African elephant—approximately 11 feet tall—measure and cut a length of string 11 feet long. 2. Stand up on a ladder, chair, or table; hold the string in your hand above your head, and let it hang down to the floor so that students can see its entire length. 3. Ask students if they can think of an animal that is as tall as the string is long. Depending on how students answer, tell them that a giraffe can grow taller than the length of the string—to 18 feet—and that a camel is shorter—never more than 6½ feet. If students don’t immediately identify the target animal as an elephant, give them clues based on other prime characteristics of the animal. You may also make the point that though a giraffe is taller than an elephant, elephants weigh much more. At over 6 tons, the elephant is the largest land animal. 4. Make a project of working with the class to find other objects in the school or outside the school that are as tall as the string is long—or somewhere around 11 feet. Suggestions include cabinets in the classroom or in school offices, decorative or supporting columns inside or on the outside of the school building, and trees in the area. 5. Now work with a string only 3 feet long—the height of a newborn elephant—and do the same comparison activities. 6. Help students make lists of things that are 11 feet tall and things that are 3 feet tall. Put the words adult elephant or a picture of one at the head of one list and the words baby elephant or a picture of one at the head of the other list. Conduct an informal evaluation of students’ language when they make comparisons in this project. If they use double comparisons (“An elephant is more taller than a camel”), make a note to give students practice in correct usage.

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Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Huma Shahid 4 Science/Maths Thursday, December 16, 2004 45mins The Human Body/Bones Students will understand the following: 1. The relationship between the size of the bone and the length of healing time. 2. The importance of a survey questionnaire. 3. The basics of data collection and graphing. • paper • pencils • markers or dot stickers • large construction paper or bulletin board paper 1. To begin the lesson, ask your students if any of them have ever broken a bone. Lead a short discussion on broken bones and the treatments that students received. Then ask your students the following question: Do you think it takes a large bone longer to heal than it takes a short bone to heal? Accept student responses as guesses for this question. Then tell students that they are going to try to answer that question by gathering information from their schoolmates. 2. Next, ask your students to work as a class to generate a list of questions for a survey on broken bones and healing time. (Questions might include: Name and age? Have you ever broken a bone? Which bone did you break? Did you have a cast? How long was the cast on? How long did it take your bone to heal? Did you require any physical therapy or special exercises afterwards?) 3. When the class has decided on questions, take your students to other classes to conduct the survey. (You will obviously need to get permission from other teachers to visit their classes beforehand.) Try to visit as many classes as possible, because the more data you have, the more information you can organize. 4. When the survey is complete, have your students plot their data on a large graph. The vertical axis should be labeled “Length of Healing Time” and divided into weeks. The horizontal axis should be labeled with the different bones that appeared in the survey. Using markers or dot stickers, have your students plot points for the healing times for each broken bone; there should be several points for each kind of broken bone, and some of the points may overlap. The collection of points above each bone should give a clear sense of the approximate average healing time. 5. Lead a discussion about the graph. Ask the class to note whether there seems to be a relationship between the size of the bone and the length of healing time. You can also ask students to consider why (or why

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not) a relationship exists. Evaluation You can use a five-point rubric to evaluate student work: Five points: survey questionnaire designed; survey completed with 15 responses; graph designed correctly; data entered correctly on the graph; student participates in discussion. Three points: survey questionnaire partially complete; survey completed with 10 responses; graph designed correctly, but with minimal labeling; some participation in discussion. One point: survey questionnaire incomplete; survey completed with five responses; graph partially designed, not labeled; student does not participate in discussion.

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Sambreen Malik 1-5 music/creative arts Wednesday, December 15, 2004 2 class periods creative music lessons -Students should be able to understand how music can be used to create ideas and pictures in a listener's mind. -Identify specific types of sounds that make people feel specific ways. (This is a lesson that all of my classes have loved because it lets them be creative through listening to music. This lesson can be used with the same class numerous times as long as you simply change the music played for the class.) -Students should be able to understand how music can be used to create ideas and pictures in a listener's mind. -Identify specific types of sounds that make people feel specific ways. For this lesson plan all you need is a CD/cassette player with your choice of several CDs/cassettes, one pencil and one piece of blank paper for each student. 1. Play examples of music that represent something children are familiar with, for example the music of "dil dil pakistan"or any popular poem/song. 2. Have students sit at a desk or on the floor where they can comfortably draw while listening to music. 3. Distribute one paper and one pencil to each student. 4. Have the students write their names in a specific corner of the paper (I find students always focus better and try harder when their name is the first thing to go on the sheet). 5. Tell the students that you will be playing short musical pieces for them and they are going to draw imaginary pictures on their papers. They should go through three steps: a) first, they should listen to the music for at least ten seconds. b) second, get an idea of what the music represents. e.g. certain places, nature, people playing, scary monsters... c) have the students draw what the music makes them think of. There are no rules telling them what they have to draw as long as they can say the drawing came from what they heard. (If you want to add one rule you may say that they can not draw anything offensive, use your own discretion). 6. Each example should take from one to two minutes to play and extra time can be given for students to finish their drawings. 7. Once the students have finished drawing, you may ask what people came up with and compare student's ideas, stressing that in this activity there are NO wrong ideas. ADD-ON ACTIVITIES You may have the students divided into groups (four students) in a

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following class and have them put all of their drawings together into a kind of comic book story. Depending on the class you may have them tell the story to the rest of the class while the original corresponding music is playing. Evaluation Have students create debates after they have come up with what they believe the music is supposed to represent. The class can be divided in as many as four teams with all of the members of each team agreeing on the position of a spokesperson. It is interesting to see why students believe certain music sounds like "nice animals playing" and other students think the same music sounds like "people in a war".

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Material Needed Methodology sonia sham dupte preschool character education Wednesday, December 15, 2004 2 class periods the giving chair This activity helps children give and accept compliments and learn how to treat others. * 1 chair * 1 wrapped box (empty) Explain to the children that we can give presents to others that are just as nice as gifts in a box. These gifts are called compliments. When we smile or say something nice to another person, it's like giving a gift. Have each child sit in a "special chair", hold the gift-wrapped box, and say something nice to a fellow classmate. The receiver of the compliment then takes the "gift" (box), sits in the chair and offers a compliment to another child. Continue until all have received a "gift".The teacher may offer compliment suggestions such as "I like it when you play with me" or "I'm glad you're my friend" to stimulate possible responses from the children. observe closely how children treat each other in the coming days. listen to children's conversation during the school day/s to see them giving special compliments,being friendly and positive towards each other. Also note how children respond to recieving compliments.

Evaluation

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Material Needed Methodology saima naaz shaikh pre-primary/ primary general knowledge Wednesday, December 15, 2004 weekly theme/can be done throughout the school yea stranger danger To teach students about the dangers of going with strangers. * popsicle sticks * scraps of cloth material * glue * white chart paper * Lesson 1: STRANGERS- Buddy system * Lesson 2: STRANGERS- Adults do not need help from a child! * Lesson 3: STRANGERS- Have a password * Lesson 4: STRANGERS- Know some ways to get away * Lesson 5: STRANGERS- Know your phone number and address Intro: Ask students if their mom or dad have ever talked to them about going anywhere with strangers. Have the students that answer yes tell the rest of the class what their parents or grandparents told them. Ask them why they think this is important for them to remember what to do. Lesson 1: STRANGERS - Buddy system Materials: * popsicle sticks * scraps of material * glue * white paper(sturdy). Discussion: Talk to students about the importance of always going somewhere together. Every student should pick a person to be their "buddy" for the day. Explain to the kids that it is always important to have someone with you in case something should happen to you. That way the other person can go for help. It is also very important that a grown-up always knows where you are! That way they know you are safe. If you are playing outside it is VERY important that a grown-up or another child is with you so no one tries to take you in their car! Activity: 1. Have each student make two stick puppets out of paper and then use the material to make a dress or short to put on the person they made. Have them make two puppets each to remind them they always need a buddy with them! Lesson 2: STRANGERS - Adults do not need help from a child! Discussion: Talk to students about how many bad adults try to steal children by telling them they need help carrying something or getting something out of their car. If someone asks them for help, say "No, but I can get another adult to help you!" NEVER get close to a person's car to look at something or to get something from the person, such as candy or a game. Always walk home with someone after school or to their cars. Lesson 3: STRANGERS - Have a password Discussion: Talk to your students about the importance of not

listening to anyone who says your mom or dad sent them to pick you up. Explain to students that many children have been taken from their schools and playgrounds because they were told their mom or dad sent someone to pick them up! Activity: 1. Have students go home with a letter from the teacher explaining about the weeks theme of STRANGER DANGER. Explain in the letter the importance of having a code word that a person has to know in order for them to pick them up. Make sure that only the child and the mom or dad knows that code word! Also have the mom or dad spend some time talking to the child about what to do in case the child should get lost somewhere such as the super market/bazaar. 2. Have the students come back to school the next day and talk about the discussion with their mom or dad. Also the teacher could bring in a missing child's poster and talk about how this child was taken and their mom and dad miss them very much! Lesson 4: STRANGERS - Know some ways to get away Discussion: Talk to kids about what they could do if someone grabbed them and tried to take them to their car. Activity: 1. Some of the best things to do are: Scream and yell this person is taking me! Another thing to do if there is not many people around is to bite the person very hard and then run as fast as you can! 2. Have the kids practice yelling and saying, "This person is trying to take me!": Get them used to being assertive! Most children are not used to acting without thinking and the more prepared they are the faster they will be able to react. Lesson 5: STRANGERS- Know your phone number and address Discussion: Many children who get lost do not know their full name and address. Explain to the children how important it is to talk clearly and slowly so people who can help them can understand what they are saying. Tell children if they are lost it is important to go to a grown-up. If a police officer or someone who works at the place is around that is the first person they should go to. Activity: 1. Have on a card each child's name and address along with their phone number. 2. Practice with them saying their name and phone number. Make sure they are saying it clearly and slowly so it can be understood. 3. It is also important that the children know their mom's and dad's first names. Have them tell you that also. 4. I would send a home a letter to the parents about what you are working on and have them be practicing this at home also! Evaluation I really feel strongly about this subject and I hope other teachers will use this information to help children not get abducted from strangers. Send home a letter to the parents about what you are working on and have them be practicing this at home also. Ask the parents for feedback, if children have become cautious and weather they innitiate talk about the subject themselves or not.

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Material Needed Methodology shazia khan pre-primary general knowledge Wednesday, December 15, 2004 1 week(approximately an hour a day) body parts To learn about the parts of the body. * large sheets of paper/newspaper (child-sized) * crayons * black permanent marker 1. Have each child lay down on a child sized piece of newspaper/ paper. 2. Tell the children that you are going to draw the outline of their bodies, using the permanent marker. 3. After the outlines are drawn, have the children use the crayons to color their outfits on to their body. The outfits should match what they are wearing, such as blue shorts and a red shirt or the coluor of their uniforms. 4. Now have the children tell you what each body part is: such as their legs, arms, mouth, nose, eyes, etc. 5. The teacher can label the body parts for the children, or some of them may be able to write their own body parts on their picture. 6. Have the children add and color their hair, eyes, mouth, ears, shoes, etc. 7. When the bodies are done, they look great displayed in the room. The kids love to show people which one is them! I did this with my kindergartners during the last half of kindergarten. At this point, they were able to partner up and draw the outlines for each other. There were a few children who required assistance from me, but most did a good job. The partners also were able to help each other with the coloring. Since the children did a lot of the work themselves, this project took several class periods to complete!

Evaluation

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Material Needed Methodology Mehvish Sajjad 2 General Science Thursday, January 08, 2004 40 minutes Light Light can pass through transparent materials, but it does not pass through opaque objects. Piece of glass, piece of wood, candle and torch Piece of glass, piece of wood, candle and torch Switch off the lights in the classroom and ask the children, how do they feel. The possible responses can be, "it has become dark", "we can't see anything". Switch on the lights and discuss few sources of light with them. The possible responses can be tube light, bulb, sun and candle. Tell them that now we are going to do an activity. Light a candle and place it behind the piece of glass, ask them whether they can see the light? Now place the candle behind the piece of wood and ask them, can they see the light now? The possible responses would be, they could see the light passing through the glass, whereas the light did not pass through the wooden piece. Let the children try out with torch and candle with different transparent and opaque objects like plastic, paper, marble, book and tile if available. They can try this with different objects in the environment.At the end of the lesson give them the vocabulary of 'transparent' and 'opaque'. Give them a worksheet with the statements written on light passing through different objects. They have to write true and false.

Evaluation

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Material Needed Methodology Batool Javed 2 General Science Thursday, January 08, 2004 40 minutes Shadows Shadows are cast in the opposite direction from the source of light. Shadows of objects change in length during the day. Torch, pictures of shadows of morning, afternoon and evening Switch off the lights of the classroom and show shadows of different things in the classroom with the help of the torch. Point out the direction of the source of light and point out the direction of the shadow. Let the children observe. Ask them if the direction of source of light and shadow are the same? Take the children out of the classroom and let them observe different shadows and discuss its length and direction. Show them pictures of different times of the day with shadow and discuss its direction and length. Also tell them to observe shadows of different things during different times of the day, like morning, afternoon and evening for two days to share in the class. Divide the children into three groups and assign morning, afternoon and evening time to each group.Tell them to draw shadows of different objects and then share with the whole class.

Evaluation

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Material Needed Methodology Shahid Malik 3 English Language Thursday, January 08, 2004 40 minutes The Conquest of Mecca Learn synonyms Learn Opposites Make sentences Becoming aware of History and the origin of Islam Cards with synonyms and opposites, Worksheet, Model of Masjid, small slips of paper with questions written on it. Make the children read the lesson with jigsaw reading. Discuss the content in the whole group. Divide children in two teams. Put the slips with question inside the model of masjid. Let one child from each team, pick up a slip and the other team answer the question. Divide the children in four groups. Give synonyms card to two and opposites cards to two groups and ask them to find synonyms and opposites. Design a worksheet where children have to do MCQs activity on content of the chapter, synonyms and opposite.

Evaluation

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Material Needed Methodology Asim Siddiqui 3 Math Thursday, January 08, 2004 45 minutes Measurement Children will be able to know different formal units of measure like metre, litre and kilogram Different objects in the classroom, cups, jug and measuring tape Start the lesson by discussing the informal units of measurement such as, we measure cloth with an arm's length, distance with footsteps and length of table with handspan. Have an interactive discussion on formal units of measurement such as we measure cloth in metres, show them the measuring tape and they can measure each others' height in metres. In the same way show how capacity is measured in litres e.g milk, water and oil. Also show them how weight is measured in kilograms like vegetables, sugar and rice. You can even bring a litre jug and a weighing scale in the classroom to show the children. Let the children write different units of measurement and list the things under the headings.

Evaluation

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Zahra Mohsin KG Music/Movement Wednesday, January 07, 2004 20 minutes Song of Butterfly To introduce a song (preparing for rhythmic and melodic learning) about life cycle of a butterfly (through song and finger play To include some movement, (Children flitter around like butterfly in the class Song I am as little as can be You can hardly see I’m me For I’m curled up small inside my little cocoon Watch me break right them to you Then I’ll crawl as caterpillars do Till I get my wings and be a butterfly I’ll fly away, then I’ll fly and fly and fly so far away Begin lesson by talking to them about the butterfly, ask them simple questions like Have you seen a butterfly? Do you like butterflies? Where do you find them? Tell them a short story about a butterfly introduce cocoon/caterpillar. Ask the children to close their eyes and listen carefully while you play the tune of the song. Sing the song and ask children to join in, repeat if children enjoy the song Movement: ask children to flitter around like a butterfly. (While you hum the tune)and slowly going down on the floor to sleep (to relax them) End the lesson by one of their favourite song followed by a thank you song Try the song at a later date to see if they remember the words and sing the melody, did they enjoy it? Ask questions to assess understanding, and encourage them to relate the life cycle of the butterfly in their own words.

Material Needed

Methodology

Evaluation

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Material Needed Methodology Mary Kabiri I Maths Sunday, October 26, 2003 As appropriate Ten in a Circle Counting 1-10 objects,• One to one correspondence• A small number of counters (15-20) such as• beans or pennies, one counter different from the others• Place the counters in a circle. One counter should be different from the others (ex. one white bean in a group of red beans). Starting from any counter in the circle, each player takes a turn counting and touching each object as it is counted. If the counter touched at the count of ten is an ordinary one (red bean), it is removed from the circle. If it is the different counter (white bean), that player is out. The different counter (white bean) is not removed from the circle. The last player left is the winner. If all the counters are gone and only the different counter remains, then all the players left are winners. Variation: Rather than eliminate players, they keep the bean they land on. If they land on the different counter, they must give away a counter. At the end of the game, the child with the most beans is the winner. Source: Adapted from Polonsky et al. Submitted by: Mary Kabiri Lincoln University, Founder's Hall Jefferson City, MO 65101

Evaluation

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Material Needed Methodology Mary Kabiri 2 Maths Sunday, October 26, 2003 As appropriate Turn Overs Recognize numerals, group recognition,• match numerals with concrete representations• 2 sets of 0-9 dot cards,• 1 10 sided die• Place the cards in a pile, face down. Each player turns over one card from the pile. Players alternate rolling the die. If the dots on any players' card matches the roll of the die, that player keeps the card. If there is a tie, the cards are returned to the bottom of the pile. If there is no match, the player may roll the die two more times. If still no match, cards are returned to the bottom of the pile, new cards are turned over and a new player rolls the die. When all cards from the deck have been used, players count their cards. The player with the most cards is the winner. Variations: The range of numbers represented may be larger or smaller, depending of the abilities of the children. The game may also be played with a six sided dot die and numeral cards. Source: Adapted from Currah et al. Volume I Submitted by: Mary Kabiri Lincoln University, Founder's Hall Jefferson City, MO 65101

Evaluation

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Amy KG Maths Sunday, October 26, 2003 See the methodology section Calendar Communicaton Children will learn calendar skills by using their learning calendar log on a daily basis. Children will use their phonetic skills to fill in the calendar each day. This activity also leads to great communication between home and school. Calendar I run off a calendar for each month that has large spaces for the days and some writing on it. At the beginning of each month we fill in the Month and the year along with the days of the week. We start with the first day of the month if it does not land on a day we are in school. I ask the children what they did that day and we fill in that block on the calendar. At the end of each day, we talk about what we learned and pick one specific topic. We then phonetically fill in the number of that day and what we want to say about it. At the end of each week, the children take home their calendar and let their parents read it. If they want, they fill in the days at home for the weekend and write something significant they did while on break from school on Saturday and Sunday. They love coming back and sharing this information. I watch for parents notes back to me on the calendar as well. At the end of each month we look at all the progress we have made learning new things. They love this and I have gotten wonderful response from home about these calendars.

Material Needed Methodology

Evaluation

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Leslie Jones 2-3 Maths Sunday, October 26, 2003 Varies 21 Game In the 21 Game several skills are disguised into one activity. The first skill is addition facts to 21. The second and third skills involve problem solving and probability. dice, paper, pencil Description: The students must add with accuracy, then decide if the number they have is close enough to the desired goal of 21. When they get to the larger numbers such as 17, the students need to decide if they are going to take another chance or stop there. It is more risky to try for a higher score than to stop. The person closer to 21 without going over wins the game. 1. Pick a partner. 2. Each person has a place on the score sheet as Player 1 or Player 2, only one die per team and a pencil. You may play three games on one score sheet. 3. One person rolls the die and writes the number down, that person rolls the die again and writes the number down. Now add the two numbers together. 4. Keep rolling the die and adding the amounts until you get close to 21 without going over. Try to get as close to 21 as you can. You must decide when to stop playing! 5. When it is the second person's turn to roll the die, they do the same thing. 6. Whoever gets closer to 21 without going over, wins the game. 7. Add carefully. You may want to check your partners addition. 8. Keep playing until it is time to change partners and HAVE FUN!!! 9. We will change partners every few minutes. 10. Remember, if you go over 21 you automatically lose the game. Evluate your own results. Source:Leslie Jones Central Elementary, Central R-III, Park Hills, MO www:http://lessonplanz.com

Material Needed Methodology

Evaluation

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Material Needed Methodology Azra Three Maths Sunday, October 12, 2003 Depend upon the size of the class Fractions Students will use problem solving skills and knowledge of fractions to help them solve riddles about fractions. None Write some riddles about fractions for students to solve. For example, "The sum of the digits in my numerator and denominator is 12. I am equivalent to ¸. What fraction am I?" (4/8). The same question can be used over and over again with different numbers. Also, make up similar riddles that involve fractions in a similar way. The questions can be typed up on a worksheet for individuals or groups to work on, or they can be presented to the class to allow for them to think colletively. Nill Source: Harcourt Brace. (1994), Mathematics plus: teacherâs edition, grade 3.

Evaluation

Lesson Plan
Teacher Class Subject Date Duration Topic Objectives Material Needed Methodology Azra (Harcourt Brace. (1994). Three Maths Sunday, October 12, 2003 Depend upon the size of the class Fractions Students will use problem solving skills and knowledge of fractions to help them solve riddles about fractions. None Write some riddles about fractions for students to solve. For example, "The sum of the digits in my numerator and denominator is 12. I am equivalent to ¸. What fraction am I?" (4/8). The same question can be used over and over again with different numbers. Also, make up similar riddles that involve fractions in a similar way. The questions can be typed up on a worksheet for individuals or groups to work on, or they can be presented to the class to allow for them to think colletively. Nill

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...Lesson Plan Keysha Starks ESL 533N – SEI Advanced Methodologies of Structured English Immersion January 16, 2013 Resource 2: SIOP Lesson Plan humbley Date: January 16, 2013 Grade/Class/Subject: Kindergarten/ math/ Unit/Theme: Shapes CT Standards: K.G.A.2 Student will be able to correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall size Content Objective(s): CT.K.3.1.1 Identify objects in the classroom that match examples of the Shapes located on the Love2Learn Wall. Language Objective(s): - Student will be able to identify objects that are 2d located around the classroom to match the shapes on the fun wall. Students will identify the following shapes triangles, squares, circles, hexagons, ovals, rectangles by engaging in talk shape with a partner and drawing in my “Just Shape Me Journal”. English Language Learners 2.2-1 B.c(prek -2) join in group response at appropriate time 2.23 B.a(prek-2) make inference from visuals 2.2-2a.c(prek-20 develop vocabulary 2.2-3.Ci.(prek-2) engage in discussion with peers Key Vocabularytriangles, squares, circles, hexagons, ovals, rectangles, | Supplementary MaterialsSmart boardLove2Learn WallVelcro board and laminated pictures of items in the classroom for teacher use during carpet timeLaminated 3x5 card with shape on front and name on back Yellow “Just Shape Me Journals” according to each student levelPencils | SIOP Features | Preparation |...

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...Lesson Plan: Halmoni and the Picnic By:Sook Nyul Choi From the book Yunmi’s grandmother, Halmoni, has just moved to New York City from Korea, and she’s finding it difficult to adjust. America’s customs are so different, and Halmoni is too shy to speak English. Yunmi is afraid her grandmother will never get used to her new life and will want to return to Korea. When a picnic in Central Park is planned for Yunmi’s class, Halmoni agrees to chaperon. Yunmi hopes that meeting her classmates and teacher will help Halmoni feel more at home. But at the same time, Yuni is worried. What if the children make fun of Halmoni’s traditional Korean dress? What if they refuse to eat the unusual Korean food that Halmoni has prepared? Age: 3rd Grade Materials: “Halmoni and the Picnic” by Sook Nyul Choi traditional korean music: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TvIdBV3VouU white sheet of paper tape colors (markers or crayons) jump ropes http://www.education.com/activity/article/korean-fans/ Reading: Read the story to the class with expression and ask questions along the way. T- What kind of dress is Yunmi’s grandmother wearing? T- What kind of food is her grandmother making again? Manipulative: Hand out white pieces of paper and pieces of tape out to the class. They will make a korean fan called buchaechum. While the kids make the fans I will have traditional korean music played in the background. As the kids are making the buchaechum I will be asking......

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...Name: Michaela Wulf Date: 1-28-2013 Science Methods prekindergarten- 4th Professor: Jamal Dennis Lesson Plan # 2 Name of Activity: Making a balloon rocket Age Level it is Appropriate: This activity is age appropriate for preschoolers Number of Children: There will be ten students, to one teacher Curriculum Area(s): Science PA Learning Standard/Indicator Addressed: Physical Science- Physic: 3.2b.1- Force and motion of particles and rigid bodies. Behavioral Objectives: To have the children understand through demonstration on how to make a Balloon Rocket following the directions that are given. Materials: * 1 Balloon( round ones, even though long ”airship” balloon works best * 1 long piece of kite string (10-15 feet long) * 1 plastic straw * Tape Motivation: Ask the children how fast do they think a rocket can go? Explain to the children the activity that we will be conducting as a class. Which is how to make a balloon rocket? Procedure: Balloon Rocket: * Tie one end of the string to a chair, door knob, or other support * Put the other end of the string through the straw * Pull the string tight to tie it to another support in the room * Blow up the balloon(but do not tie it) pinch the end of the balloon and tape the balloon to the straw * Let go and watch the rocket fly! Closer: At the end of the experiment I will ask the children open-ended questions Assessment: I will ask the......

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...speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion). Build on others’ talk in conversations by responding to the comments of others through multiple exchanges. Ask questions to clear up any confusion about the topics and texts under discussion. SL.1.6- Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation. Objective: Given a word a student will be able to use a description wording by demonstrating an understanding of synonyms with 100% accuracy. Purpose: This lesson is to teach students that when telling stories, they cannot use the same word over and over again. When telling a story they can use more descriptive synonyms and many words that we commonly use everyday have synonyms that they can use to replace these overused words. Materials: -White board -“Boring” word magnets -synonym magnets -Word strips -Pencils -Expo Markers Anticipatory Set: Have the entire class come to the floor and sit in front of the teacher. To introduce this lesson I will introduce a scenario where a family goes on a trip and they come back to tell the class about the trip. Each person in the family says, “The trip was so much fun. We had so much fun on our trip. We had fun the whole time.” I will ask the students about how hearing the family say fun over and over make their trip seem uninteresting and make you wish they told you a little bit more? I will then introduce the concept of...

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...CICLO ESCOLAR 2013-2014 |TEACHER: |Objective: By the end of this unit Ss will be able to talk about themselves, their families, and| |GROUP: 5012 WEEK: 0 / 1 |their favorite things using present and past simple of be statements. | |DEVELOPMENT AREAS: ACADEMIC WRITING / READING STRATEGIES/GRAMMAR AND VOCABULARY |Objective: By the end of this unit Ss will be able to talk about themselves, their families, and | | |their favorite things using present and past simple of be statements. | |MATERIAL: Touchstone 3 Student´s Book / Touchstone 3 Workbook | | |MONDAY, AUGUST 12TH |WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14TH |FRIDAY, AUGUST 16TH | |13:20 – 14:10 |Intro: Ice breaker- |12:30 – 13:20 |Class presentation/ Synthesis delivering |12:30 – 13:20 |Diagnostic test......

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