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Light on a Plane Mirror

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The angle of incidence compares with the angle of reflection by always sharing the exact same measurement. For each trial performed, the incident ray would be directed towards the mirror and the reflected ray would match the incidence ray but would reflect the other way. For example, when trial 1 was performed and the angle of incidence was aimed on the plane mirror, its angle equaled 45°. The angle reflected off the mirror in the same angle which also equaled 45°. This reflection came off a smooth surface which was a flat mirror. This reflection is known as a specular reflection.
b) In trial 5, when the incident ray was aimed along the normal, the incident ray and the reflective ray overlapped each other. They shared the same measurement of 0°. This happened because since the incident ray was aimed straight along the normal, the ray reflected off from the reflection and turned back which resulted in overlapping the angle of incidence. Also, since the angle of incidence measured 0°, which is the measurement the angle of reflection has to have according to the law of reflection. Since it is a straight line, then the reflection (which is the ray of reflection) much share the same measurement and copy the angle, which in this case happens to be a straight line.
c) An error that may have occurred in this experiment is if the mirror was moved at all during the time that the experiment was performed. Also, if the centre of the mirror does not line up with the normal, it could cause errors.
d) This error could affect the measurements and could lead to the angle of incidence not equaling the angle of reflection. For example, when trial 1 was performed, the angle of incidence was measured and the result was...

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