Premium Essay

Life of Saint Ambrose

In: Religion Topics

Submitted By ubermensche24
Words 3628
Pages 15
Saint Ambrose of Milan
Introduction
“Sanctity is development of initial grace which God gives in the first place; it is a process.” The saints are our examples in living our Christian faith into our lives. They lived their lives in conformity with the will of God. These people are also like us who endure the difficulties and challenges of becoming a true authentic disciple of Jesus Christ. “Saints are not born; they’re made from a lifetime of processing in the Spirit.” All of us can become saints they are just ordinary people like us but their faith makes them extraordinary and by practicing and living the teachings of God in their day to day lives. The saints are our models of holiness and virtues into our lives as a pilgrim in this world. They inspire us and we also asked their intercessions in order to strengthen our faith and love to God. In order to follow Christ let us imitate the virtues that we can get from the life stories of the saints who are the living witness of God’s goodness and love.
In this paper, I chose St. Ambrose as the subject of this research. Because when I read his short life story in the book entitled My first Book of Saints by Son of Immaculate Heart of Mary. I was fascinated on his life story on how he lives and serve his life as the Bishop of Milan. St. Ambrose was largely responsible for the rise of Christianity in the West, and he was very courageous and untiring defender of the independence of the Church from the state.
Through this research, I want to know more about him his way of life and his importance in the early History of the Church. Most of the ideas of this research paper are extracted from the books about his life and teachings. 1. Life of St. Ambrose
In this part of the paper, we will go to the life story of St. Ambrose his early life, his life before his election to the episcopacy, how he was elected...

Similar Documents

Free Essay

32erwbqkubrgka

...SAmbrose Saint Blessing and Official Opening of the New Building 8 October 2012 HEAD MASTER’S WELCOME "And if you have faith, everything you ask for in prayer you will receive." - Matthew 21:22 In June of 2006, after six fruitless years of campaigning for new buildings, Saint Ambrose College was selected to become a ‘One School Pathfinder’. This was to be an opportunity for the Local Authority and the College to set up and test a joint approach to educational transformation. The journey took longer than intended, six years instead of the allocated three; the Lord clearly wanted us to spend more time in the design and planning! The Celtic cross was chosen by Blessed Edmund Rice, our founder, to become a symbol of the Congregation of Christian Brothers. It is the cross which appears on the badges of all our schools and colleges. Now it carves out that shape in the Manchester landscape proclaiming our Faith to all. The interior of the building emphasises the religious community which is at the heart of our College. The learning wings provide enhanced teaching and sporting facilities and embrace the IT age like never before. We must always remember that this is not a new College, it is a new building. The College continues to be an amalgam of past and present students and staff whose shared commitment to Edmund Rice Education has made it unique. Edmund would be proud of what we have built but even prouder of how it will transform the lives and......

Words: 2619 - Pages: 11

Free Essay

Saint Ambrose

...SAINT AMBROSE Saint Aurelius Ambrose lived from 330 – 4 April 397. He was the archbishop of Milan and one of the first original four doctors of the church. He was born into a Roman Catholic family. After his fathers untimely death, he decided to follow in his footsteps and study in Rome. He went from only having a small place in the council, to Govenor, and finally Bishop. He went from being a unbaptized layman to bishop in eight days. As bishop, he adopted a self-denying lifestyle he gave his money to the poor and donated all of his land, making only a home for his sister Marcellina. He had total control of the cultural and political life of his age.He stopped Arianism for as long as he could until the Arians became so strong he had only the choice to profess Arianism. He then tried to stop the building of two Arian churches Milan and warned young Christians against intermarriage with Jews. He also led the charge to the persecution of Paganism. Ambrose was the teacher who converted and baptized St. Augustine of Hippo, and was a model bishop who viewed the church as rising above the ruins of the Roman Empire. He composed multiple beautiful hymns. Ambrose’s position was not challenged even after death, he was a model for other bishops to follow. He always protected Christianity from other new methods trying to make their way in, such as the Pagans. He was suceeded by Simplician. His body can still be seen on display in the church of s. ambrogio in Milan, as one of the......

Words: 309 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Christianity in Late Antiquity

...Christianity in Late Antiquity The period of Late Antiquity was roughly between 300 and 600 A.D. It was a period of change for the European world, change in politics, religion, economics, and much more. New ideas and ways were emerging while many of the old were starting to disappear. One of the most important and drastic changes during this time was the change in Christianity. Christianity was present before this period, but during Late Antiquity was when the Christian Church went from a persecuted religion to a desired and dominate faith. In this paper I will argue through the writings of Saint Augustine’s Confessions good Christians in Late Antiquity must be obedient and have a good sense of acceptance. Christianity really started to spread and expand in the third century. When the Roman Empire was declining in the third century Christianity was able to come in and take a place that was felt to be empty by the people. The economy was deteriorating with the decline in agriculture and food, leaving Christian Church to provide care for the poor, making Christianity appealing to the normal person. During the time of catastrophe such as the plague the Church was there to take care of the people; they managed burials for the dead, and during famine they organized food-supplies for the poor. The Church was the only form of a unified organization during times of upheaval making it alluring to people who felt they had been abandoned by the Roman Empire; the Church also gave...

Words: 3114 - Pages: 13

Free Essay

Numerology Through Symbols of Faith

...philosophical, symbol use. “The Pythagoreans made number games philosophically respectable, and the great authority of Plato raised mathematics into theological realms. But at the lowest level, numbers remained magical.” The fall of the Roman Empire, caused a challenging transition for many, especially in terms of religion. From Paganism to Christianity, many had to look for a meaning, and be convinced, or understand, regardless of doubts that a new religion was to emerge. The early years of Christianity revolved around strong thinkers who were able to establish arguments in order to defend a newborn faith. Those strong thinkers, not always referred to as Saints, are known to us as the Fathers of the Church. The three that we will briefly look into in order to stabilize the basis of the argument are: Irenaeus of Lyons, Ambrose of Milan, and Augustine of Hippo. Irenaeus, born in 130AD, was an early Greek Church Father, and...

Words: 2225 - Pages: 9

Free Essay

The Impact of St. Augustine's Life

...The Impact of St. Augustine's Life LIBERTY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY THE IMPACT OF ST. AUGUSTINE’S LIFE A Paper Submitted To Dr. John Landers Liberty Theological Seminary In Partial Fulfillment Of The Requirements For The Course CHHI 520 CHHI-520 HISTORY OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH I By Dutch Nelson Liberty ID #: L24440559 Lynchburg, Virginia October 7, 2012 Table of Contents Cover Page 1 Table of Contents 2 Introduction 3 The Life of Augustine 3 Madaurus 366-370 3 Thagaste 370-371 4 Carthage 371-383 4 Italy 383-387 4 Thagaste 387-390 5 Hippo 390-430 5 Augustine as a Writer 5 Augustine as a Scholar 6 Augustine as a Pagan 7 Augustine and Marriage 8 Augustine’s Journey to Christiainity 9 Augustine as a Christian 10 Augustine as Saint 11 Conclusion 12 Bibliography 14 Introduction Spiritual leaders exemplify themselves by the way they live and the way they impact the lives of others. This normally determines how their congregation and those who hear their word and see their deeds view them. Augustine’s life has not been totally perfect. He like other humans has erred in some way. However, he has had a positive impact on a number of theologians and philosophers (Smith 2008, 1). This paper looks at his life over his 76 years on earth and seeks to provide evidence that Augustine’s life can be used as an example in the preparation of spiritual leaders. The Life of Augustine Augustine’s life dates from 354 to 430.......

Words: 3734 - Pages: 15

Premium Essay

Until I Die (Copy)

...Until I Die ONE I LEAPT, DRAWING MY FEET UP BENEATH ME, AS the seven-foot quarterstaff smashed into the flagstones where I had been standing a half second before. Landing in a crouch, I sprang back up, groaning with the effort, and swung my own weapon over my head. Sweat dripped into my eye, blinding me for one stinging second before my reflexes took over and forced me into motion. A shaft of light from a window far overhead illuminated the oaken staff as I arced it down toward my enemy’s legs. He swept sideways, sending my weapon flying through the air. It crashed with a wooden clang against the stone wall behind me. Defenseless, I scrambled for a sword that lay a few feet away. But before I could grab it, I was snatched off my feet in a powerful grasp and crushed against my assailant’s chest. He held me a few inches off the ground as I kicked and flailed, adrenaline pumping like quicksilver through my body. “Don’t be such a sore loser, Kate,” chided Vincent. Leaning forward, he gave me a firm kiss on the lips. The fact that he was shirtless was quickly eroding my hard-won concentration. And the warmth from his bare chest and arms was turning my fight-tensed muscles to buttery goo. Struggling to maintain my resolve, I growled, “That is totally cheating,” and managed to work my hand free enough to punch him in the arm. “Now let me go.” “If you promise not to kick or bite.” He laughed and set me on the ground. Sea blue eyes flashed with humor from under the waves of......

Words: 86302 - Pages: 346

Premium Essay

Re Essay on Religions

...RE: Poverty "Poverty is defined relative to the standards of living in a society at a specific time. People live in poverty when they are denied an income sufficient for their material needs and when these circumstances exclude them from taking part in activities which are an accepted part of daily life in that society." Scottish Poverty Information Unit. The most commonly used way to measure poverty is based on incomes. A person is considered poor if his or her income level falls below some minimum level necessary to meet basic needs. This minimum level is usually called the "poverty line". What is necessary to satisfy basic needs varies across time and societies. Therefore, poverty lines vary in time and place, and each country uses lines which are appropriate to its level of development, societal norms and values." The World Bank Organisations. These are just a few of the different definitions of poverty from different views. The general definition is ‘the state of being extremely poor’ and/or ‘the state of being inferior in quality or insufficient in amount’. Absolute poverty is defined as the lack of sufficient resources with which to meet basic needs. Relative poverty defines income or resources in relation to the average. At least 80% of humanity lives on less than $10 a day. More than 80 percent of the world’s population lives in countries where income differentials are widening. The poorest 40 percent of the world’s population accounts for 5 percent of global......

Words: 1411 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Re Charities

...RE: Poverty "Poverty is defined relative to the standards of living in a society at a specific time. People live in poverty when they are denied an income sufficient for their material needs and when these circumstances exclude them from taking part in activities which are an accepted part of daily life in that society." Scottish Poverty Information Unit. The most commonly used way to measure poverty is based on incomes. A person is considered poor if his or her income level falls below some minimum level necessary to meet basic needs. This minimum level is usually called the "poverty line". What is necessary to satisfy basic needs varies across time and societies. Therefore, poverty lines vary in time and place, and each country uses lines which are appropriate to its level of development, societal norms and values." The World Bank Organisations. These are just a few of the different definitions of poverty from different views. The general definition is ‘the state of being extremely poor’ and/or ‘the state of being inferior in quality or insufficient in amount’. Absolute poverty is defined as the lack of sufficient resources with which to meet basic needs. Relative poverty defines income or resources in relation to the average. At least 80% of humanity lives on less than $10 a day. More than 80 percent of the world’s population lives in countries where income differentials are widening. The poorest 40 percent of the world’s population accounts for 5 percent of global......

Words: 1411 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Life After Death

...within different denominations of the same religion. The question of life after death has perplexed man through the ages. In the Bible Job famously asked “if a man die, shall he live again?” (Job 14:14). The notion of resurrection is central to Christian faith, it is the belief that Jesus returned to life on the Sunday following the Friday of his crucifixion. In Matthew 28 an angel says to the Virgin Mary and Mary Magdalene; “do not be afraid; for I know that you seek Jesus who was crucified. He is not here; for he has risen, as he said.” It is from the resurrection of Jesus that the Christian belief in life after death emerges. In John 11:25-26 Jesus said “I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in me will live, even though he dies.” This led to the belief that if one is to follow the teachings of Jesus and accept him as their lord and saviour; one can then look forward to the afterlife. N.T Wright, in his book Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church states that “Jesus’ resurrection is the beginning of God’s new project, not to snatch people away from earth to heaven but to colonize earth with the life of heaven.” This literal view of resurrection in similar to the Hindu belief in reincarnation. In John 3:16 it was said “for God so loved the world that he gave his one and only son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.” This raises the question of the form of the afterlife;......

Words: 2372 - Pages: 10

Free Essay

Investigatory Project

... Lagac, Ma. Jeremay Arjen T. Emalay, Gabrianne B. Molinyawe, Shaira Enriquez, Edward D. Rabanal, Joan Marie Enriquez, Jazzmin O Uy, Joachim Rey B. January 2014 Chapter I THE PROBLEM AND ITS SETTING Introduction Behavior is one of the most important aspects for all students to be not just good on their academic performance but also for other people’s perception to them like their teachers, administrators and also their principal. Different students have different behaviors based on their experience, status and their vision in life. Because of these aspects, student behavior can be affected whether positively or negatively. Academic performance will surely be affected because of different factors revolving around the student. As an effect, students with good behavior and good study habits will certainly excel on their academic performance while students with poor behavior and poor study habits might likely fail on their academic performance status. However, good behavior will not always lead to a good academic performance. It is cited on the research that even students with good behavior tend to have poor academic performance. Thus, proposes that such behavior must directly be linked to the improvement of students’ academic performance. Behavior is a......

Words: 5991 - Pages: 24

Premium Essay

Religion

...Pentecostalism * One way in which this religion spread begins with an independent bible school in Topeka, Kansas, founded by Charles Fox Parham (1873-1929) * Some students there had a particular concern for the account in the Christian New Testament recorded in the book of Acts, chapter two, describing what happened to Jesus’ disciples as they gathered in a private room in Jerusalem during the Jewish festival of Pentecost. * This festival attracted thousands of tourists who spoke many different languages. According to the account, the Holy Spirit enabled the disciples to speak in these different languages. This phenomenon is called “speaking in tongues” or glossolalia. Those who spoke in different languages believed the Holy Spirit granted them the gift or power to do so. Much of the Christian tradition restricted such miraculous gifts to the age of the apostles and did not expect them later. * Parham’s students in Topeka found nothing in the biblical text that limited such spiritual gifts to an ancient time. On New Year’s Day, 1901, Agnes Ozman received the gift of speaking in tongues. Parham soon embraced the idea, equating such spiritual gifts with a “second baptism” that followed the traditional baptism which used water to anoint individuals. This second baptism was a baptism of fire * Speaking in tongues is a form of ecstatic experience when for a time another power seized control of one and manifests itself. * The Pentecostal...

Words: 6697 - Pages: 27

Free Essay

The Youth and the Church

...Youth & and the future of the Church The question of how to attract and keep our young people close to the Church is one of major concern in our troubled age. To remain indifferent to this problem can only be regarded as a grave sin and is an indication of soul-destroying self-love. The proposed solutions to this problem are many and varied, but unfortunately most succumb to the easy allure of gimmicks, i.e. the attempt to use methods popular in our fallen society, but sadly distant from the true aim of our salvation. Among these we find an exaggerated call to social action, distraction through social activities, appeals to the intellect, and outright distortions of the Gospel message to accommodate each individual appetite. Let us briefly examine each of these methods, beginning with the call to social action. This approach plays upon what are basically positive and as surely Christian virtues such as mercy, loving-kindness and brotherly concern. Apostles of social action exaggerate the human aspect of Christ's message, stressing it over and above all other considerations. Thus, the primary functions of our Lord's Incarnation are understood to be feeding the hungry, clothing the naked, healing the sick, etc. Far different is the Orthodox concept which recognizes as above all these things the "freedom from the slavery of sin" wrought by the Passion, Death, and Resurrection of our Savior. Therein lies the fullness and the perfection of love. However, to belittle the......

Words: 6740 - Pages: 27

Premium Essay

Christmas

...Christmas Christmas | A depiction of the Nativity with a Christmas tree backdrop. | Also called | Noel Nativity Yule Xmas | Observed by | Christians Many non-Christians[1] | Type | Christian, cultural | Significance | Traditional birthday of Jesus | Date | December 25 (alternatively, January 6, 7 or 19) | Observances | Church services, gift giving, family and other social gatherings, symbolic decorating | Related to | Christmastide, Christmas Eve, Advent, Annunciation, Epiphany, Baptism of the Lord, Yule | Christmas is an annual commemoration of the birth of Jesus Christ, celebrated generally on December 25 as a religious and cultural holiday by billions of people around the world. A feast central to the Christian liturgical year, it closes the Advent season and initiates the twelve days of Christmastide. Christmas is a civil holiday in many of the world's nations, is celebrated by an increasing number of non-Christians, and is an integral part of the Christmas and holiday season. The precise date of Jesus' birth, which some historians place between 7 and 2 BC, is unknown. By the early-to-mid 4th century, the Western Christian Church had placed Christmas on December 25, a date later adopted in the East. The date of Christmas may have initially been chosen to correspond with the day exactly nine months after early Christians believed Jesus to have been conceived, as well as the date of the southern solstice (i.e., the Roman winter solstice), with a...

Words: 9183 - Pages: 37

Premium Essay

Reformed Apologetics Ministries

...Reformed Apologetics Ministries Monday, March 17, 2014 Historical Examination of Roman Catholic Eucharist Theology Rome claims her view is historical. We will now examine if the early church writers taught transubstantiation of the bread and wine as well as the Mass being seen as an expiatory and propitiatory sacrifice. Rome has erroneously claimed her modern view has always been held by the historic church. At the Council of Trent Rome taught her belief was affirmed by “all our forefathers” (Thirteenth Session, Chapter 1, The Canons and Decrees of the Council of Trent, trans. H. J. Schroeder, [TAN Books and Publishers, 1978], p. 73), that is, church fathers. Trent also claimed, “because that Christ, our Redeemer, declared that which He offered under the species of bread to be truly His own body, therefore has it ever been a firm belief in the Church of God” (Thirteen Session, Chapter 4, The Canons and Decrees of the Council of Trent, trans. H. J. Schroeder, [TAN Books and Publishers, 1978], p. 75). We will therefore test Rome’s claims historically. Rome’s idea ahistorical & based on Aristotelian concepts adopted late by the church. Rome’s doctrine of transubstantiation is dependent on the pagan Aristotle’s philosophical idea of accidents and substance. Modern Rome’s specific view as espoused by the Fourth Lateran Council and the Council of Trent, as well as other papal documents, that the substance of the elements change into the body and blood of Christ, while the......

Words: 9876 - Pages: 40

Premium Essay

Catechism

...CATHOLIC CHURCH Table of Contents PROLOGUE I. The life of man - to know and love God nn. 1-3 II. Handing on the Faith: Catechesis nn. 4-10 III. The Aim and Intended Readership of the Catechism nn. 11-12 IV. Structure of this Catechism nn. 13-17 V. Practical Directions for Using this Catechism nn. 18-22 VI. Necessary Adaptations nn. 23-25 PART ONE: THE PROFESSION OF FAITH SECTION ONE "I BELIEVE" - "WE BELIEVE" n. 26 CHAPTER ONE MAN'S CAPACITY FOR GOD nn. 27-49 I. The Desire for God nn. 27-30 II. Ways of Coming to Know God nn. 31-35 III. The Knowledge of God According to the Church nn. 36-38 IV. How Can We Speak about God? nn.39-43 IN BRIEF nn. 44-49 CHAPTER TWO GOD COMES TO MEET MAN n. 50 Article 1 THE REVELATION OF GOD I. God Reveals His "Plan of Loving Goodness" nn. 51-53 II. The Stages of Revelation nn. 54-64 III. Christ Jesus -- "Mediator and Fullness of All Revelation" nn. 6567 IN BRIEF nn. 68-73 Article 2 THE TRANSMISSION OF DIVINE REVELATION n. 74 I. The Apostolic Tradition nn.75-79 II. The Relationship Between Tradition and Sacred Scripture nn. 80-83 III. The Interpretation of the Heritage of Faith nn. 84-95 IN BRIEF nn. 96-100 Article 3 SACRED SCRIPTURE I. Christ - The Unique Word of Sacred Scripture nn. 101-104 II. Inspiration and Truth of Sacred Scripture nn. 105-108 III. The Holy Spirit, Interpreter of Scripture nn. 109-119 IV. The Canon of Scripture nn. 120-130 V. Sacred Scripture in the Life of the Church nn. 131-133 IN BRIEF nn.......

Words: 141872 - Pages: 568