Literacy Narrative

In: English and Literature

Submitted By myjay
Words 1146
Pages 5
Decoding the Alphabet
Letter after letter, together in different combinations, large and small, individually they are just the alphabet. However, these letters in different combinations are a mystery to me. I’m just wishing I had a decoder ring like orphan Annie did, or an enigma, maybe that way I could decipher the secret of this hidden message that is before me. All I can see is groups of letters; an alphabet soup of sorts. This is the way I felt while in the first grade. The teacher had set a progress report on my table that was to be handed to my parents.
I ran all the way home exited and impatient. I don’t even remember looking both ways when crossing streets along the way. I just wanted to get home as fast as I could. As soon as I arrived, I just flung the door open and ran into the house searching for my mother. I found her in the laundry room folding clothes that she had just finished ironing. At home, my family always spoke Spanish, English was hardly if ever used. So I practically threw the progress card toward her.
“Mama mira lo que me dio la profesora para ti!”
My mother took the card and looked at it. Then she flipped it over and looked at it again. She had a puzzled look on her face as she turned it back to the front. I just looked up at her with big round eyes waiting for an explanation as to the secret that it held.
“Que es lo que dice?”
“Se lo daremos a tu padre cuando llege.”
“Pero que dice?”
“Tendras que esperarte.”
Great, why won’t she tell me, what the big secret is? I will have to wait for my dad to get done playing G.I. Joe. That is what he called being in the Army. The grandfather clock in the corner of the room just ticked and seemed like the hands would barely move. I could not tell time with that clock, but I knew that while mom was making dinner, my father could walk in at any moment. As I was washing my hands before…...

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