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Senior School Prospectus 2014

Yr 10/VCE/VCAL/VET

2013 College Captains

[pic]

Madeline Hallett, Jake Thomas, Arnela Dug, Elias Joseph

Contents

|Contact Details |Page 3 |
|Glossary of Terms |Page 4 |
|Key Dates |Page 5 |
|Year 10 overview |Pages 6 -10 |
|Core Unit Descriptions |11 -30 |
|Vocational Pathway Course Overview |31 - 32 |
|Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE) Overview |33 - 37 |
|Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE) Subjects |38 - 66 |
|Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL) Overview |67 |
|Vocational Education and Training in Schools Program (VETis) |68 |
|Vocational Education and Training in Schools Program (VETis) Course Descriptions |69 - 74 |
|Appendix (Course Selection Forms) |75 - 88 |

YR 10/VCE/VCAL/VET PROSPECTUS

2014

Contact Details

Principal Bronwyn Hamilton

Assistant Principal Linda Stanton

Assistant Principal Rhonda Potter

Assistant Principal Rosanna Spina

Senior Sub-School Leader Bobbie Peters

Middle Sub-School Leader Natasha Tzilantonis

Yr 12 Coordinator Helen Leventakis

Yr 11 Coordinator Kate Whittaker

Yr 10 Coordinator Erin Carter

VCAL Coordinator Sally Ross

Careers Coordinator Tony Sheahan

Browns Road
Noble Park Nth. 3174
Ph. 97955848
Fax. 97901712 carwatha.p12@edumail.vic.gov.au

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

COURSEWORK ASSESSMENT: The assessment of work, done mainly in class time, to establish how students are performing in Units 3 and 4. It must conform to the Study Design. Can be School Assessed Coursework (SAC) or School Assessed Tasks (SAT).

ATAR: The Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank - Derived from SAC/SAT scores in Units 3 and 4 to rank students in order of merit for tertiary selection. Students need to apply for tertiary selection to be ranked.

GAT: General Achievement Test - Consists of a test held in June. All students undertaking studies at units 3/4 sit the GAT. The GAT result is used for statistical purposes only and the confidential result is reported to students in December.

GRADED ACTIVITIES: School Assessment
Coursework and School Assessed Tasks. (Refer below).

LEARNING OUTCOMES: What students must know, or be able to do, by the time they have finished a unit.

OUTCOMES: refer to Learning Outcomes

SATISFACTORY COMPLETION OF A UNIT:
Satisfactory completion of all units of study will be based on completion of all the outcomes prescribed for the unit of study. Where illness or other factors affect performance, students may seek Special Provision.

SCHOOL ASSESSED COURSEWORK (SAC): A task done in school to assess how students are performing in Units 3 and 4, set and marked by teachers according to Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority specifications.

SCHOOL ASSESSED TASK (SAT): A model done in school to assess how students are performing in Units 3 and 4, set and marked by teachers according to Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority specifications.
Applies only to Art, Studio Arts, Visual Communication and Design, Design and Technology - Wood, Textiles and Food Technology.
SEMESTER: Equivalent to half a school year or two terms.

UNITS 1 and 2: Units within a VCE study designed to approximate the Year 11 level of difficulty.

UNITS 3 and 4: Units within a VCE study designed to approximate the Year 12 level of difficulty.

SEQUENCE OF UNITS: Most studies have been designed as a sequence of four units, to be taken in each semester over two years.

STUDENT PROGRAMS: A student program is the overall program of studies undertaken by a student during the two year VCE. Programs will normally include 22 units taken over four semesters.

STUDY: A sequence of half year units in a particular area, for example; English, Mathematics, Spanish. Over 40 studies have been developed for the VCE.

STUDY SCORE: The aggregate score given out of 50 for the school assessments and examinations in Unit 3/4 sequences. They are used to derive the ENTER.

STUDY DESIGN: Describes the units available within the study and prescribes the objectives, areas of study, work requirements and assessment tasks.

UNIT: A semester length component of a study.

VET: Vocational Education and Training - A program in which students complete TAFE subjects (modules) as part of their VCE.

VCAA: Victorian Curriculum and Assessment

Authority - responsible for curriculum, assessment and certification Years 11 and 12.

VTAC: Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre - administers a joint selection system on behalf of tertiary institutions.

VCAL: Victorian Certificate Applied Learning

VCE: Victorian Certificate of Education

|Key Dates |

|Day/Date |Event |Time Frame |Venue |
|Tuesday 13th August 2013 |Yr 9 and Yr 10 Parent Information/Subject Expo |7.00-9.00pm |Yr 9 students and parents in FLC |
| |Evening | |Yr 10 students and parents in the Theatre |
| | | |Yr 9-10 families visit the Expo in the Gym (tea and |
| | | |coffee supplied) |
|Thursday 29th August 2013 |Yr 9-10 Course counselling and subject |All day |D1 |
| |submission | | |
| |(Students currently in Year 9) | | |
|Tuesday 3rd September 2013|Yr 10-11 Course interviews with parents |All day |V Block |
| |(Students currently in Year 10) | | |
|Friday 13th September 2013 |Yr 11-12 subject submission |Pd. 1 & 2 |V1 |
| |(Students currently in Year 11) | | |
|25th to 29th November 2013|Yr 10-11 & Yr 11-12 Orientation Week |All Week |Classrooms around the school |

YEAR TEN

Welcome to Year Ten at Carwatha College P-12. At Year Ten many students start to seriously consider their future and begin making decisions which will have a direct impact on their senior studies and ultimately their career paths.

As you enter into this next phase of your school life, you will be expected to take greater responsibility for your own learning. This starts now as you consider elective subject selections to make up your course of study for next year. The elective offerings will provide opportunities for you to explore areas of interest, and possibly provide some background for subject selection in later years. It is for these reasons you must make wise choices, based on carefully considered information and advice from adults who are looking after your best interests. Do not for example, choose subjects purely on the basis that your friends have chosen them – apart from the risk of not enjoying the work or not succeeding in those subjects, there is no guarantee that you will be placed in the same classes anyway. It is important you take every opportunity to talk over your choices with your parents, teachers and coordinators who want to advise and support you through this process.

We look forward to working with all students next year and firmly believe that the partnership of family and the College will allow all students to reach their full potential, both academically and as individuals, and be responsible members of society

YEAR 10 COURSE

Students going into Year Ten have a wider choice of subjects to choose from than they did in Year 7-9. Students also have a choice of two courses of study:

1) Year 10 (building on skills and knowledge in all learning areas)

2) Year 10 Vocational Pathways (focusing on work application and life skills)

Year 10

All subjects will be taught for 8 x 75 minute periods per fortnight

All students will study the following core subjects:

English

Mathematics

Students will then select 6 elective units (3 each semester) including at least one from each of The Arts/Technology, Humanities, PE/Health and Science. These subject groupings ensure that students retain a breadth of study and thus keep their options open.

Once students have chosen one unit in each of the four Learning Areas, they then have two free elective choices from any of the Learning Areas or from the additional elective units.

Students approved to enrol in a VCE subject may count the VCE units as required Learning Area units or as ‘Free Choice’ electives. Please read the policy concerning VCE subject enrolment and application document.

VCE subjects will normally be studied for a whole year (2 units).

|Year 10 Subjects Offered At Carwatha College P-12 |
|Core Units |Elective Units |
|English |Materials Design and Technology |
|English as an Additional Language |Metal/Plastics |
|Foundation English |Timber |
|Mathematics |Humanities |
|Core Mathematics |Commerce |
|Extension Mathematics |Legal Education |
|Everyday Mathematics |Geography Units |
|Elective Units |Earth Challenge |
|Arts |Expanding Cities |
|Art |History Units |
|Ceramics |American History |
|Drama |War and Peace |
|Graphics/Design |Physical Education and Health |
|Media Studies |PE A (Improving Performance) |
|Music |PE B (Developing A Training Program) |
|Technology |PE/Health |
|Baking and Cake Decoration |PE/Health for Boys |
|Cooking and Eating for Health |Science |
|Multicultural Food |Understanding Science |
|Information Technology |Science Applications |
|Programming in Visual Basic |Additional Elective |
|Computer Applications |Work Education |
| |Personal Development Skills |
| |Psychology |
| |Dance |

Year 10 Vocational Pathways
Vocational Pathways is a practically based program that will cater for students who enjoy hands on learning, are motivated and reliable. It is appropriate for students who plan to undertake a VCAL (Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning) course or obtain an apprenticeship or for those students who may be seeking work in the near future. Students in this course will be required to complete TAFE tasters, work experience, course expos and excursions.

Students will undertake the following subject selections:

(1 unit is for 1 semester)

Foundation English 2 units

Everyday Maths 2 units

Work Education 1 unit

Personal development skills 1 unit

‘Free Choice’ 4 Units (from Year 10 electives)

Units for the Year 10

All subjects will be 8 x 75minute periods a fortnight.

The approximate cost for the 6 week TAFE Taster experience is $200. $50 must be paid as a deposit on the 30th August when students have their course confirmation interview. Full payment of the course needs to be paid by the 1st December. If you are facing financial difficulties and cannot pay the deposit immediately, please make an appointment with the Student Wellbeing Co-ordinator, to discuss possible alternative arrangements.

Courses on offer are likely to be:

*Hair and Beauty,

*Electrical and Electrotechnology,

*Aquaculture, and Engineering Technology,

* Engineering Manufacturing,

*Carpentry,

*Plumbing Trades

It is a possibility for students to complete a VETis course at year 10. However this is a case by case basis. Please speak to your SSL, Mr Knight if you are interested.

The second semester requires students to complete work placement one day a week. This placement is the student’s responsibility to organise during Term 1 and 2, 2013. During Work Education classes students will be completing the relevant work experience certificates.

Please be aware that there will be extra costs required for this course to cover excursions and other excursions.

How will you be assessed in Vocational Pathways?

Satisfactory completion will be based on completion of all Learning Outcomes in their subject/unit and successful completion of their TAFE enrolment and Work Placement

COURSE SELECTION PROCESS

Communication from parents and students is welcomed and encouraged by the Year Level Coordinator and classroom teachers. If there are any difficulties, please contact the Year 10 Coordinator, Mrs Peters, the Years 9 and 10 Sub-School Leader, Mrs Knight or Ms Apollonio, the Education Leader for Years 10 to 12.

What to consider when selecting a course

To select a course that best suits your needs, it is important that you:

(a) Read carefully the information about the structure of a Year 10 course. Once you have done this, carefully read the information about each elective choice;

(b) Seek further information from the Years 9 and 10 Sub-School Leader, Year Level Coordinator or classroom teachers if unsure;

(c) Seek advice from the Pathways Team, if you have a particular career or tertiary course in mind. Find out what subjects and educational standard are required;

(d) Choose elective units which support your career goals. If you are unsure about your future directions, focus on maximising your options;

(e) Try to select subjects which highlight your strengths;

(f) Choose subjects on the basis of interest, skill or need, not to remain with a particular friendship group or in terms of whether you like or dislike a teacher;

(g) If you are an outstanding student who meets the criteria set in the policy, consider enrolling in a VCE unit; discuss this option with your parents, teachers and co-ordinators.

Fill out the Course Selection Form and submit it on Thursday 30th August during your Course Counselling Interview. (Hint: use pencil first)

VCE units for year 10 students in 2013

All students are offered the opportunity to apply to study a VCE subject in Year 10, however enrolment will only be approved if the eligibility requirements are met.

In 2013, all Unit 1 and 2 subjects are available to Year 10 students, with the exception of English Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry. A full list of Unit 1 & 2 subjects offered to Year 10 students at Carwatha College P -12, 2013 are also on this CD.

All VCE subjects are studied over a full year: Unit 1 in Semester 1 and Unit 2 in Semester 2.

Please refer to the policy regarding the completion of VCE Subjects in Year 10 and the application for Completion of a VCE Subject.) also on this CD)

LEVIES

Please note: This is included as a guide for parents – charges may or may not change in 2013.

In 2012, the Year 10 charges were as follows:

Materials and Services Charges

Voluntary Contributions The Year 10 program is designed to provide students with a maximum choice of elective subjects, complemented by a base core including English and Maths. Each of the elective subjects use extensive classroom materials and class sets of texts, and these subject costs are largely included in the voluntary levy component. These are charges which need to be paid for students to access necessary materials and services such as the planner and locker.

Charges Associated with Specialised Units/Activities

Some units use extensive or expensive class materials, which can’t be included in the above charges as it is unfair on parents if their son/daughter doesn’t undertake these units.

Food Technology Units

Students taking these units will be required to pay per unit to supplement the cost of ingredients. There will be the opportunity to pay in full for the semester or in 2 payments, one for each Term.

On occasion, where a student undertakes a large project with high cost materials, parents will be required to supply the materials or contribute toward the cost.

In addition to the above, some units may have charges for excursions.

|CORE UNIT DESCRIPTIONS |

English

This course is designed to consolidate and further develop the students’ English language skills.
The main components of the course are Speaking and Listening, Reading, and Writing.

Course Aims and Objectives

The aims of this course are:

1. To develop students’ language skills for speaking and listening, reading and writing. 2. To foster an appreciation of literature 3. To develop a critical analysis of texts, including novels, films, short stories and current media texts

Homework: 2.5 hours per week approximately, not including regular reading of a wide range of texts.

Assessment Tasks

• Text response • Oral presentation • Analysis of persuasive language • Writing: personal, argumentative, informative, instructional, imaginative, descriptive • Exam

VCE units for which this unit will provide a helpful background

• English units 1 – 4, • Literature units 1 – 4, • Foundation English units 1 – 2.

English as an Additional Language

This course is designed for students from non-English speaking backgrounds. They may be students who have recently arrived in Australia or students who do not speak English at home and consequently need assistance in further development of their English skills.

The course aims to develop students’ competence in the understanding and use of English in order to facilitate their readiness for the rigours of VCE English/EAL

Course Aims and Objectives

The aims of this course are:

1. To develop students’ language skills for, speaking and listening, reading and writing.
2. To further develop students’ ability to understand and analyse a variety of texts

Homework: 2.5 hours per week approximately, not including regular reading of a wide range of texts.

Assessment Tasks

• Text response • Oral presentation • Analysis of persuasive language • Writing: personal, argumentative, informative, instructional, imaginative, descriptive • Exam

VCE units for which this unit will provide a helpful background

• English units 1 – 4 • E.S.L. 1 – 4, • Literature units 1 – 4,
Foundation English units 1 – 2

The Foundation English course is designed for students who need additional assistance to strengthen and refine their literacy skills in order to be better prepared for VCE English courses. The course will draw on and strengthen the knowledge and skills students have acquired about texts and language in previous English studies. Student selection for this course will be subject to consultation during the counselling process.

Course Aims and Objectives

The aims of this course are:

1. To develop students’ language skills for, speaking and listening, reading and writing. 2. To further develop students’ ability to understand and analyse a variety of texts

Homework: 2.5 hours per week approximately, not including regular reading of a wide range of texts.

Assessment Tasks

• Text response • Oral presentation • Analysis of persuasive language • Writing: personal, argumentative, informative, instructional, imaginative, descriptive • Exam
VCE units for which this unit will provide a helpful background

• English units 1 – 4, • Literature units 1 – 4, • Foundation English units 1 – 2.

Mathematics

Three Mathematics courses are offered:

• Core Mathematics • Extension Mathematics • Everyday Mathematics

The choice between these three courses will be dependent upon the following factors:

• The student's intentions regarding Year 11 and Year 12 Mathematics • Future employment aspirations • Demonstrated mathematical ability

Core Mathematics

This course is for students intending to study any Year 11 Mathematics which leads on to Year 12 Mathematics or for students unsure about how much Mathematics to do in future.

A good grade in this course will be needed before attempting the Year 11 courses Mathematical Methods CAS 1 & 2 and General Mathematics Advanced 1 & 2. These courses lead on to the Year 12 courses Mathematical Methods CAS 3 & 4, Specialist Mathematics 3 & 4 and Further Mathematics 3 & 4.

Note: Students who plan to study Specialist Maths 3 & 4 are encouraged to study both Maths Methods CAS 1 & 2 and General Maths Advanced 1 & 2.

The following topics are covered in Year 10 - Core Mathematics: Problem Solving; Algebra; Indices and Surds; Probability; Trigonometry; Surface Area and Volume; Geometry; Statistics and the Interpretation of Data; Polynomials; Ratio; Variation.

Course Aims

To enable students to:

• Develop mathematical knowledge and skills; • Develop the mathematical knowledge and skills necessary to be successful at VCE Mathematics subjects and beyond; • Apply mathematical knowledge to analyse, investigate and solve problems in a variety of situations, ranging from well-defined and familiar situations to unfamiliar and open-ended situations.

Course Objectives

To enable students to: 1. Develop their knowledge and skills of the main areas of Mathematics (Number & Algebra, Measurement & Geometry; Statistics & Probability); 2. Apply their knowledge and skills in these areas of study to analyse, investigate and solve problems in a variety of situations; 3. Experience a range of classroom activities and have a variety of mathematical experiences; 4. Communicate their mathematical ideas; 5. Make effective use of computers and calculators in relation to the areas of this unit.

Homework: MINIMUM amount would be about 2 - 3 hours per week.

Assessment Tasks

1. Examination 2. Tests 3. Assignments and Projects

VCE units for which this subject is a prerequisite: • Maths Methods CAS (1 and 2) • General Maths (Advanced) • General Maths (Further)

Extension Mathematics

This Mathematics class involves extension and accelerated Year 10 Mathematics work.

Students will be challenged and given work that meets their individual Mathematics needs.

Who should choose this?

• Students who performed very well in years 7 – 9 Mathematics; • Students who like and excel at Mathematics.

Note: Entry into this class is dependent upon approval from the Years 9 and 10 Sub-School Leader, Co-ordinators and relevant class teachers

Course Aims

To enable students to:

• Develop Mathematical knowledge and skills beyond AusVELS Level 10, that will offer an excellent preparation for success in VCE Mathematics; • Apply themselves to problem solving and mathematical concepts which will foster a deeper mathematical appreciation.

Course Objectives

To enable students to: 1. Develop their knowledge and skills of the main areas of Mathematics (Number & Algebra, Measurement & Geometry; Statistics & Probability); 2. Apply their knowledge and skills in these areas of study to analyse, investigate and solve problems in a variety of situations; 3. Experience a range of classroom activities and have a variety of mathematical experiences; 4. Communicate their mathematical ideas; 5. Make effective use of computers and calculators in relation to the areas of this unit.

Homework:

MINIMUM amount would be about 2 - 3 hours per week.

Assessment Tasks

1. Examination 2. Tests 3. Assignments and Projects
Everyday Mathematics

Course Content

The course is a selection of topics chosen from time, topology, number, money, algebra, statistics, coordinates and graphs, percentages, measurement, ratio and proportion, probability and consumer mathematics.

NOTE: Everyday Mathematics leads to Year 11 foundation Maths 1 and 2. Year 11 Foundation Maths DOES NOT lead to Year 12 Maths course.

Course Aims

To enable students to:

• Develop mathematical knowledge and skills required to solve problems likely to be encountered in domestic, industrial and business situations;

• Apply mathematical knowledge to analyse, investigate and solve problems in a variety of situations, ranging from well-defined and familiar situations to unfamiliar and open-ended situations

Course Objectives

To enable students to: 1. Develop their knowledge and skills in the areas of Basic Skills, Managing Money, Applied Mathematics and Geometry; 2. Apply their knowledge and skills in these areas of study to analyse, investigate and solve problems in a variety of situations; 3. Experience a range of classroom activities and have a variety of mathematical experiences; 4. Communicate their mathematical ideas; 5. Make effective use of computers and calculators in relation to the areas of this unit.

Homework: MINIMUM amount is 2 - 3 hours per week.

Assessment Tasks 1. Examination 2. Tests 3. Assignments and Projects

SUMMARY OF WHERE MATHEMATICS COURSES LEAD

|If you study this Mathematics in Year 10 |These are the Mathematics Units available for you to choose from in |
| |Year 11 |
|Extension Mathematics |General Mathematics Advance |
| |Mathematical Methods CAS |
| |General Mathematics Further |
| |Foundation Mathematics |
| |VCAL Numeracy |
|Core Mathematics |General Mathematics Advance |
| |Mathematical Methods CAS |
| |General Mathematics Further |
| |Foundation Mathematics |
| |VCAL Numeracy |
|Everyday Mathematics |Foundation Mathematics |
| |VCAL Numeracy |

|If you study this Mathematics in Year 11 |These are the Mathematics Units available for you to choose from in |
| |Year 12 |
|General Mathematics Advanced AND Mathematical Methods CAS |Specialist Mathematics |
| |Mathematical Methods |
| |Further Mathematics |
|Mathematical Methods |Mathematical Methods |
| |Further Mathematics |
|General Mathematics Further |Further Mathematics |
|Foundation Mathematics |VCAL Numeracy |
|VCAL Numeracy |VCAL Numeracy |

Note:

1. Students studying General Mathematics Advanced in Year 11 must also study Mathematical Methods CAS in Year 11 2. Students studying Specialist Mathematics in Year 12 must also study Mathematical Methods in Year 12 3. To study Specialist Mathematics in Year 12 students are required to have completed General Mathematics Advanced and Mathematical Methods CAS in Year 11

|ELECTIVE UNIT DESCRIPTIONS |

The Arts

Art

Course Description

This course develops your technical skills in a range of areas, such as painting, drawing, printmaking and sculpture. You will be encouraged to explore these avenues through set tasks and make your own personal statements about your world and experiences. You will learn how to analyse other artists’ work looking at their aims, approaches to subject matter, techniques and style.

Course Aims and Objectives

At the end of this unit students should be able to:

1. Create artworks which express their experiences and feelings about the world around them; 2. Present art works appropriately; 3. Investigate different art styles and cultures to gain inspiration for artworks; 4. Analyse other artists’ work and talk about art works.

Homework: MINIMUM 1 hour per week - some practical and some theory work.

Assessment Tasks • Practical folio • Design Development • Assignment/Theory • Examination.

VCE units for which this unit will provide a helpful background

• Studio Arts Units 1 – 4
• Visual Communication Units 1 – 4

Ceramics

Course Description

Do you want to produce your own ceramics? This unit involves you developing ideas for three-dimensional forms. The course works around three types of hand skills - coil, slab, pinch. You will be given a design guideline that will require research, the development of sketches and the production of the final pieces. Your work will use techniques in glazing and other decorative forms.

Objectives

1. To develop skills with hand building, and decorating. 2. To use the design process in developing artwork. 3. To encourage and develop creativity. 4. To provide students with knowledge of artists working in the field.

Homework: MINIMUM 1 hour per week. Students are advised to take every opportunity to make rough sketches for their folios.

Assessment Tasks:

• Design Development • Practical Folio • Assignment/Theory • Examination

VCE units for which this unit will provide a helpful background

• Art and Studio Arts Units 1 – 4

Drama

Course Description

Drama in the first semester will focus on the craft of acting, presenting a character from scratch and rehearsing that character in both solo and group formats.

Course Aims and Objectives

Year 10 drama is concerned with two facets- the ability to make and present drama combined with the ability to analyse and interpret drama. Students will be involved in forming characters in a solo performance and forming characters within a group performance. Students will also learn how to construct and deconstruct a play and the processes behind this. Great actors will be studied from a variety of films and texts.

Homework: One hour per week.

Assessment Tasks

• Performance and Participation
• Workbook/Journal
• Assignment

VCE units for which this unit will provide a helpful background

• Drama Units 1 - 4
• Theatre Studies Units 1 - 4

Graphics/ Design

Course Description

Do you want to learn ways to design and present ideas visually that show creativity and flare? Graphic Communication aims to do just that by increasing your skills with the use of different drawing techniques and media. Your role in the classroom is to be the Designer and your aim is to achieve interesting solutions to set drawing tasks, and design problems.

There are no pre-requisites to Year 10 Graphic Communications but students would gain maximum benefit from this subject if they have studied Graphic Communication at either Year 8 or 9 level.

Course Objectives

1. Expand skills in drawing and designing. 2. Develop the student’s skills in using the elements of design. 3. Develop research skills. 4. Demonstrate the application of graphic techniques within the advertising community and the home. 5. Introduce students to other avenues of graphic presentation.

Homework : Minimum 1 hour per week. Students are advised to take every opportunity to make rough sketches to assist with their folios.

Assessment Tasks

• Practical Folio • Design Development • Assignment/Theory • Examination

VCE units for which this unit will provide a helpful background

• Visual Communication Units 1 - 4, • Studio Arts Units 1 - 4.

Media Studies

There are two Media Studies areas studied:

• Photography / Visual Literacy • Video Production, Television And Film Studies

Students may choose tasks in these areas, during the semester, as skills develop

Course Description

Photography is probably the most widely used communication tool in the world. Today every magazine, newspaper, shop, showroom, manual, business and Government Department uses photographs to convey information, illustrate news, promote and sell products and services. Students will experience the basics and extension of black and white (SLR) and digital photography. In completing practical assignments a student will gain knowledge of many aspects of photography. Students will look at and study the Visual Media and how it works. A study of newspapers, magazines, TV and advertising will enable students to become aware of the way in which the media influences us. As skills develop, video production and film analysis are studied as the next sequence.

Course Aims and Objectives

Media Studies aims to provide students with the tools to effectively create, interpret and evaluate media.
Homework: 1 hour per week

Assessment Tasks

Photography / Visual Literacy/Video Task

1. Media journal a. 2 practical assignments b. assignments c. Examination

2. Video Production, Photography & Film Study

a. Media journal b. practical assignments c. assignments d. Examination

VCE units for which this unit will provide a helpful background • Media Units 1 – 4 • Studio Arts Units 1- 4

Music

Course Description

This course has been designed to provide and develop valuable skills in Musicianship and a knowledge of MUSIC history. Students contemplating Music units for VCE are advised to study this unit in Year 10. Students will be able to exercise an option on External Grade Exams in Theory/Musicianship.

Course Aims and Objectives

1. To develop further skills in Music Making (playing/singing etc) and LISTENING (Aural perception).

2. To broaden the student's knowledge of Music History and Music Styles

3. To provide enjoyment for the student & background skills for those wishing to study VCE Music

Homework: 1 hour per week with daily practise on elected instrument and study as required.

Assessment Tasks:

• Performance
• Composition
• Analysis/Music Appreciation

VCE units for which this unit will provide a helpful background

• Music Units 1 – 4

Technology

Food Technology

There are three units:

← Baking and Cake Decoration ← Cooking and Eating for Health ← Multicultural food

Each unit involves a cost to assist in the purchase of ingredients.

Aims and Objectives of Food Technology courses

1. To help students develop the physical and manipulative skills needed for competence in everyday and special occasion food preparation activities. 2. To develop in students an awareness of their eating habits and of the importance of a balanced, varied diet. 3. To encourage in students creativity, self confidence and self-sufficiency in relation to food preparation 4. To foster co-operative and productive group activities during practical sessions 5. To help students make defensible, responsible decisions concerning personal needs and the needs of others, thereby incorporating design, production and evaluation aspects of the Technology process.

Homework: 1 - 1 1/2 hours per week per unit.

VCE units for which this unit will provide a helpful background

• Food Technology Units 1 - 4

Baking and Cake Decoration

This course has a strong emphasis on the appropriateness of materials and processes to meet product design and on the role of ingredients used in baked products and cake decoration.

Students will work from briefs, prepare detailed design proposals and produce a variety of baked products including a decorated special occasion cake. During the unit students will investigate new products on the market and undertake tests in order to explore the appropriateness of foods and equipment for specific situations. They will prepare evaluation reports assessing their products for function and aesthetics.

Assessment Tasks

• Analysing the appropriateness of using certain foods • Preparing design plans • Producing food products • Evaluating products with reference to specific criteria • Exam

Cooking and Eating For Health

The emphasis in this subject is on investigating the nutritional properties of a range of foods, including new and emerging foods. Students will use a range of resources to investigate the key nutrients in foods, identifying the roles these nutrients play in maintaining a healthy body.

Students will learn how to read and interpret food labels and will develop good decision-making skills about food.

We will prepare a range of interesting, healthy foods and learn practical ways to increase the ‘healthiness’ of our favourite foods. There will be two practical classes per week.

This subject would be an excellent introduction to VCE studies in both Food & Technology and Health & Human Development.

Assessment will include:

• Analysis of the student’s own eating plan, including suggestions for improvement. • Design exercises, including meals, snacks and party foods. • Diet related disease assignment. • Food production. • Exam

Multicultural Food

This unit will broaden students' knowledge and understanding of people, cultures and foods from other countries. During this course, students will investigate foods from other countries and the preparation techniques and equipment used. Students will explore new products on the market and complete testing exercises. They will be required to work from briefs, plan for some of the production classes and complete evaluation reports on completion of production work.

Assessment Tasks

• Assignment and practical work based on a cultural group

• Analysing the appropriateness of using certain foods

• Preparing design plans

• Producing food products

• Evaluating products with reference to specific criteria

• Exam

Information Technology

There are two units: • Programming In Visual Basic • Computer applications

Programming In Visual Basic

Course Description

This unit introduces students to computer programming using Visual Basic language. The unit provides an excellent background for students with an interest in computing, especially those who plan to study Information Technology in VCE and/or as part of tertiary studies.

Due to the practical nature of this unit, at least 80% attendance would be necessary to satisfy the required tasks.

Course Aims and Objectives

The course aims are for students to: 1. Acquire and apply problem-solving and decision-making skills using information technology; 2. Operate and understand the equipment that supports information systems; 3. Develop understanding and appreciation of programming; 4. Gain confidence to take control of technology through programming; 5. Integrate multimedia tools into Visual Basic applications.

Assessment • Programming activities • Projects • Examination

VCE units for which this unit will provide a helpful background • Information Technology Units 1 - 4 • VET: Certificate III in Information Technology • Software Development Units 3 & 4 • Information Technology Applications Units 3 & 4

Computer Applications

Course Description

This unit helps students to develop the information processing skills they will need in all workplaces and further studies. It focuses on the most popular industry-standard software packages, including Multimedia file creation, and applies them to both educational and business settings.

Students will investigate the impact on, and issues relating to, use of emerging technologies in business. They will be encouraged to Design and Develop projects and Evaluate the output once it is completed.

Students will use their netbooks in all classes and for all homework tasks.

Assessment Tasks

• Digital Portfolio - a folio of documents produced using a range of Windows applications selected from: o word processing o spreadsheets o database o image editing o web site development eg Expression Web, Dreamweaver o graphical representation eg Flash, Photoshop • Understanding information and communications technology (theory assignments) • Examination • Tests

VCE units for which this unit provides an essential background

All units requiring computer skills for research or production of written or electronic information ▪ Information Technology Units 1 & 2 ▪ Information Technology Applications Units 3 & 4 ▪ Software Development Units 3 & 4

This unit helps students develop skills essential in all workplaces and further education.

Design and Technology

There are two Materials Design & Technology units offered:

• Metal/Plastics • Timber

Metal/Plastics

Course Aims and Objectives

Each semester unit aims to:

1. Develop both designing/drawing skills and productions skills, techniques, knowledge and appreciation of Metals/Plastics and its applications in jewellery, sculpture, functional products;
2. Encourage self-learning, inquiry, exploration and experimentation with metals and related materials as a medium for creative design;
3. Broaden the students’ experiences in working with these materials and processes;
4. Enable metalworking of all types to be perceived in perspective with the environment, culture and society;
5. Develop specific interests and talents of the students;
6. Broaden the knowledge of, and skills in, the “Design Process” and how to use this to their best advantage in a range of areas;
7. Encourage the awareness of decorative processes and the benefits these bring to the quality of design.

Assessment Tasks (Per Semester) • Design Folio/Notebook: Containing all design development drawings & design exercises, theory notes, handouts and brochures. • Production Model: The product of design development. • Investigation: i.e. student research on a given or negotiated topic. • Evaluation: Relating to all aspects of the student’s work; design, model and investigation. • Examination

VCE units for which this unit will provide a helpful background

▪ Design and Technology Units 1 - 4

Timber

Course Aims and Objectives

Each semester unit aims to:

1. Develop skills, techniques, knowledge, appreciation and understanding of woodcraft and its applications;
2. Encourage self-learning, inquiry and exploration of wood as a medium for creativity;
3. Broaden the realm of experiences in wood and develop the ability to carry ideas through to actualisation (i.e. concept to concrete);
4. Enable woodcraft to be put into perspective with the environment, culture and society;
5. To develop specific interests of students and to allow for the development of greater expertise in crafting wood;
6. Broaden the knowledge of the "Design Process" and how to utilise this for more satisfactory results;
7. Encourage the expansion of decorative aspects and awareness of the need thereof

Assessment Tasks

• Design Folio/Notebook: Containing all design development drawings & design exercises, theory notes, handouts and brochures. • Production Model: The product of design development • Investigation: i.e. student research on a given or negotiated topic. • Evaluation: on all tasks undertaken; design folio, production model and investigation work. • Examination

VCE units for which this unit will provide a helpful background

• Design and Technology Units 1 - 4.
HUMANITIES

Commerce Units

There are two units to choose from

• Commerce In Action • Legal Studies

Commerce In Action

Course Description

This course aims to introduce students to the exciting world of Business and to study the key factors that influence the operation of the Australian Economy. Students are encouraged to follow business and economic developments in the media as well as gain an understanding of planning, starting and operating a small business. The course also includes an introduction to personal Financial Management with the aim of preparing students for their financial futures.

Course objectives

At the completion of the unit students should have: • An understanding of the management of scarce resources • A knowledge of scarcity, opportunity cost and the price mechanism • An understanding of International Trade • An ability to list and explain the causes and effects of inflation and unemployment • A knowledge of business ownership in Australia • An understanding of the factors that contribute to a desirable business location • A knowledge of how to plan organise and market a small business • The ability to evaluate a small business plan • The ability to record and report financial information, complete banking transactions and prepare and analyse budgets. ▪ the ability to manage credit, prepare personal taxation returns and use computerised recording methods

Homework: Up to 1 hour per week

Assessment Tasks

• Topic tasks • Team presentation • Test • Exam

VCE units for which this unit will provide a useful background

• Business Management Units 1 - 4 • Accounting Units 1 - 4 • Economics Units 1 - 4

Legal Education

Course Description

This unit introduces students to various aspects of the law and how it affects them

The following topics are covered: • Nature and function of law • Government and the Australian political system • Civics and citizenship • Police and your rights • Courts and punishment • Criminal law • Civil law • The law and you

Course objectives

• To introduce the students to various aspects of the law and how it affects them • To examine the key features of Australia’s political system at local, state and federal level • To obtain a general working knowledge of aspects of the law directly affecting them as minors • To obtain an appreciation and understanding of legal matters as presented by the media

Homework: Up to one hour per week.

Assessment tasks

• Worksheets and homework • Tests • Examination

VCE Units for which this unit will provide a helpful background

• Legal Studies Units 1 - 4

Geography Units

There are two Geography units that can be studied

• Earth Challenges • Expanding Cities

Earth Challenges

Course Description

What is climate change and what can we do about it?
Is nuclear power the answer to our energy worries?
How do we solve Australia’s water shortage?
What can we do to prepare for natural disasters?
How do we protect our environment from introduced species?
What can be done to reverse the impact of deforestation?

“Earth Challenge” is a subject that poses these and other geography-related questions, encouraging students to explore important environmental and social issues facing Australia and the world. After investigating a topic, students develop management strategies and action plans focussing on how to solve the problem. This subject is for students who are concerned for their future and the future of the planet.

Topics covered include:

• Climate change and global warming • Energy options • Australia’s future • The “carbon neutral” challenge • Threatened Environments • Protecting our World Heritage sites • Managing our National Parks

Course Aims and Objectives

1. To develop investigative and research skills 2. To increase students’ awareness of environmental and social problem 3. To encourage students to make responsible decisions about their lifestyles, which reflect their concern for the future of the world 4. To demonstrate the ability to interpret information and form accurate conclusions 5. To foster critical thinking and independent work strategies 6. To enable students to experience practical applications of their environmental awareness

Homework: 1 hour per week.

Assessment Tasks

• Geographic Data Activities • Research Assignments/Essays • Management Strategies/Action Plans • Tests and Examinations

VCE units for which this subject will provide a helpful background

• VCE Geography Units 1-4
Expanding Cities

Course Description

Over time more people around the world are choosing to live in cities, leading to larger and larger metropolitan regions. Expanding Cities explores this trend, with students looking at how cities are changing over time and the impact of these changes. Problems and solutions will be investigated as students consider the sustainability of cities, including issues of population growth and expansion. A variety of cities from around the world will be closely studied as part of this course.

Course Aims and Objectives

1. To develop investigative and research skills. 2. To increase students’ understanding of reasons for the present rapid growth in urban areas. 3. To demonstrate knowledge of many of the world’s major cities. 4. To demonstrate the ability to interpret information and form accurate conclusions. 5. To foster critical thinking and independent work strategies. 6. To enable students to make accurate predictions and simulations based on evidence.

Homework: 1 hour per week.

Assessment Tasks

• Geographic Data Activities • Research Assignments/Essays • Simulation Exercises and Management Strategies • Tests and Examinations

VCE units for which this subject will provide a helpful background

• VCE Geography, Units 1-4

History Units

There are two History units that can be studied

• American History • War and Peace

American History

Course Description

This unit examines various themes in the history of the U.S.A., from the original inhabitants – the Indians, until the twentieth century. Some of the major themes studied include:

• Natural Frontiers • First Americans – The Indians • European Colonisation • Pilgrims and Puritans • Slavery • War of Independence • The Civil Rights Movement of the 1960’s • The Civil War and its Aftermath

Course Aims and Objectives

1. To stimulate interest in history and develop an empathy with the past. 2. To develop investigative and research skills and familiarise students with the principles of historical inquiry. 3. To increase students’ awareness of the influence of the past on the present. 4. To confront students with values, attitudes and perspectives radically different from their own, thereby encouraging them to think more deeply about inherited values and attitudes. 5. To extend students’ abilities in the following areas: o group work and co-operative learning o essay writing o detecting bias o independent analysis o discriminating between fact and opinion o distinguishing between primary and secondary sources o debate

Homework: 1 hour per week.

Assessment Tasks

• Mapping Exercises • Research Assignments/Essays • Document/Film Analysis • Tests and Examinations

VCE units for which this subject will provide a helpful background

• VCE History, Units 1-4

War and Peace

Course Description

This course examines the turmoil of the Twentieth Century, focussing upon Hitler’s Germany, increasing Japanese militarism in the Pacific, and the Cold War conflict in Vietnam. Conflicts such as these have had an incredible impact on our lives, in an Australian and international context.

However, in spite of these conflicts, there have been moves of co-operation as well. War and Peace also examines and assesses co-operative endeavours such as The League of Nations as an instrument of peace.

Course Aims and Objectives

1. To stimulate interest in history and develop an empathy with the past 2. To develop investigative and research skills and familiarise students with the principles of historical inquiry 3. To increase students’ awareness of the influence of the past on the present 4. To confront students with values, attitudes and perspectives radically different from their own, thereby encouraging them to think more deeply about inherited values and attitudes 5. To extend students’ abilities in the following areas, o group work and co-operative learning o essay writing o detecting bias o independent analysis o discriminating between fact and opinion o distinguishing between primary and secondary sources o debate

Homework: 1 hour per week.

Assessment Tasks

• Mapping Exercises • Research Assignments/Essays • Document/Film Analysis • Tests and Examinations

VCE units for which this subject will provide a helpful background

• VCE History Units 1-4

Physical Education and Health

There are four Physical Education and Health units that can be studied

• PE A (Improving Performance) • PE B ( Developing a Training Program) • PE and Health for Girls • PE and Health for Boys

PE A (Improving Performance)

Course Description

This course is designed to introduce students to topics that will be studied during Year 11 and 12 VCE Physical Education. It also provides students who may not wish to continue PE further, with an understanding of areas involved in improving the performance of athletes and participants in Sport and Physical Activity.

Theory Components
Unit 1: Mechanical Principles of Movement
Unit 2: Sport Coaching
Unit 3: Learning Movement skills

Practical Component
Individual and Team Sports
* Practical will complement theory material

Assessment Tasks • 90% participation in practical component • Practical laboratory reports and participation • 2 Unit Tests • Assignments • End of Semester Exam

Homework: Minimum 1 hour per week.

VCE units for which this subject will provide a helpful background

• Physical Education Units 1 - 4

PE B (Developing A Training Program)

Course Description

This course is designed to introduce students to topics that will be studied during Year 11 and 12 VCE Physical Education. The course aims to provide students who wish to undertake VCE PE with greater preparation and knowledge to achieve outcomes. It also provides students who may not wish to continue PE further, with an understanding of areas involved in developing and implementing a personal training program and issues that surround participating in physical activity.

It is recommended that students who undertake Physical Education For Girls do not complete this unit due to an overlap of topics.

Theory Components

Unit 1: Developing a Training Program • Muscular- Skeletal System • Games Analysis • Fitness Testing • Training Methods • Principles of Training • Setting Goals

Unit 2: Participating in Physical Activity • Myths associated with Fitness and training • Drugs in Sport • Food for training

Practical Component • Participation in a Personal Training Program • Individual and team activities that complement the theory component of the course.

Assessment Tasks • 90% Participation in practical activities • Development of a training program (Major Assignment) • 2 Unit Test • End of Semester Exam

Homework: Minimum 1 hour per week.

VCE units for which this subject will provide a helpful background

• Physical Education Units 1 - 4

PE and Health For Girls

Course Description

This course is designed to meet the needs of girls. As a result, practical activities have been chosen that complement the theory component and have been identified by girls as their preference. The intention of the course is to maintain the involvement of girls in PE and to develop interest in fitness and fun activities, which can be maintained outside of the structured school environment. It also aims to educate girls in the important areas of nutrition, diet and fitness. There will be expenses incurred for excursions.

It is recommended that students who undertake this course do not choose PEB to avoid any overlap of material.

Theory Components

|Unit 1: Developing a healthy Lifestyle |
|Nutrition |
|Body Image |
|Diet/Weight Loss |
|Diseases and Disorders |
|Unit 2: Women and Fitness |
|Fitness Components |
|Training Methods and Principles |
|Participation and Motivation in Sport |
|Women and Sport in the Media |
| |

Assessment Tasks • 90% Participation in practical activity • Research Assignment • Unit Tests • End of Semester Exam

Homework: Minimum 1 hour per week.

VCE units for which this subject will provide a helpful background

• Physical Education Units 1 – 4 • Health and Human Development Units 1 - 4

PE and Health for Boys

Course Description

This subject focuses on PE and Health issues specifically relating to boys. PE and Health for Boys is designed to introduce coursework that would prepare them for VCE PE and Health and Human Development. Units covered include Nutrition, Drugs in Sport, Health and Development issues across differing populations, Sexuality, Fitness Training and Components. Practical classes will be weekly and will relate to the course work with a strong emphasis on Fitness Training and external boxing classes.

Practical Component

Will be based on student interest but are likely to include: • Fitness Training • Boxing • Weights training

Assessment Tasks • 90% Participation in practical activity • Research Assignment • Unit Tests • Development of a Training Program • End of Semester Exam

Homework: Minimum 1 hour per week

Science

Students have the options of two science electives • Understanding Science • Science Applications

Understanding Science

Course Description

Students who are contemplating attempting any Science VCE units are assumed to have acquired a level of skills and knowledge before they enter these courses. This unit provides the opportunity to gain the extra attributes required above those already gained up to Year 9.

Topics covered in this unit include • Chemical and physical reactions • Atomic theory and electron arrangement and their relation to the properties of elements. • The Periodic Table. • Writing and balancing chemical equations. • Acids and Bases • Forces and motion • DNA and cell division

Course Aims and Objectives 1. Develop language and methodology in the physical sciences. 2. Further develop practical skills required for activities in Physics, Chemistry and Biology. 3. Investigate Atomic Theory and relate it to concepts of Chemistry. 4. Learn how to write chemical formulae and equations using chemical symbols. 5. Investigate the nature of and interaction between forces and motion. 6. Know the structure and function of DNA. 7. Know the purpose of mitosis and meiosis and compare these cell divisions

Homework: approximately two hours per week.

Assessment Tasks • Practical reports • Assignments • Tests • Examination • Oral presentations

VCE units for which this unit will provide a helpful background: • Physics Units 1 - 4 • Chemistry Units 1 – 4 • Biology Units 1 - 4

Science Applications

Course Description

This course is design for students who have an interest in hands on science and science that takes place in our everyday lives. Students will develop a broad understanding for the role science plays and will build on knowledge from year 9 concepts.

Course Aims and Objectives
In this subject students will be developing their ability to communicate in a scientific manner. They will focus on improving their structure and analysis in practical report writing and ability to clearly identify variables and factors that affect outcomes. They will be expected to identify laws and concepts in real life applications and explain the role it has to play. Topics that students undertake include; forensic science, physics and genetics.

Homework; 1 hour per week

Assessment Tasks • Practical reports • Assignments • Participation in activities • Exam

VCE Units for Which This Unit will Provide a Helpful Background • Physics Units 1 – 4 • Biology Units 1 - 4

‘Other’ Electives

Dance

Course Description

This course is designed to provide students to develop their skills in human movement. This subject will be composed of theory and practical requirements that will build the students understanding of the performing arts.

Aims and Objectives

Students who undertake Dance will spend the semester learning a variety of dance styles including; Jazz, Hip Hop, Ballet, Contemporary, Commercial Jazz, Acrobatics/Tumbling and Sport Aerobics.
Students will also study in theory class the following topics safe dance practise, history of dance, make up and costuming, fitness for dance and health living.

Homework; 1 hour per week and dance rehearsal as needed.

Assessment

• Assignment(s) • Class dance performance • Choreograph Solo Dance performance • Tests • Exam

Work Education

In work education students will be introduced to the concepts of the 8 Employability Skills and Key Personal Attributes. They will set goals, locate and research career information, prepare for and role play job interviews. Students will become aware of their rights and responsibilities in the work place.

Students will also be expected to investigate a workplace of their choice and learn about work practices including industrial relations, equal opportunity and Work Cover. Students will prepare for their Semester 2 Work Placement and are required to attend organised career adventures and work place visits.

Course Aims and Objectives

Work Education hopes to offer students an opportunity to become better informed about the world of work. It hopes to provide them with skills and knowledge which will help them in their working lives and their career choices.

The course is based on the premise that we are all workers. As such it is important to know what work is and why people work. Students will be engaged in enquiry based learning and will hopefully gain an understanding of the importance of work to their lives and to society as a whole.

Assessment Tasks 1. Folio 2. Project Work 3. Interview Work 4. Exam

VCE Units for Which This Unit will Provide a Helpful Background ▪ Industry and Enterprise Studies, Units 1-4.

Personal Development Skills

Course Description

Students completing Personal Development will improve their leadership, team work, communication skills, ICT skills and develop a greater understanding of healthy lifestyles. They will also gain an appreciation of different cultures and historical events that have shaped their local community. Students will be required to participate in activities that give back to the local community.

This is a hands on unit of study which will include incursions and excursions with relevant costs.

Course Aims and Objectives

This is a personal development course that is designed to develop student’s attributes and strengthen skills/abilities that will enhance their appeal to employers. Students will have knowledge of past and current issues, events and be culturally aware in their local and wider community.

Homework: one half to one hour per week

Assessment Tasks 1. Assignments 2. Work book 3. Participation in events. 4. Exam

VCE Units for Which This Unit will Provide a Helpful Background • Industry and Enterprise Studies, Units 1-4.

Psychology

This subject is designed to stimulate students’ interest in some of specialist, fields of Psychology. This course will help develop an understanding of Psychology terminology, concepts and skills related to understading human behaviour. It also provides substantial preparation for VCE studies in this subject.

Topics covered in this unit:

• Introduction to Psychology

• Introduction to brain and nervous system

• Sport Psychology

• Forensic Psychology

• Sleep and dreaming

• Other topics to be negotiated , but may include: Adolescence, Social Psychology and Happiness

Course Aims and Objectives:

These are to:

• Develop an understanding of the relationship between cognition, emotions and behaviour in humans and animals.

• Develop Psychology research and reporting skills

• Discover the many fields of Psychology and the opportunities each offers

• Develop the ability to use Psychology terminology as well as understanding

its scientific approach to understanding human behaviour

Homework: approx 1 ½ hours per week

Assessment Tasks:

• Practical Reports

• Learning Activities

• Worksheets

• Tests

• Examination

VCE units for which this unit will provide a helpful background:

• Psychology Units 1 – 4

• Health Units 1 – 4

• Biology Units 1 – 4

Please see Appendix for Course Application Forms

VOCATIONAL PATHWAYS COURSE

All students will study the following core subjects and will then be required to select 4 free choice subjects:

Foundation English

Foundation English is a literacy course designed for students who need additional assistance to strengthen and refine their literacy skills. The course will draw on and strengthen the knowledge and skills students have acquired about texts and language in previous English studies.

Course Aims and Objectives

1. To develop students’ language skills for, speaking and listening, reading and writing. 2. To further develop students’ ability to understand and analyse a variety of texts

Assessment Tasks • Text response • Oral presentation • Writing: personal, argumentative, informative, instructional, imaginative, descriptive • Exam

VCE units for which this unit will provide a background for

• English units 1 – 4, • English Literature units 1 – 4, • Foundation English units 1 – 2

Everyday Maths

Everyday Maths is a Numeracy Course. This course is a selection of topics chosen from time, topology, number, money, algebra, statistics, coordinates and graphs, percentages, measurement, ratio and proportion, probability and consumer mathematics. Each term students will be required to complete a project.

Course Aims and Objectives

1. Develop knowledge and skills in the areas of Basic Skills, Managing Money, Applied Mathematics and Geometry; 2. Apply knowledge and skills in these areas of study to analyse, investigate and solve problems in a variety of situations; 3. Allow students to experience a range of classroom activities and have a variety of mathematical experiences; 4. Communicate mathematical ideas; 5. Make effective use of computers and calculators in relation to the areas of this unit.

Assessment Tasks 1. Examination 2. Tests 3. Assignments and Projects 4. Productive participation in all activities.

NOTE: Everyday maths leads to Year 11 Foundation Maths 1 and 2. Year 11 Foundation Maths DOES NOT lead to Year 12 Maths courses.

Work Education

In work education students will be introduced to the concepts of the 8 Employability Skills and Key Personal Attributes. They will set goals, locate and research career information, prepare for and role play job interviews. Students will become aware of their rights and responsibilities in the work place.

Students will also be expected to investigate a workplace of their choice and learn about work practices including industrial relations, equal opportunity and Work Cover. Students will prepare for their Semester 2 Work Placement and are required to attend organised career adventures and work place visits.

Course Aims and Objectives

Work Education hopes to offer students an opportunity to become better informed about the world of work. It hopes to provide them with skills and knowledge which will help them in their working lives and their career choices.

The course is based on the premise that we are all workers. As such it is important to know what work is and why people work. Students will be engaged in enquiry based learning and will hopefully gain an understanding of the importance of work to their lives and to society as a whole.

Assessment Tasks 1. Folio 2. Project Work 3. Interview Work 4. Exam

Personal Development Skills

Students completing Personal Development Skills will improve their leadership, team work and communication skills, and develop a greater understanding of healthy lifestyles. They will also gain an appreciation of different cultures and historical events that have shaped Australia. Students will be required to participate in activities that give back to the local community.

Course Aims and Objectives

This is a personal development course that is designed to develop student’s attributes and strengthen skills/abilities that will enhance their appeal to employers. Students will have knowledge of past and current issues, events and be culturally aware in their local and wider community.

Assessment Tasks 1. Folio 2. Project Work 3. Participation in activities. 4. Exam

The following table shows how a fortnightly program in a Vocational Pathways course operates.

SEMESTER 1

Subjects Periods

Foundation English x 8

Everyday Maths x 8

Work Education x 8

Free choice x 16

SEMESTER 2

Subjects Periods

Foundation English x 8

Everyday Maths x 8

Personal Development Skills x 8

Free Choice x 16

TOTAL PERIODS PER FORTNIGHT PER SEMESTER 40

One day a week throughout the year students will be attending their TAFE courses and work experience visits. On these days classes will continue with work. Staff will accommodate for students in the Vocational Pathways Program by consulting with students.

Please see Appendix for Course Application Forms

VCE

Victorian Certificate of Education

VCE stands for the Victorian Certificate of Education. The VCE is a two year program of study for students in Years 11 and 12. To receive the certificate a student must successfully complete at least 16 units out of 20 units studied over two years. All students will enrol in five subjects in Year 11 and 12.

Each unit lasts for one semester or half a year. Units 1 and 2 are generally undertaken by Year 11 students. Units 3 and 4 are generally undertaken by Year 12 students. Units 1 and 2 can be completed as single or non sequential units, whereas Units 3 and 4 must be completed together as a sequence, that is, paired. For example a student in Year 11 interested in studying Physical Education could undertake either Unit 1 or Unit 2 at that level whereas a Year 12 student interested in this subject must undertake both Units 3 and 4. All studies are designed in such a way that Units 3 and 4 sequences can theoretically commence without prerequisites. However, a sound study background in a particular area will assist with VCE units.
Staff will offer advice to students at the end of Year 11 about subject choices for Units 3 and 4, in accordance with their results in Units 1 and 2.
VCE studies cover a range of different areas - the Arts, English, Health and Physical Education, Humanities, Mathematics, Science and Technology. The VCE studies offered at Carwatha College P-12 can be located elsewhere on this CD.

TO BE AWARDED THE VCE CERTIFICATE:
The minimum requirement for a student’s program for the award of the VCE is satisfactory completion of 16 units which include: • Three units from the English group – see below • Three sequences of Units 3 and 4 studies other than English, can include VCE VET Unit 3 and 4 sequences
English requirements
Three units of English may be selected from English Units 1 to 4, English/EAL Units 1 to 4, and Literature Units 1 to 4.

No more than two units at Units 1 and 2 levels selected from English Units 1 and 2 and Literature Units 1 and 2 may count towards the English requirement.

An English sequence will count as a sequence other than English when (a) it is additional to a student satisfying three units from the English group, or (b) the student has satisfied more than one sequence from the English group. Students may not obtain credit for both English Units 3 and 4 and English EAL Units 3 and 4.

TO SATISFACTORILY COMPLETE A UNIT
OF STUDY:
Each VCE unit includes a set of two to four outcomes. These outcomes must be achieved for satisfactory completion of the unit. Achievement of the outcomes is based on the teacher’s assessment of the student’s performance on assessment tasks designated for the unit.
Satisfactory completion of units is determined by the school, in accordance with the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority requirements.

OUTCOMES:
Outcomes are the knowledge and skills that a student must demonstrate during the course of the unit. These outcomes will be achieved through a variety of activities set by the teacher. Examples of the type of work that students will complete during class time include maintaining a folio, laboratory work, projects, essays, research work, oral presentation, design and construction of models, problem solving exercises, tests and examinations.

A student must satisfactorily demonstrate all outcomes to gain an S for the unit. In addition, at Year 11 students will receive a level of performance in the form of a letter grade (A+ to E satisfactory; UG unsatisfactory). These are determined by the College and will appear on the college report but not on the VCE Statement of Results.

In Year 12, students will receive an S or N for the College assessment component, an examination grade and a Study Score at the end of that year.

SCHOOL ASSESSED COURSEWORK (SAC)
AND SCHOOL ASSESSED TASKS (SAT):
School assessed coursework is made up of a number of assessment tasks that are specified in the study design. These assessment tasks are used to assess the unit learning outcomes. • Assessment tasks are part of the regular teaching and learning program • Majority of the task must be completed in class time • They are to be completed in a limited timeframe

School Assessed Tasks
Art, Media, Studio Arts, Design Technology, Food and Technology, and Visual Communication and Design require students to develop a folio of work which makes up the School Assessed Task.

Authentication
Authentication is the term used to cover the procedures for ensuring that the work submitted by students is genuinely their own.
Work completed over an extended period of time (generally School Assessed Tasks in Arts or Technology studies) cannot just be completed out of class without supervision and then handed in. Any work completed over an extended period is to be done by a process of planning, drafts and consultation with the teacher along the way until a finished piece of work is submitted. Some of the work will be done in class and some out of class, but all of it will be monitored by the teacher from start to finish ensuring that the work is genuinely that of the student.
Most of the assessable work in the other studies will be completed in class time as part of the regular teaching and learning program.
Procedures which help teachers to authenticate student work are: • Work totally or partially completed in class under a teacher's supervision • Keeping records • Setting a test or requiring an oral explanation of work • Knowledge of student's ability and past history • Insisting on drafts, where appropriate, being submitted and sighted • Checking submitted drafts and consultation with the student • Changing topics if appropriate

Where a school is satisfied, on the basis of evidence, that a student has submitted work that is not his or her own, the Principal determines the resulting action for the breach of rules in accordance with VCAA guidelines.
Such penalties include: • a reprimand • making arrangements for the student to resubmit the work • refusing to accept the work • Cancelling the result

REPORTING OF RESULTS
The Victorian Curriculum & Assessment Authority (VCAA) will issue on completion of the VCE, a Statement of Results which will show whether or not all units are completed satisfactorily (S or N). It will also show the student’s school assessment and examination grades, and a Study Score out of 50 for each Unit 3-4 sequence.

STUDY SCORES
Students’ overall achievement for each subject is calculated and reported as a Study Score (Relative Position) on a scale of 0 to 50.
In order to qualify for a Study Score, a student must have a satisfactory completion of both Units 3 and 4 in that study.
Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR) The ATAR uses a student’s study scores from Units 3 and 4 studies. It is calculated by VTAC (Victorian Tertiary Admission Centre), and is the primary, but not the only means, of deciding what tertiary courses the student will be offered after completing his/her VCE.

THE GENERAL ACHIEVEMENT TEST
(GAT)
Every student who is enrolled in a Unit 3 and 4 study – whether in Year 11 or 12, must sit the General Achievement Test (GAT). The GAT is a general test that measures students’ level of general achievement in three key areas of study, which include:

• Written communication • Mathematics, Science and Technology • Humanities, Arts and Social Science

Sitting the GAT is compulsory although it does not form part of the VCE graduation requirements, and it does not contribute to the VCE results. The GAT is a form of ‘insurance policy’ for the student in the event of illness during the examination period, or in the event that some other issue prevents the student from sitting an examination. The student’s performance on the GAT can be called upon to obtain a derived exam score. In addition, many universities are beginning to use the GAT results in selecting their students. It is therefore in the students’ best interests to do as well as they possibly can on the GAT. Students will be informed of GAT results at the end of the year.

VCE REQUIREMENTS at CARWATHA COLLEGE P-12

PROMOTIONS
Year 10 students’ progress to a Senior Studies Program is not automatic. It is based on satisfactory completion of Year 10 and satisfactory attendance over the year. A review of each student’s performance will take place at the end of the academic year to determine promotion to Year 11.

It is recommended that entry into Year 12 depends upon satisfactory completion (S) of six units in Year 11. Continuation in a subject requires assessment grades which indicate competence in that subject. Promotions are considered in consultation with parents/ guardians. In addition, parents/guardians have the opportunity to attend formal interviews at parent-student-teacher nights. Parents/guardians may request an interview with the Sub-school Leader or Year Level Coordinator at any time.

ATTENDANCE
At Carwatha College P-12 ALL students in Years 11 and 12 are required to attend College for a minimum of 80% of scheduled classes to complete the year or the semester unit satisfactorily. Absences are advised to be covered by medical certificates or appropriate professional evidence. If students are ill and have missed the date for completion of coursework, a valid medical certificate must be provided immediately on return to school before the student will be allowed to undertake coursework which has been missed. Medical certificates must be handed to the Sub School Leader for an extension to be granted. Assessment in the VCE is continuous and is based on completion of set tasks throughout the year. Students need to attend regularly and may have their enrolment reviewed if attendance at College is poor. Where a student has completed work but there has been a substantive breach of attendance rules, the school may assign N to the unit.

ABSENCE ON DAY OF A SAC
If students are ill on the day of a School Assessed Coursework (SAC) task, a valid medical certificate must be produced before the student will be allowed to undertake the SAC which has been missed. If a student is unable to produce a medical certificate, he/she may be allowed to undertake the SAC to demonstrate the Outcome, but the SAC will not be scored, and the student will obtain a zero for it. In instances of extenuating circumstances, the onus is on the student to contact the College prior to the SAC to advise relevant coordinators of their situation. The Sub School Leader reserves the right to make decisions on a case-by-case basis where there are extenuating circumstances.

PLANNING A YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 COURSE OF STUDY
The information on this CD should be studied carefully so that students are fully aware of the studies, prerequisites and possibilities provided in terms of career or future study. Students must be very careful when making choices to ensure they are appropriate. Students and their parents/guardians should discuss possible choices together before making a final selection. Teachers should also be consulted, especially when doubt exists as to the student's abilities, relevance of a course to career goals, content, assessment or any other matters. Students should carefully consider their interests, abilities and prerequisites for various courses in making their choices.

GET THE RIGHT ADVICE FIRST.
Where is help available?
♦ Subject Teachers, who can advise you of the expectations and requirements to undertake and successfully complete the VCE/VCAL subject.
♦ College course counsellors will be available to work with you, to direct you to sources of information, check over your selection to ensure VCE/VCAL eligibility and generally support you as you try to plan out a course of study which suits your particular needs.
♦ College Careers Coordinator, who can provide up to date career advice and other contacts. This can make you aware of the range of jobs and courses that are available which might suit your interests and talents.
♦ Handbooks of TAFE colleges and tertiary institutions which are available in the Pathways office.
♦ VTAC Guide to university and TAFE courses which are available in the Careers Room.
♦VICTER (Victorian Tertiary Entrance Requirement Booklet) 2012 and 2013.
Year 11 Students 2012
Students with a particular course in mind must check prerequisite subjects in VICTER 2014 in The Age Tertiary Supplement published in August.
Year 12 Students 2012
Students with a particular course in mind must check prerequisite subjects in VICTER 2013.
♦ Internet Services
PLANNING A VCE/VET/VCAL PROGRAM
Students at Carwatha College P-12 have a number of options available to them over the next two years. These include: • Full VCE study program • VCAL – Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning. • VETis (Vocational Education and Training in Schools Program)/TAFE certificate with your VCE. Refer to the relevant section on this disk, as well as see Mr Sheahan, for further details regarding the VET option. • Provision of studies by an Outside Provider. Students undertaking a LOTE with the Victorian School of Languages on a Saturday should ensure they seek and confirm their enrolment, and notify the Sub-school Leader by providing all relevant documentation for that enrolment. If you are undertaking a Unit 1/2 or Unit 3/4 LOTE course outside College, you may enrol in one less subject at the College. Students undertaking any other VCE units outside the College e.g. Dance, must provide relevant information and documentation to their Year Level Coordinator.
Subject costs
Please note that some specialist subjects may incur an additional fee to cover costs for the provision of resources.

THE CHALLENGE OF UNDERTAKING UNITS 3 AND 4 IN YEAR 11
As the Senior School timetable is blocked together. Prospective VCE 11 students may consider the opportunity to undertake one Unit 3 and 4 sequences as part of their VCE 11 program. The advantage of this is it enables students to complete SIX 3 and 4 sequences over two years which will add to the ATAR; this may improve students’ chances of tertiary entry. However, the work is more difficult and it requires serious commitment and study. Not all 3 and 4 sequences can be undertaken in Year 11, so it is important that students refer to each study description. Students will still be required to undertake 5 Unit 3/4 sequences in their Year 12. Ultimately, any decision must be based on a realistic assessment of the student’s abilities.

Year 11 students wanting to undertake a Unit ¾ subject will be considered on the following basis: • Consistently strong academic performance in Year 10 • Demonstrates commitment and motivation to work at the highest possible standard • There is room available within the class; after year 12 students have been allocated into classes

Assistance in Choosing Your Career
As well as discussing career aspirations with the College’s Careers Teacher and other College personnel, students may feel they need further information to assist them in making realistic decisions in their choice of career. The following organisations may be of assistance:
YOUTH ACCESS CENTRES:
Youth Links 31-33 Buckley Street
NOBLE PARK, 3174
Phone: 9547 0511
Visy Cares 39A Clow Street
DANDENONG, 3175
Phone: 9793 2155
More Information about Subjects and Careers
PUBLICATIONS TO CONSULT:
The Job Guide for Victoria (library, Careers Teacher).
The VICTER Guide for Prospective Students for information and requirements regarding college and university courses (Library, Careers Teacher).
VTAC’s web site www.vtac.edu.au
VCAA’s web site www.vcaa.vic.edu.au
Unit description booklet
TEACHERS TO CONSULT:
Year 10, 11 and Year 12 Coordinators and Sub-School Leaders
MIPS mentors
Careers Teacher
Year 11 and 12 class teachers for information on individual subjects.
Learning Area Coordinators for information on individual subjects.
The Admissions Officers at Colleges and Universities for information on entry requirements (telephone numbers available in the VICTER Guides and in the Job Guide).
2011 Key Learning Area Co-ordinators:
English Mrs D Szlawski
Mathematics Mr J Haddad
Science Mr. Y Verhatsky
SOSE Mrs M Wood
Commerce Mrs G Harper
Information Technology Mrs G Harper
The Arts Mr G Phillips
Technology Mrs G Hetherton/Mr G Skeggs
Health/PE Mr L Murphy
Languages Other than English (L.O.T.E.) Ms K Friend

| |
|VCE SUBJECTS OFFERED AT CARWATHA COLLEGE P-12 2013 |
|Biology |LOTE (Languages other than English) |
|Business Management |Legal Studies |
|Chemistry |Literature |
|Product Design and Technology |Mathematics |
|Drama |Media |
|English/English as an Additional Language/Literature |Physical Education |
|Food and Technology |Physics |
|Health and Human Development |Psychology |
|History |Studio Arts |
|Information Technology |Visual Communication and Design |
| | |

Note: although the above subjects are offered there needs to be strong demand for the subject to run.

Biology

Biology is the study of living organisms, life processes and the different levels of organisation from the cell to the biosphere. It includes the study of interactions between organisms and between organisms and their environments. It considers the unity and continuity of life as well as diversity and change.

Unit 1: Unity and diversity

In this unit students examine the cell as the structural and functional unit of the whole organism. Students investigate the needs of individual cells, how specialised structures and organelles carry out cellular activities and how the survival of cells depends on their ability to maintain a dynamic balance between their internal and external environments.

Unit 2: Organisms and their environment

In this unit students investigate what changes have taken place in selected ecosystems, how ecological principles can be applied to conserve natural ecosystems, to restore damaged ones and to ensure sustainability of the biosphere. Students investigate how technologies are being applied to monitor natural ecosystems and to manage systems developed to provide resources for humans.

Students investigate how features possessed by plants and animals affect their fitness and reproductive success, in relation to their habitats. They consider how species are affected by changes in environmental conditions, whether natural or human-induced, and study their adaptations and behaviours.

Assessment

Satisfactory Completion: Achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.

Levels of Achievement

Units 1 and 2: Tests, exam, projects, practical reports.

Units 3 and 4

School- assessed coursework, and an end-of-year examination.

• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 20 per cent • Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 20 per cent • End-of-year examination: 60 per cent.

Business Management

In contemporary Australian society, there are a wide variety of business organisations which vary in terms of size, ownership, objectives, resources and location. These organisations are managed by people who put in place systems and processes to achieve a range of objectives.

Business Management examines the ways in which people at various levels within a business organisation manage resources to achieve the objectives of the organisation. Students develop an understanding of the challenges, complexity and rewards that come from business management and gain insight into the various ways resources can be managed in small, medium and large-scale organisations.

The study recognises that there is a range of management theories rather than a single theory of management. Each unit examines some of these theories and, through exposure to real business scenarios and/or direct contact with business, tests them against management in practice.

In studying Business Management, students develop knowledge and skills that enhance their confidence and ability to participate effectively, as socially responsible and ethical members of the business community, and as informed citizens, consumers and investors.

Unit 1: Small Business Management

Small rather than large businesses make up the large majority of all businesses in the Australian economy. It is the small business sector that provides a wide variety of goods and services for both consumers and industries, such as manufacturing, construction and retail. This, combined with employment opportunities, makes the small business sector a vital component in the success, growth and stability of Australia. Small businesses are tangible to students as they are visible and accessible in daily life. This unit provides an opportunity for students to explore the operations of a small business and its likelihood of success.

Unit 2: Communication and management

This unit focuses on the importance of effective communication in achieving business objectives. Students investigate communication both internal and external to the business. They develop knowledge of aspects of business communication and are introduced to skills related to its effective use in different contexts. The vital functions of marketing and public relations are considered, with students developing an understanding of the important role these functions play in the ultimate success of a business.

Unit 3: Corporate management

In this unit students investigate how large-scale organisations operate. Students examine the environment (both internal and external) in which large-scale organisations conduct their business, and then focus on aspects of individual businesses’ internal environment and how the operations of the business are managed. Students develop an understanding of the complexity and challenge of managing large-scale organisations and have the opportunity to compare theoretical perspectives with practical applications.

Unit 4: Managing people and change

This unit continues the examination of corporate management. It commences with a focus on the human resource management function. Students learn about the key aspects of this function and strategies used to most effectively manage human resources. The unit concludes with analysis of the management of change. Students learn about key change management processes and strategies and are provided with the opportunity to apply these to a contemporary issue of significance.

Entry: There are no prerequisites for entry to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4

Assessment

Satisfactory Completion: Achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.

LEVELS OF ACHIEVEMENT

Units 1 and 2:

Student will be informed of the assessment procedures at the commencement of each unit

Unit 3 and 4

School-assessed coursework (includes essays, tests and case studies) and end-of-year examination

• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 25 per cent • Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 25 per cent • Unit 3 and 4 examination: 50 per cent.

Chemistry

Chemical processes are important in improving human health, preventing environmental problems and rehabilitating degraded environments. In this study of Chemistry a thematic approach has been adopted and throughout the study contexts have been provided to apply chemical knowledge to technology and society. Students will investigate, explore and solve qualitative and quantitative problems and discuss chemical concepts and issues.

Unit 1: The Big ideas of Chemistry

This unit examines a range of chemical processes and activities through the study of common materials. The chemical nature of materials is explored through an investigation of their properties and their modification. All areas of study in this unit involve the design and performance of experiments.

Unit 2: Environmental Chemistry

This unit examines a range of chemical reactions with the emphasis on the writing of chemical equations and performance of calculations based upon them. Students are encouraged to evaluate the environmental impact of human activity on the biosphere. All areas of the study involve the design and performance of scientific experiments.

Unit 3: Chemical Pathways

This unit examines a range of techniques and instruments used in chemical analysis. Organic chemistry is introduced and applied to identify and explain the role of functional groups in organic reactions and construct reaction pathways using particular starting molecules. All areas of study involve the design and performance of experiments.

Unit 4: Chemistry at Work

This unit focuses on the analysis of factors that determine the optimum conditions used in the industrial production and the energy changes associated with chemical reactions. Again, design and performance of experiments is important in the unit.

Entry: Before entry into Units 1 and 2 Chemistry, students need to have completed a minimum of one of the preparatory Science units offered in Year 10. In view of the sequential nature of the study, students need to undertake Units 1 and 2 before Units 3 and 4. Students must complete Units 3 and 4 as a sequence.

Assessment
Satisfactory Completion: Achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.
LEVELS OF ACHIEVEMENT

Units 1 and 2:

Students will be informed of the assessment procedures at the commencement of each unit.

Units 3 and 4 School assessed coursework, and a 2.5 hour end-of-year examination.

• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 20 per cent • Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 20 per cent • Unit 4 examination: 60 per cent
Product Design and Technology

Central to VCE Product Design and Technology is the Product design process, which provides a structure for students to develop effective design practice. The design process involves identification of a real need that is then articulated in a design brief. The need is investigated and informed by research to aid the development of solutions that take the form of physical, three-dimensional functional products. Development of these solutions requires the application of technology and a variety of cognitive and physical skills, including creative design thinking, drawing and computer-aided design, testing processes and materials, planning, construction, fabrication and evaluation.
In VCE Product Design and Technology students assume the role of a designer-maker. In adopting this role, they acquire and apply knowledge of factors that influence design. Students address the design factors relevant to their design situation.
The knowledge and use of resources is integral to product design. These resources include a range of materials, and the tools, equipment and machines needed to transform these materials in a safe manner into useful products. Increasingly, the importance of environmental sustainability is having an impact on product design and development. More sustainable approaches are therefore at the forefront throughout the product lifecycle.

Unit 1: Product re-design and sustainability
This unit focuses on the analysis, modification and improvement of a product design with consideration of the materials used and issues of sustainability. Finite resources and the proliferation of waste require sustainable product design thinking. Many products in use today have been redesigned to suit the changing needs and demands of users but with little consideration of their sustainability. Students consider the use of materials from a sustainable viewpoint. Sustainable practices claimed to be used by designers are examined.

Unit 2: Collaborative design
In this unit students work in teams to design and develop an item in a product range or contribute to the design, planning and production of a group product. They focus on factors including: human needs and wants; function, purpose and context for product design; aesthetics; materials and sustainability; and the impact of these factors on a design solution. Students also examine the use of ICT to facilitate teams that work collaboratively but are spread across the globe.

Unit 3: Applying the Product design process
In this unit students are engaged in the design and development of a product that meets the needs and expectations of a client and/or an end-user, developed through a design process and influenced by a range of complex factors. These factors include the purpose, function and context of the product; human-centred design factors; innovation and creativity; visual, tactile and aesthetic factors; sustainability concerns; economic limitations; legal responsibilities; material characteristics and properties; and technology. Design and product development and manufacture occur in a range of settings. An industrial setting provides a marked contrast to that of a ‘one-off situation’ in a small ‘cottage’ industry or a school setting. Although a product design process may differ in complexity or order, it is central to all of these situations regardless of the scale or context. This unit examines different settings and takes students through the Product design process as they design for others.

Unit 4: Product development and evaluation
In this unit students learn that evaluations are made at various points of product design, development and production. In the role of designer, students judge the suitability and viability of design ideas and options referring to the design brief and evaluation criteria in collaboration with a client and/or an end-user. Comparisons between similar products help to judge the success of a product in relation to a range of Product design factors. The environmental, economic and social impact of products throughout their life cycle can be analysed and evaluated with reference to the Product design factors.

This study engages students in technological tasks that call on their knowledge and understanding of materials and production processes to design and make products suitable for their intended purpose. Students also have opportunities to undertake production activities often related to industrial and commercial practices.

Entry: There are no prerequisites for entry to Units 1 and 2. For entry to Unit 3, students who have not completed Units 1 and 2 are strongly advised to consult the Unit 3/4 teacher. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4.
Assessment

Satisfactory Completion: Demonstrated achievement of outcomes specified for the unit.

LEVELS OF ACHIEVEMENT

UNIT 1 AND 2:

Students will be informed of the assessment procedures at the commencement of each unit.

Units 3 and 4

School-assessed tasks, school-assessed coursework and an end-of-year examination.

• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 10 per cent • Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 10 per cent • Units 3 and 4 school-assessed task: 50 per cent • Units 3 and 4 examination: 30 per cent

Drama

This study provides students with the opportunity to examine and explore the ways in which drama gives form to, and makes meaning of, a range of social, political, cultural and historical contexts. It focuses on the development of expressive skills within dramatic structures and the development and performance of imagined characters, achieved through the refinement of skills, techniques and processes in the creation and presentation of dramatic works.

Unit 1: Dramatic Storytelling
This unit focuses on creating, presenting and analysing a devised performance that includes real or imagined characters, based on personal, cultural and/or community experiences and stories.

Unit 2: Creating Australian Drama
This unit focuses on the use and documentation of the processes involved in constructing a devised solo or ensemble performance. Students create, present and analyse a performance based on a person, an event, an issue, a place, an art work, a text and/or an icon from a contemporary or historical Australian context.

Unit 3: Ensemble Performance
This unit focuses on non-naturalistic drama from a diverse range of contemporary and/or cultural performance traditions. Non-naturalistic performance styles and associated theatrical conventions are explored in the creation, development and presentation of an ensemble performance. Collaboration to create, develop and present ensemble performance is central to this performance. Students use and manipulate dramatic elements, expressive skills and performance styles to enhance performance. They select stagecraft and theatrical conventions as appropriate to the performance. Students also document and evaluate stages involved in the creation, development and presentation of the ensemble performance.

Unit 4: Solo Performance
This unit focuses on the use of stimulus material and resources from a variety of sources to create and develop character/s within a solo performance. Students complete two solo performances. For a short solo performance they develop practical skills of researching, creating, presenting, documenting and analysing a solo performance work. In the development of a second solo performance, they devise, rehearse and perform an extended solo performance in response to a prescribed structure published by the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority. The processes involved in the creation and presentation of character/s in solo performance are analysed and evaluated.

Entry:
There are no prerequisites for entry to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4.

Assessment

Satisfactory Completion: Demonstrated achievement of outcomes specified for the unit.

LEVELS OF ACHIEVEMENT

Unit 1 and 2:
Students will be informed of the assessment procedures at the commencement of each unit.

Units 3 and 4 School-assessed coursework and two end-of year examinations.

• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 35 per cent • Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 5 per cent • Units 3 and 4 Written examination: 25 per cent • Unit 4 Performance examination: 35 per cent

English/ English as an Additional Language

English

The English language is central to the way in which students understand critique and appreciate their world and to the ways in which they participate socially, economically and culturally in Australian society. The study of English encourages the development of literate individuals capable of critical and imaginative thinking, aesthetic appreciation and creativity. Students will continue the learning established through the Victorian Essential Learning Standards (VELS) in the key discipline concepts of texts and language, and the dimensions of reading, writing, speaking and listening.

English as an Additional Language

The English as an Additional Language course is the equivalent of the VCE English course but students have the advantage of being taught in small groups by an EAL teacher. It is designed to give students whose first language is not English extra support in their VCE studies of English. Students further develop their ability to speak and write effectively for a range of purposes and audiences in a variety of ways.

English as an Additional Language is a course for students from non-English speaking backgrounds. In order to qualify for EAL, students have to satisfy both of the following conditions:

a) The student has been resident in Australia for a period not more than seven calendar years immediately prior to 1st of January of the year in which English Units 3 & 4 are undertaken and

b) English has been the student’s major language of instruction for a total period of no more than seven years prior to the commencement of the year in which English Units 3 & 4 are undertaken.

English/EAL Units 1 – 4

Unit 1

The focus of this unit is on the reading of a range of texts, particularly narrative and persuasive texts, in order to comprehend, appreciate and analyse the ways in which texts are constructed and interpreted. Students will develop competence and confidence in creating written, oral and multimodal texts. The term ‘set text’ refers to texts chosen by the school for the achievement of Outcomes 1 and 2.

Unit 2

The focus of this unit is on reading and responding to an expanded range of text types and genres in order to analyse ways in which they are constructed and interpreted, and on the development of competence and confidence in creating written, oral or multimodal texts. The term ‘set text’ refers to texts chosen by the school for the achievement of Outcomes 1 and 2.

Unit 3

The focus of this unit is on reading and responding both orally and in writing to a range of texts. Students analyse how the authors of texts create meaning and the different ways in which texts can be interpreted. They develop competence in creating written texts by exploring ideas suggested by their reading within the chosen Context, and the ability to explain choices they have made as authors.

Unit 4

The focus of this unit is on reading and responding in writing to a range of texts in order to analyse their construction and provide an interpretation. Students create written or multimodal texts suggested by their reading within the chosen Context and explain creative choices they have made as authors in relation to form, purpose, language, audience and context.

Entry: There are no prerequisites for entry to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4.

Assessment

Units 1 & 2 English/EAL

← Reading and responding ← Creating and presenting ← Using language to persuade ← End-of-semester exam ← End-of-year exam

Unit 3 & 4 English/EAL

← Reading and responding ← Creating and presenting ← Using language to persuade ← End-of-year exam

Satisfactory Completion: Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.

LEVELS OF ACHIEVEMENT

Units 1 and 2: Students will be informed of the assessment procedures at the commencement of each unit.

Units 3 and 4

The Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority will supervise the assessment of all students undertaking Units 3 and 4. In English/EAL the student’s level of achievement will be determined by school-assessed coursework and end-of-year examination. Percentage contributions to the study score in English/EAL are as follows:

← Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 25 per cent ← Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 25 per cent ← End-of-year examination: 50 per cent

Foundation English

Unit 1 & 2

The Foundation English course is designed for students who need additional time and assistance to strengthen and refine their literacy skills to support their study in VCE English Units 1 – 4 and in other VCE studies. The course will draw on and strengthen the knowledge and skills students have acquired about texts and language in previous English studies. Student selection for this course will be subject to consultation during the counselling process.

Assessment ← Reading and responding ← Creating and presenting ← Using language to persuade ← End-of-semester exam ← End-of-year exam

Food and Technology

Through the study of Food and Technology, students will develop knowledge of the functional, sensory, physical and chemical properties of food and will be able to apply this knowledge when using food in a practical situation. They will develop and apply the knowledge and skills for safe and hygienic work practices and food preparation techniques. They will use the design process, critical thinking and problem-solving skills to develop food products to suit specific situations or to meet the needs of individual consumers and their lifestyles. In this process, they will develop independent and cooperative learning skills.

Unit 1 – Food Safety and Properties of foods
Students develop an understanding of the work practices involved in preparing food hygienically to prevent food spoilage and food poisoning, and the principles of working safely when preparing food. They use tools and equipment to safely produce quality outcomes in food production.
Students develop an understanding of the classification of foods, and explore the properties of key foods. They use the design process to make foods suitable for a range of situations. Students investigate quality and ethical considerations such as fair trade and intensive farming practices.

Unit 2 – Planning and Preparation of Food
In this unit students investigate a range of tools, equipment and technological developments in order to produce foods. They examine the effects on the properties of foods when these tools are used.
Students look at the impact of social and cultural influences when planning meals, and develop the skills to produce, prepare and evaluate foods suitable for specific nutritional needs. Students apply their knowledge of the design process to plan, prepare and evaluate meals to meet design briefs for a range of contexts.

Unit 3 – Food preparation, processing and food controls
Students develop an understanding of the roles and responsibilities of and the relationship between the national, state and local authorities that govern food laws and standards to maintain food safety within Australia. They examine the causes of food poisoning and food spoilage and investigate how the HACCP system is used to ensure the safe production of food.
Students examine the primary and secondary processes applied to key foods and analyse the relationship between this and the properties of key foods. Students develop a range of food preparation and preservation techniques.
Students begin the School Assessed Task by developing and writing a design brief. They plan a series of food items based on their design brief and research the properties of the food items they intend to make.

Unit 4 – Food product development and emerging trends
Students develop individual plans for the items planned in Unit 3 Outcome 3. They make the items using their previously developed design plan, using a range of complex processes and decisions. Students then present and evaluate their food product. A folio of planning and processes is created in response to this process.
Students investigate sustainable farming and a range of environmental issues in food manufacturing. They investigate commercial food product development and explore the impact of technology on the development of new food products.

Entry:
There are no prerequisites for entry to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4.

Assessment

Satisfactory Completion: Demonstrated achievement of outcomes specified for the unit.

Levels of Achievement

Unit 1 and 2:
Students will be informed of the assessment procedures at the commencement of each unit.

Units 3 and 4

The Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority will supervise the assessment of all students undertaking Units 3 and 4. In Food and Technology the student’s level of achievement will be determined by school-assessed coursework, a school-assessed task and an end-of-year examination. Percentage contributions to the study score in Food and Technology are as follows:

• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 15 per cent

• Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 15 per cent

• Units 3 and 4 school-assessed task: 40 per cent

• End-of-year examination: 30 per cent

Health and Human Development

The study of Health and Human Development provides an opportunity for students to investigate health and human development issues across the lifespan. Students will develop the knowledge, attitudes, values and skills to become actively involved in shaping the influences that determine their own health and development, and the health of their local and global communities. The study also promotes the understanding that many factors, both inherited and environmental, play a major role in determining health and development; and that one of the most significant influences on health and development is nutrition. Promoting good nutrition enhances an individual’s quality of life as well as his or her physical, social, emotional and intellectual development. In addition, it contributes to the social and economic wellbeing of society.

Health is a dynamic quality that is influenced by a complex interrelationship between individuals and their physical, social, economic and political environments. This interrelationship is reflected in a social view of health which sees health as being created in the settings where people live and work. It recognises the need for personal skills development, the importance of empowering communities to take action to promote health, the creation of social and physical environments that are supportive of health, an awareness of the impacts on health of public policies and the need for health services to be oriented towards the prevention of ill health and health promotion.

Development is about change and is a lifelong process that begins at conception and continues until we die. Developmental changes are cumulative; development that occurs in the future is dependent upon development occurring in the past.

By understanding development and the inherited factors that determine development and the environmental influences that shape development, students are better equipped to critically evaluate policies and programs designed to promote health and development and understand choices that are consistent with better health outcomes.

The study of Health and Human Development is also based on the premise that health and development needs to be promoted at an individual level, and within group and community settings at national and international levels to truly maximise developmental potential. This underpins the structure of the four units of Health and Human Development.

Unit 1: Youth health and development

This unit focuses on the transition from childhood to adulthood and the enormous changes in physical, social, emotional and intellectual development that transition brings. Good health is seen as an important determinant for optimal development. Challenges related to the maintenance of optimum health and development for youth are explored, focusing on the inherited and environmental factors that influence the physical, social, emotional and intellectual changes that occur at this stage of life.

Unit 2: Individual and community health and development

In this unit there is a focus on the role that families, communities and governments play in optimising the health of individuals across the lifespan. There is an exploration of differences in health and developmental outcomes experienced by some social and cultural groups, despite relatively high levels of community and government involvement. There is a particular focus on indigenous, rural and remote communities and Australians from lower socio-economic backgrounds.

There is also an exploration of the requirements of optimal health and development throughout childhood and adulthood. Students will also examine the organisation and delivery of health care in Australia and evaluate its effectiveness in promoting health and development for all Australians.

Unit 3: Nutrition, health and development

Students will explore the diversity of health outcomes within our population that are the result of factors such as biology, socio-economic status, environment, inherited lifestyle, behaviour, knowledge, attitudes and beliefs. The role of nutrition in Australia’s health will be explored, including nutrition as a protective factor against a number of diseases across the lifespan. Government and non-government initiatives designed to promote health and development are also considered, with a focus on Australia’s health care system.

Unit 4: Global health and development

The unit focuses on the comparisons of Australia’s health to that of developing countries and the promotion of global health. There is an analysis of the impact of a range of environmental factors that contribute to variations in health and developmental outcomes both between and within industrialised and developing countries. This global comparison will enable students to evaluate the determinants of optimal health and development and the range of sustainable health care initiatives developed by governments and international agencies to optimise health and development globally.

Entry: There are no prerequisites for Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to Unit 4.

Assessment

Satisfactory Completion: Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.

LEVELS OF ACHIEVEMENT

Units 1 and 2:
Students will be informed of the assessment procedures at the commencement of each unit.

Units 3 and 4

• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 25 per cent

• Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 25 per cent

• End-of-year examination: 50 per cent.

History

History is the practice of understanding and making meaning of the past. It is also the study of the problems of establishing and representing that meaning. It is a synthesising discipline which draws upon most elements of knowledge and human experience. Students learn about their historical past, their shared history and the people, ideas and events that have created present societies and cultures. The study builds a conceptual and historical framework within which students can develop an understanding of the issues of their own time and place. It seeks to extend students’ cultural, economic, social and political understanding while developing analytical skills and using imagination.

Historical understanding is communicated through written, oral and visual forms. The analysis of written documentary evidence such as letters, diaries, court proceedings and government records has long been the foundation of the study. Visual evidence, however, often pre-dates written material, for example rock art, mosaics, scrolls. More recently, there have been many film and television documentaries presenting and interpreting historical events. It is therefore important in the study of history for students to develop the skills necessary to analyse visual, oral and written records.

The study of history draws links between contemporary society and its history, in terms of its social and political institutions, and language. An understanding of the link between accounts of the past, and the values and interests of the time in which the accounts were produced, is also a feature of the study of history. VCE History is relevant to students with a wide range of expectations, including those who wish to pursue formal study at tertiary level, as well as providing valuable knowledge and skills for an understanding of the underpinnings of contemporary society.

Structure

The study is made up of 12 units with the following being offered at Carwatha College P-12:

Unit 1 Twentieth century history 1900–1945

The first half of the twentieth century was marked by significant change. In this unit students consider the way that societies responded to these changes and how they affected people’s lives.

Unit 2: Twentieth century history 1945–2000

This unit considers some of the major themes and principal events of post–World War II history, and the ways in which individuals and communities responded to the political, economic, social and technological developments in domestic, regional and international settings.

Units 3 and 4: Revolutions

Students study the Russian and Chinese Revolutions, considering different historical perspectives. They study the reasons leading up to the revolution and the nature of the new society after the revolution.

Entry:
There are no prerequisites for entry to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4. There is no restriction on the number of histories a student may take.

Assessment

Satisfactory Completion: Achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.

LEVELS OF ACHIEVEMENT

Units 1 and 2: Students will be informed of the assessment procedures at the commencement of each unit.

Units 3 and 4

School-assessed coursework and an end-of-year examination.

• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 25 per cent

• Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 25 per cent

• Unit 3 and 4 examination: 50 per cent.

Information Technology

VCE Information Technology focuses on the processing of data and management of information and information systems. While it is important that students extend their use of ICT as a learning and personal tool, the study of VCE Information Technology encompasses information systems and the means by which needs of individuals, organisations, communities and society are met through the combination of ICT and meaningful information. VCE Information Technology equips students with appropriate knowledge and skills to use ICT responsibly and to make informed personal and workplace choices about developments in this exciting field. Students are encouraged to orient themselves towards the future, with an awareness of the technical and societal implications of ICT. VCE Information Technology provides pathways to further studies in IT and to careers in ICT-based areas. It also prepares students for programs that require an IT-related subject or for a range of careers that require efficient and effective use of ICT.

Structure: The study is made up of six units. Students concentrate on the use of industry-standard, commercial, computer software packages to produce and manage information.

Unit 1: Information Technology

This unit focuses on how individuals and organisations use, and can be affected by, information and communications technology (ICT) in their daily lives. In Areas of Study 1 and 3, students acquire and apply a range of knowledge and skills to manipulate different data types such as numeric, text, sound and images (still and moving) to create solutions that can be used to persuade, educate, inform and entertain. In Area of Study 3, students also explore how their lives are affected by ICT, and consider strategies for managing how ICT is applied. In Area of Study 2, students examine how networked information systems allow data to be exchanged locally and within a global environment, and explore how mobile devices, such as phones, are used within these networks.

Unit 2: Information Technology

This unit focuses on how individuals and organisations use ICT to meet a range of purposes. Students apply a range of knowledge and skills to create solutions, including those that have been produced using a programming or scripting language, to meet users’ needs. In this unit, students apply all stages of the problem-solving methodology when creating solutions. In Area of Study 1 students analyse data from large repositories and manipulate selected data to create visualisations. In Area of Study 2 students develop skills in using programming or scripting language software and they investigate careers that involve the use of these skills. Working in teams is an important and effective strategy for solving problems, and this strategy is applied in Area of Study 3 when students solve problems for clients in the community.

Unit 3: Information Technology Applications

The focus of Unit 3 is the World Wide Web and how it supports the information needs of individuals, communities and organisations. In Area of Study 1, students investigate the design and technical underpinnings of different types of websites that support the varying needs of online communities. Students use web authoring software to create prototype websites for particular online communities, taking into account both technical and non-technical constraints. Area of Study 2 focuses on the use of a relational database management system (RDBMS). Students examine techniques used by organisations to acquire data via websites and consider the relationship between how the data is acquired and the structure of an RDBMS. At the practical level, students acquire and apply knowledge and skills in the use of an RDBMS. In Unit 4 when solving information problems students can either use spreadsheet software or continue to use an RDBMS.

Unit 4: Information Technology Applications

In this unit students focus on how ICT is used by organisations to solve ongoing information problems and on the strategies used to protect the integrity and security of data and information. In Area of Study 1 either a relational database management system (RDBMS) or spreadsheet software is selected and used to create solutions to information problems. In addition, students use web authoring or multimedia authoring software to produce onscreen user documentation. When creating solutions to ongoing information problems, students apply all stages of the problem-solving methodology. In Area of Study 2, students explore how organisations manage the storage, communication and disposal of data and information in order to minimise threats to the integrity and security of data and information, and to optimise efficient information handling.

Unit 3: Software Development

Unit 3 focuses on programming as a strategy for solving problems for specific users in a networked environment. Students develop knowledge and skills in the use of a programming language. The programming language selected will be studied for both Units 3 and 4. When programming in Unit 3, students are expected to have an overview of the problem-solving methodology and a detailed understanding of the stages of analysis, design and development. Area of Study 1 focuses on the analysis stage of the problem-solving methodology, which involves students developing and applying knowledge and skills in determining the requirements of solutions, identifying relevant factors that should be taken into account when designing the solutions, and in scoping the solutions. In Area of Study 2 students engage in designing the detailed specifications of how solutions will be developed and undertake the development stage by using the selected programming language to create planned solutions.

Unit 4: Software Development

This unit focuses on how the information needs of individuals, organisations and society are and can be met through the creation of purpose-designed solutions in a networked environment. Students continue to study the programming language selected in Unit 3. In this unit students are required to engage in the design, development and evaluation stages of the problem-solving methodology. Area of Study 1 focuses on the design and development stages of the problem-solving methodology when solving problems suitable for use with mobile devices. Area of Study 2 focuses on the final stage of the methodology, evaluation.

Entry: No prerequisites for entry to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4

Assessment

Satisfactory completion: Achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit

LEVELS OF ACHIEVEMENT

Units 1 and 2:
Students will be informed of the procedures at the commencement of each unit.

Unit 3 and 4 Information Technology Applications and Software Development

School-assessed work and end-of-year examination

• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 25 per cent

• Unit 4 school assessed coursework: 25 per cent

• Unit 3and 4 examinations: 50 per cent.

LOTE (Languages other than English)

Students who wish to study a LOTE will need to do so through the Victorian School of Languages (VSL). The VSL runs classes in a wide variety of languages at a number of centres, including Carwatha College P-12, on Saturday mornings.

Another possibility is the Distance Education Centre (DEC). The DEC was formerly known as the Correspondence School. Students enrolled in the DEC submit their work by post or fax on a weekly basis. They are also required to attend one or two seminars throughout the year.

(Levies will be charged by VSL or Distance Education Centre)

Any queries should be directed to the Sub-School Leader Ms Apollonio, or the LOTE Coordinator, Ms Friend.

Legal Studies

This study is about the way the law relates to and serves both individuals and the community. It focuses on developing an understanding of the way in which law is generated, structured and operates in Australia.

Unit 1: Criminal Law in Action

Students examine the need for laws in society. They investigate the key features of criminal law, how it is enforced and adjudicated and possible outcomes and impacts of crime. Through a consideration of contemporary cases and issues, students learn about different types of crimes and explore rights and responsibilities under criminal law.

Unit 2: Issues in civil law

Students examine the rights that are protected by civil law, as well as obligations that laws impose. They investigate types of civil laws and related cases and issues and develop an appreciation of the role of civil law in society and how it affects them as individuals.

Unit 3: Law-making

In this unit students develop an understanding of the institutions that determine our laws, and their law-making powers and processes. They undertake an informed evaluation of the effectiveness of law-making bodies and examine the need for the law to keep up to date with changes in society.

Students develop an appreciation of the complex nature of law-making by investigating the key features and operation of parliament, and influences on law-making, with a focus on the role of the individual.

Students investigate the nature and importance of courts as law-makers and undertake an evaluation of their effectiveness as law-making bodies. They also investigate the relationships that exist between parliaments and courts.

Throughout this unit, students examine relevant cases to support their learning and apply legal principles to these cases.

Unit 4: Resolution and justice

Students examine the institutions that adjudicate criminal cases and civil disputes. They also investigate methods of dispute resolution that can be used as an alternative to civil litigation. Students investigate the processes and procedures followed in courtrooms and develop an understanding of the adversary system of trial and the jury system, as well as pre-trial and post-trial procedures that operate in the Victorian legal system. Using the elements of an effective legal system, students consider the extent to which court processes and procedures contribute to the effective operation of the legal system. They also consider reforms or changes that could further improve its effective operation.

Throughout this unit, students examine current or recent cases to support their learning, and apply legal principles to these illustrative cases.

Entry: There are no prerequisites for entry to Unit 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4.

Assessment
Satisfactory Completion: Achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.

Levels of Achievement

Units 1 and 2:
Students will be informed of the assessment procedures at the commencement of each unit.

Unit 3 and 4

School-assessed coursework and an end-of-year exam

• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 25 per cent

• Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 25 per cent

• Units 3 and 4 examination: 50 per cent.

Literature

Literature involves the study and enjoyment of a wide range of literary texts - classical, popular, traditional and modern. Its distinctive focus is on the use of language to illuminate and give insight into the nature of experience. Literature is an interactive study between the text, the social \political \economic context in which the text was produced, and the experience of life and of literature that the reader brings to the text.

Unit 1

This unit enables students to develop effective reading strategies, to examine the ideas and views of life which are presented in the literature studied and relate what they read to their own lives. The unit covers various kinds of literature with a special focus on modern texts.

Unit 2

This unit focuses on developing reading strategies and personal responses to literature, and to an understanding of how themes and ideas in texts relate to personal and social experiences. It covers a variety of literature with an emphasis on works from the past.

Units 3 and 4

The study of literature is a means of exploring human experience. It involves asking questions such as: whose experiences and what experiences are given voice in the text? How are they created through the text’s use of language and literary devices? What does the text’s representation of characters and events suggest about the values and views of the text? These units examine such questions and involve students in analysing a range of texts, developing skills in reading closely and critically, and discussing and debating various ways of interpreting and evaluating texts.

Assessment

Satisfactory completion: Achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.

LEVELS OF ACHIEVEMENT

Units 1 and 2

The individual school will determine levels of achievement.

Units 3 and 4

School assessed coursework and an end-of-year examination

• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 25 per cent

• Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 25 per cent

• Unit 3 and 4 examination: 50 percent.

Mathematics

Mathematics is the study of function and pattern in number, logic, space and structure. It provides both a framework for thinking and a means of symbolic communication that is powerful, logical, concise and unambiguous and a means by which people can understand and manage their environment. Essential mathematical activities include abstracting, providing, applying, investigating, modelling and problem solving.

This study is designed to provide access to worthwhile and challenging mathematical learning in a way which takes into account the needs and aspirations of a wide range of students. It is also designed to promote students’ awareness of the importance of mathematics in everyday life, in an increasingly technological society, and confidence in making effective use of mathematical ideas, techniques and processes.

All students in all the mathematical units offered will apply knowledge and skills, model, investigate and solve problems, and use technology to support learning mathematics and its application in different contexts.

Structure: The study is made up of the following units:

• Foundation Mathematics Units 1 and 2

• General Mathematics (Further) Units 1 and 2

• General Mathematics (Advanced) Units 1 and 2

• Mathematical Methods CAS Units 1 and 2

• Further Mathematics Units 3 and 4

• Mathematical Methods CAS Units 3 and 4

• Specialist Mathematics Units 3 and 4

There are a number of sequences of Mathematics within the Maths Learning Area. Although some variation within these sequences is possible, generally speaking, the following sequences are seen as catering for the majority of students choosing to study Maths.

Foundation Mathematics: Units 1 and 2

Foundation Mathematics provides for the continuing mathematical development of students entering VCE or VCAL, who need mathematical skills to support their other VCE, VCAL, or VET studies or future employment aspirations.

Foundation Mathematics does not prepare students for any Unit 3/4 Mathematics, and students undertaking Foundation Mathematics will not continue with Unit 3/4 Mathematics.

The areas of study are: Space; Shape and Design; Patterns and number; Handling data and Measurement.

General Mathematics (Further): Units 1 and 2

This course is designed for students who have satisfactorily completed Year 10 Core Maths and are considering studying Further Mathematics in Year 12. The areas of study are Statistics and Probability, Arithmetic, Functions and Graphs, Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry. The appropriate use of technology will be incorporated throughout the course.

Mathematical Methods CAS: Unit 1 and 2

These units are designed in particular as preparation for Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4. The areas of study for Unit 1 and Unit 2 are Functions and Graphs, Algebra, Calculus and Probability.

General Mathematics (Advanced): Units 1 and 2

This course is designed for students who intend to undertake Year 12 Maths Methods and Year 12 Specialist Maths or just Year 12 Maths Methods. Students doing General Maths (Advanced) should also be studying Maths Methods CAS Units 1 & 2. The areas of study are Kinematics, Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Vectors and Complex Numbers.

Further Mathematics: Units 3 and 4

Further Mathematics consists of a compulsory area of study, Data Analysis, and then a selection of three from six modules in the Applications area of study.

• Number patterns and applications • Geometry and trigonometry • Graphs and relations • Business related mathematics • Networks and decision mathematics • Matrices

Mathematical Methods CAS: Unit 3 and 4

Mathematical Methods Unit 3 and 4 consists of the following areas of study: Functions & Graphs, Algebra, Calculus and Probability which must be covered in a progression from Unit 3 to Unit 4 with an appropriate selection of content for each of Unit 3 and Unit 4.

Unit 3 and 4: Specialist Mathematics

Specialist Mathematics consists of the following areas of study: Functions, Relations & Graphs, Algebra, Calculus, Vectors and Mechanics. Students must be studying or have studied Maths Methods CAS Unit 3 and 4 to undertake this subject.

Use of Technology

The appropriate use of technology to support and develop the teaching and learning of mathematics will be incorporated throughout each unit and course. This will include the use of some of the following technologies for various areas of study or topics: CAS calculators; graphics calculators; spreadsheets; graphing packages; dynamic geometry systems; statistical analysis systems and computer algebra systems. In particular, students are encouraged to use graphics calculators, spreadsheets or statistical software for probability and statistics related areas of study, graphics calculators, dynamic geometry systems, graphing packages or computer algebra systems in the remaining areas of study systems, both in the learning of new material and the application of this material in a variety of different contexts.

Students must purchase the Casio Classpad CAS calculator for ALL MATHS SUBJECTS EXCLUDING foundation maths.

Entry

Students who enrol in Foundation Mathematics are expected to have completed Year 10 Everyday Mathematics, or Year 10 Core Mathematics.

Students who enrol for General Maths (Further) are advised to have satisfactorily completed Year 10 Core Mathematics or Year 10 Extension Mathematics.

Students who enrol for Maths Methods CAS 1 & 2 and General Maths (Advanced) 1 & 2 are expected to have achieved a satisfactory outcome in Year 10 Core or Extension Mathematics. This will ensure that students have a solid background to undertake these subjects.

Units 3 & 4 Further Mathematics assumes satisfactory completion of at least one of General Maths (Further), Maths Methods CAS 1 & 2 or General Maths (Advanced).

Units 3 & 4 Mathematics Methods CAS assumes satisfactory completion of Units 1 & 2 Mathematics Methods CAS and, preferably, Units 1 & 2 General Maths (Advanced).

Enrolment in Specialist Mathematics Units 3 & 4 assumes: • satisfactory completion of Units 1 & 2 Maths Methods CAS; and • Units 1 & 2 General Maths (Advanced); and • current enrolment in Units 3 & 4 Mathematics Methods CAS.

Assessment

Satisfactory Completion

The award of satisfactory completion for a unit is based on a decision that the student has demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.

Levels of Achievement

Units 1 and 2:
Students will be informed of the assessment procedures at the commencement of each unit.

Units 3 and 4

The VCAA will supervise the assessment of all students undertaking Units 3 and 4. The student’s level of achievement will be assessed through school-assessed coursework and examination as follows:

Further Mathematics

• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 20 per cent

• Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 14 per cent

• Unit 3 and 4 examination (Facts, skills and applications): 33 per cent

• Unit 3 and 4 examination (Analysis task): 33 per cent

Mathematical Methods

• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 20 per cent

• Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 14 per cent

• Unit 3 and 4 examination (Facts, skills and applications): 22 per cent

• Unit 3 and 4 examination (Analysis task): 44 per cent

Specialist Mathematics

• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 14 per cent

• Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 20 per cent

• Unit 3 and 4 examination (Facts, skills and applications): 22 per cent

• Unit 3 and 4 examination (Analysis task): 44 per cent

Media

The media is a diverse, dynamic and evolving collection of forms used to inform, communicate with and connect people. Media influence the way people spend their time, help shape the way they perceive themselves and others, and play a crucial role in the creation and exchange of personal, social, cultural, national and global identities. The media entertain, educate, inform and provide channels of communication. VCE Media examines media products as the expression of creative ideas, specific symbolic languages and discourses of society and culture that shape meaning and reflect the society in which they were created. This study explores a variety of media forms, including audio, audiovisual media, print-based media, digital and interactive media technologies and convergent media processes. Students examine and analyse the relationships between audiences and the media; this analysis is undertaken through a theoretical and practical study that places the student in the role of a media creator.

Unit 1: Representation and technologies of representation
In this unit students develop an understanding of the relationship between the media, technology and the representations present in media forms. They study the relationships between media technologies, audiences and society. Students develop practical and analytical skills, including an understanding of the contribution of codes and conventions to the creation of meaning in media products, the role and significance of selection processes in their construction, the role audiences play in constructing meaning from media representations, and the creative and cultural impact of new media technologies.

Unit 2: Media production and the media industry
In this unit students develop their understanding of the specialist production stages and roles within the collaborative organisation of media production. Students participate in specific stages of a media production, developing practical skills in their designated role. Students also develop an understanding of media industry issues and developments relating to production stages and roles and the broader framework within which Australian media organisations operate.

Unit 3: Narrative and media production design
In this unit students develop an understanding of film, television or radio drama production and story elements, and learn to recognise the role and significance of narrative organisation in fictional film, television or radio drama texts. Students examine how production and story elements work together to structure meaning in narratives to engage audiences. Students also develop practical skills through undertaking exercises related to aspects of the design and production process. They complete a media production design plan for a specific media form and audience. They present the relevant specifications as a written planning document, with visual representations that employ media planning conventions appropriate to the media form in which the student chooses to work.

Unit 4: Media: process, influence and society’s values
In this unit student’s further develop practical skills in the production of media products to realise the production design plan completed during Unit 3. Organisational and creative skills are refined and applied throughout each stage of the production process. Students analyse the relationship between media texts, social values and discourses in the media. The nature and extent of media influence, the relationship between the media, media audiences and media regulation are also critically analysed in this unit.

Entry: There are no prerequisites for entry to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4.

Assessment

Satisfactory Completion: Demonstrated achievement of outcomes specified for the unit.

LEVELS OF ACHIEVEMENT

Units 1 and 2: Students will be informed of the assessment procedures at the commencement of each unit.

Unit 3 and 4

School-assessed coursework, a school-assessed task and an end-of-year examination

• Unit 3 and Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 20 per cent

• Unit 3 and Unit 4 school-assessed task: 35 per cent

• Unit 3 and 4 examination: 45 per cent.
Physical Education

Physical Education examines the biological, social and cultural influences on performance and participation in physical activity. Theory and practice are integrated in this study which is approached through both the study of, and participation in, physical activity.

Unit 1: Bodies in motion

In this unit students explore how the body systems work together to produce movement and analyse this motion using biomechanical principles. They are introduced to the aerobic and anaerobic pathways utilised to provide the muscles with the energy required for movement and the basic characteristics of each pathway.

Unit 2: Sports coaching and physically active lifestyles

This unit explores a range of coaching practices and their contribution to effective coaching and improved performance of an athlete. The way in which a coach influences an athlete can have a significant effect on performance. The approach a coach uses, the methods applied and the skills used will have an impact on the degree of improvement experienced by an athlete.

Students are introduced to physical activity and the role it plays in the health and wellbeing of the population. They explore a range of factors that influence participation in regular physical activity, and collect data to identify perceived barriers and the ways in which these barriers can be overcome.

Unit 3: Physical activity participation and physiological performance

This unit introduces students to an understanding of physical activity and sedentary behaviour from a participatory and physiological perspective. Students apply various methods to assess physical activity and sedentary levels, and analyse the data in relation to adherence to the National Physical Activity Guidelines. Students study and apply the social-ecological model to identify a range of Australian strategies that are effective in promoting participation in some form of regular activity.

Students investigate the contribution of energy systems to performance in physical activity. In particular, they investigate the characteristics of each system and the interplay of the systems during physical activity. Students explore the multi-factorial causes of fatigue and consider different strategies used to delay and manage fatigue and to promote recovery.

Unit 4: Enhancing performance

Improvements in performance, in particular fitness, depend on the ability of the individual or coach to gain, apply and evaluate knowledge and understanding of training. Students undertake an activity analysis. Using the results of the analysis, they then investigate the required fitness components and participate in a training program designed to improve or maintain selected components. Athletes and coaches aim to continually improve and use nutritional, physiological and psychological strategies to gain advantage over the competition. Students learn to critically evaluate different techniques and practices that can be used to enhance performance, and look at the rationale for the banning or inclusion of various practices from sporting competition.

Entry: There are no prerequisites for entry to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4.

Assessment

Satisfactory Completion : Demonstrated achievement of outcomes specified for the unit.

LEVELS OF ACHIEVEMENT

Units 1 and 2: Students will be informed of the assessment procedures at the commencement of each unit.

Unit 3 and 4

School-assessed coursework and an end-of-year examination.

• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 25 per cent

• Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 25 per cent

• Units 3 and 4 examination: 50 per cent.

Physics

Physics is a theoretical and empirical science, which contributes to our understanding of the physical universe from the minute building blocks of matter to the unimaginably broad expanses of the Universe. This understanding has significance for the way we explore our place in the Universe.

Physics includes the use of theories and models, investigation of hypotheses, collection and analysis of data, drawing conclusions, and selection and use of a range of appropriate technologies and mathematical techniques. Knowledge in physics is gained through complex processes. For example, theories developed as a result of studying the ways that matter interacts with matter and the ways that light and matter mutually interact, have led to innovations in medicine, electronics, energy use, telecommunications and materials science.

This study design provides a curriculum that is interesting and challenging for students with a wide range of expectations, including students who are aiming for medical, engineering, technological and science-based careers.

Unit 1
This unit focuses on the study of physics as a human endeavour in which observations and ideas about the physical world are organised and explained. Conceptual models are introduced and used to describe and explain observed physical phenomena related to electricity, nuclear physics and radioactivity.

Unit 2

This unit focuses on ideas about energy transfers and transformations that are relevant to the study of motion. The application of mathematical models is used to explain phenomena related to movement and the wave-like properties of light.

Unit 3
This unit focuses on the technologies that underpin communications and transport with studies in motion in one and two dimensions and electronics and photonics. Motion in two dimensions is introduced and applied to moving objects on Earth and in space and used to analyse the motion of the Moon, the planets and satellites. Circuit models are applied to understand aspects of electricity and electronics, and the operation and use of photonic devices is explored.

Unit 4

This unit focuses on the development of models to explain complex interactions of light and matter. A field model of electromagnetism is applied to the generation, distribution and use of electric power. The detailed studies provide examples of innovative technologies used for research and communication.

Entry: Before entry into Units 1 and 2 Physics, students need to have completed a minimum of one of the preparatory Science units offered in Year 10. In view of the sequential nature of the study, it is necessary that students undertake Units 1 and 2 before Units 3 and 4. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to Unit 4.
Assessment

Satisfactory Completion: Achievement of the set outcomes as specified for the unit.

LEVELS OF ACHIEVEMENT

Units 1 and 2.

Students will be informed of the assessment procedure at the commencement of each unit.

Unit 3 and 4

School-assessed coursework and examination

• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 16 per cent

• Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 24 per cent

• End-of-year examination: 60 per cent

Psychology

Psychology is the study of the nature and development of mind and behaviour in both humans and animals, including the biological structures and processes that underpin and sustain both. Students can develop an understanding of themselves and their relationships with others and their society through the study of psychology.

This study aims to engage students in the study of human behaviour from biological, cognitive and social perspectives. Students are introduced to the variety of thinking and research approaches used in psychology and gain a broad perspective of the study as a science. Students apply the principles of scientific research to investigations of psychology. They propose and investigate hypotheses, collect and analyse data and draw conclusions, taking account of limitations. They relate inferences to current models and theories, and recognise the contribution to psychology of earlier models and theories. Students incorporate ethical principles in their research and identify and analyse research methods and their ethical implications.

Unit 1: Introduction to psychology

In this unit students are introduced to the development of psychology from its philosophical beginnings to a scientific study of the human mind and behaviour. Students explore the scope of psychology, its specialist disciplines such as neuropsychology, cognitive, social and human developmental psychology, and its fields of application. Students consider influences on perception and human behaviour from biological, behavioural, cognitive and socio-cultural perspectives. They examine the contribution classic and contemporary studies have made to the development of different psychological theories used to predict and explain the human mind, and behaviours associated with particular stages of development over a lifespan.

Unit 2: Self and Others

A person’s attitudes and behaviours affect the way they view themselves and the way they relate to others. Understanding what influences the formation of attitudes of individuals and behaviours of groups can inform and contribute to explanations of individual aggression or altruism, the positive and negative power of peer pressure and responses to group behaviour.

Differences between individuals can also be ascribed to differences in intelligence and personality, but conceptions of intelligence and personality and their methods of assessment are contested. Differences between individuals, groups and cultures can be analysed in varied ways through different psychological perspectives informed by both classic and contemporary theories.

Unit 3: The Conscious Self

This unit focuses on the study of the relationship between the brain and the mind through examining the basis of consciousness, behaviour, cognition and memory.

Students study the structure and functioning of the human brain and nervous system, and explore the nature of consciousness and altered states of consciousness including sleep.

The brain continually receives and processes vast amounts of information from its internal and external environment. Memory involves the selective retention and retrieval of this information and it plays an important role in determining behaviour. Students consider the function of the nervous system in memory and investigate the ways in which information is processed, stored and utilised. They apply different theories of memory and forgetting to their everyday learning experiences.

Unit 4: Brain, Behaviour and Experience

This unit focuses on the interrelationship between learning, the brain and its response to experiences, and behaviour. The overall quality of functioning of the brain depends on experience, and its plasticity means that different kinds of experience change and configure the brain in different ways. Students investigate learning as a mental process that leads to the acquisition of knowledge, development of new capacities and changed behaviours. Understanding the mechanisms of learning, the cognitive processes that affect readiness for learning and how people learn informs both personal and social issues.

Students build on their conceptual understanding of learning to consider it as one of several important facets involved in a biopsychosocial approach to the analysis of mental health and illness. They consider different concepts of normality, and learn to differentiate between normal responses such as stress to external stimuli, and mental disorders. Students use a biopsychosocial framework – a conceptual model which includes psychological and social factors in addition to biological factors in understanding a person’s mental state – to explore the nature of stress, simple phobia and a selected mental disorder. The intent of the study is not that of diagnosis and treatment but to explore causes of mental illness, avenues of assistance and factors that promote mental wellbeing.

Entry: There are no prerequisites for entry in Units1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4. However, students who enter the study at unit 3 may need to undertake preparatory work.
Assessment

Satisfactory Completion: Achievement of the set of outcomes specified in the unit.

LEVELS OF ACHIEVEMENT

Units 1 and 2: Students will be informed of the assessment procedures at the commencement of each unit.

Units 3 and 4

School-assessed coursework and examination

• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 20 per cent

• Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 20 per cent

• Unit 4 end-of-year examination: 60 per cent

Studio Arts

Studio Arts provides a framework for the establishment of effective art practices through an understanding and application of the process of design. The design process enables students to explore ideas and sources of inspiration, experiment with materials and techniques and practice specialised skills in a range of art forms. Students generate a range of directions and potential solutions and analyse and evaluate them before producing artworks. The theoretical component of the study informs students’ practice through an investigation of selected artworks, an examination of artists’ working methods and a study of professional practices and art industry issues.

Unit 1: Artistic inspiration and techniques

The focus of this unit is the use of sources of inspiration and ideas as the bases for artworks and the exploration of a wide range of materials and techniques as tools for translating ideas, observations and experiences into visual form. The application of materials and techniques and interpretation of sources of inspiration by artists from different times and locations is also examined.

Unit 2: Design exploration and concepts

The focus of this unit is to establish and use an effective design methodology for the production of design explorations and artworks. Students also develop skills in the analysis of artworks to understand how aesthetic qualities are created, ideas communicated and identifiable styles developed.

Unit 3: Studio production and professional art practices

The focus of this unit is the implementation of a design process leading to the production of a range of potential solutions. A work brief is initially prepared to set out the framework for the design process. Students also examine professional art practices in relation to particular art form(s) and the development of distinctive styles in artworks.

Unit 4: Studio production and art industry contexts

The focus of this unit is to produce a cohesive folio of finished art works developed from potential solutions generated in Unit 3. Visual and written documentation explaining how the potential solutions will be used to produce the folio of artworks is also prepared. Students also examine the presentation of artworks and current art industry issues, with reference to the exhibition, promotion and critique of art works.

An end of year examination is based on the theory topics covered.

Entry: there are no prerequisites for entry to Units 1,2 and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4.

Assessment

Satisfactory Completion: Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.

LEVELS OF ACHIEVEMENT

Units 1 and 2: Students will be informed of the assessment procedures at the commencement of each unit.

Unit 3 and 4

• Unit 3 school-assessed task: 33 per cent

• Unit 4 school-assessed task: 33 per cent

• End-of-year examination: 34 per cent.

Visual Communication and Design

This study is intended to assist students in the understanding, production and interpretation of a range of visual communications. It involves a study of the vocabulary and grammar of visual communication, which includes an understanding of, and application of, drawing and drawing conventions, design elements, principles and design process in visual communication. The study also provides the opportunity to develop an informed, critical and discriminating approach to visual communications encountered in everyday life.

Unit 1: Visual communication

The main purpose of this unit is to enable students to prepare instrumental drawings of objects and explore freehand drawing from direct observation. Students also experiment and explore the application of design elements and principles in the preparation of solutions to suit specific purposes. Students study how the design process is applied in the production of visual communications.

Unit 2: Communication in context

The main purpose of this unit is to enable students to develop practical skills by generating images and developing them through freehand and instrumental drawing. The ways in which information and ideas are communicated visually are also explored through the analysis of the work of others. The design process is applied in developing visual communication solutions to set tasks.

Unit 3: Visual communication practices

The main purpose of this unit is to enable students to produce visual communications through the application of the design process to satisfy specific communication needs. Students also study the production of visual communications in a professional setting, and evaluate examples of visual communications.

Unit 4: Designing to a brief

The main purpose of this unit is to enable students to prepare one brief that defines the need or needs of a client. Students apply the design process to produce developmental work and two final presentations based on the brief.

Entry: There are no prerequisites for entry to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4.

Assessment

Satisfactory Completion: Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.

LEVELS OF ACHIEVEMENT

Units 1 and 2: Students will be informed of the assessment procedures at the commencement of each unit.

Units 3 and 4

• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 20 per cent

• Unit 4 school-assessed task: 5 per cent

• Units 3 and 4 examination: 35 per cent.

• School Assess Task (SAT) 40 per cent

VCAL Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning

The Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL) is a 'hands on' option for students in Years 11 and 12. The VCAL's flexibility enables students to design a study program that suits their interests and learning needs. Students select accredited VCE and Vocational Education and Training (VET) modules and units from the following four compulsory strands:
• Literacy and Numeracy Skills
• Work Related Skills
• Industry Specific Skills
• Personal Development Skills

At Carwatha College P-12, VCAL students are involved in a curriculum that integrates the four compulsory strands. They complete a range of projects designed to teach them ‘hands-on’ skills.

On successful completion, students will receive a VCAL certificate and a statement of results that details areas of completed study.

At Carwatha College P-12, the two levels of VCAL offered are Intermediate and Senior. We anticipate students commencing at the Intermediate level.

Students are able to gain recognition and credit for part-time work while enrolled in the VCAL. This work can include: • School Based Apprenticeship or Traineeship • Part-time Work • Work Placements

Students who elect to complete the Victorian
Certificate of Applied Learning at Carwatha College P-12 are matched to one of the two award levels - Intermediate or Senior, according to their level of competency in a range of skill areas • each VCAL level requires a minimum of ten credit points from across five compulsory curriculum areas (so students must pass all 10 units to receive their certificate) • each certificate is generally completed in one year so a two year program would consist of:

Program: Yr 11 - VCAL Intermediate and Yr 12
VCAL Senior Students who enrol in the Intermediate Level VCAL (Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning) will be enrolled in a standard program which involves:

• three days a week in the classroom studying Literacy, Numeracy, Work Related Skills and Personal Development Skills • one day a week in their Vocational Education and Training (VET) program • one day a week at the workplace

Students who enrol in the Senior Level VCAL
(Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning) will be enrolled in a standard program but at a more advanced level than Intermediate. The Senior Level program also involves:

• three days a week in the classroom studying • Literacy, Numeracy, Work Related Skills and • Personal Development Skills • one day a week in their Vocational Education and Training (VET) program • one day a week at the workplace • Selection into the VCAL program is by negotiation with the VCE and VCAL Coordinator.

VETis Vocational Education and Training in Schools Program

What is a VETis program?
A traditional academic program in Years 11 and 12 does not suit all students. Senior studies programs now cater for a larger and more varied group of students who have a wide range of abilities, interests and career pathways in mind.

Some students wish to pursue tertiary study at
University or TAFE, while others are keen to obtain skills and training, which prepare them directly for work.

The advantages of undertaking vocational education programs: • Acquire additional work skills • Develop self confidence and maturity • Enhance career prospects by providing pathways to tertiary study • Increases opportunities to participate in vocational education and training during secondary schooling • Provides students with a broader range of studies to meet their individual needs • Allows exploration of the workplace • Allows for credit into TAFE courses which reduces the time for completion of a TAFE qualification • Acquire skills which are practical, current and relevant to employers • Reinforces VCE studies by providing complimentary VET studies • Keeps employment and study options flexible • Responds to the needs of industry by helping to “skill up” the workforce of the future

VET in Schools (VETis) programs have been designed to provide a more vocational VCE, to expand opportunities for senior secondary students, to link schools to industry and to prepare young people for the workplace of the future.
VET programs are being fully integrated into the VCE. This means that they stand as independent studies at Units 1, 2, 3 and 4 levels. Students will be able to include a VET Unit 3 and 4 sequence as one of three studies other than English needed to gain their VCE. Vet provides additional breadth to the VCE and gives students a nationally recognised training credential endorsed by industry.

All VET programs include a period of industrial experience which is an opportunity to learn more about the industry and the skills required. Be aware that VET classes usually take place on a Wednesday and students will miss up to 4 timetabled classes at the College – students are expected to catch up on the work missed. Students have study periods to catch up on missed work.

VET in Schools Programs (VETis) provide students with: • A Victorian Certificate of Education • An enhanced Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR) • A VET in schools certificate • A statement of results listing all VET modules to be completed • Unit equivalence with VCE subjects

Types of Vocational Programs
VET in the VCE and VCAL
VET (Vocational Education and Training) within a school program combines traditional VCE or VCAL studies with vocational training and experience in the workplace. Successful completion of a VET program provides students with: • a Certificate II or III • credits towards the VCE or VCAL • structured workplace learning • a direct contribution towards their ATAR score or an increment towards their score
VETis COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

|PROGRAMS ARE OFFERED BY CARWATHA COLLEGE P-12 BUT DELIVERED |
|ELSEWHERE |

Notes:

• these count as both VCE and VCAL units, unless marked as VCAL only or as Pathway courses; • these courses will operate mostly on Wednesdays at either a local Secondary College or a local TAFE college.

Most of the courses involve a materials cost. Materials costs vary considerably and a $200 deposit is required with each application. The balance of the material cost (if required) will need to be paid by 1st December 2012.

• If the deposit is not paid with the application, then the application will not be processed.

• If you are facing financial difficulties and cannot pay the deposit immediately, then please make an appointment with the Student Welling Co-ordinator to discuss your situation.

• The full materials cost of the course will need to be paid by 1st December or your son/daughter will be withdrawn from his/her course.

• Please note also that some courses may not proceed in 2013 if there are insufficient numbers of students or if further funding changes occur.

If you are interested in any of the courses you should:

• Include the chosen course on your subject selection sheet. • Complete a SELLEN, or Holmesglen etc. application form. • Note that you need a $200 deposit to be paid at the time of your course counselling interview (on August 27th) is less than $200 for the year, the balance will be refunded to you. • All materials costs are for 1 year only.

There is no guarantee that you will be automatically enrolled. Most courses have a selection process that you will need to go through.

Certificate II in Applied Fashion Design & Technology (2 Years)

Held at: Berwick Secondary College

This course provides basic training to enable students to draft clothing patterns. It aims to provide employment pathways in clothing. Studio Arts Units 1 and 2 are recommended.

Certificate II in Automotive Technology Studies (2 Years)

Held at: Link Employment & Training-Dandenong

Berwick Secondary College (1 year only)

Chisholm Institute (Dandenong or Frankston)

Hallam Senior College

Modules include lubrication services, transmissions, fuel systems and vehicle detailing. Leather boots and overalls required.

Certificate II in Automotive Technology (Panel and Paint) (2 Years)

Held at : Chisholm Institute (Dandenong)

This course provides a pathway into panel beating. Units may include repairing body panels, applying vehicle paint and welding.

Certificate III in Beauty (2 Years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Berwick, Dandenong or Frankston)

This course is designed for students interested in working as a beautician, beauty therapist or nail technician.

Certificate II in Building and Construction -Bricklaying (partial completion) (2 Years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Berwick)

This course covers approx two thirds of the brick laying pre –apprenticeship. Units include building structures, bricklaying, scaffolding and levelling.

Certificate II in Building & Construction - Carpentry (partial completion) (2 Yrs)

Held at: Chisholm Institute-Dandenong, Frankston, Berwick

Link Employment & Training-Dandenong

Hallam Senior College

This course provides students with knowledge and skills for employment in the building and construction industry. Modules include levelling, use of power tools, scaffolding and floor / wall / roof framing.

Certificate II in Business Office Administration

Held at: Keysborough College – (Banksia) (2 years)

Noble Park Sec .College (2 years)

Dandenong High School (2 year)

Narre C.L.C. (1 year)

This course teaches office skills and is designed for students looking for a career in either clerical or receptionist positions.

Accounting 1&2 and Information Technology are recommended.

Certificate III in Children’s Services (2 Years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Berwick or Frankston)

Narre C.L.C. VCAL only

This course gives a basic training in competencies for working in childcare in a range of children’s services. It is designed for people wanting to work in a childcare centre, out of hours care or family day care centre.

CISCO / Certificate IV in Shared Technology (partial completion) (2years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Berwick or Frankston), Keysborough College

Certificate II in Civil Construction (2 years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Cranbourne)

This course is for students who may be interested in working on larger civil construction projects as a worker or plant operator.

Certificate II Community Services (2 Years)

Held at: Chisholm (Berwick, Dandenong or Cranbourne)

Narre C.L.C.

This program provides a step for courses in welfare and residential services, social work and youth work.

Certificate II in Conservation & Land Management. (2 Years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Cranbourne)

This course teaches skills in conservation and land management. Units include maintaining wildlife habitat and carrying out natural restoration works.

Certificate II in Computer Assembly and Repair (partial completion) 1 year

Held at: Chisholm (Berwick and Frankston)

This course involves hands on building, maintaining and trouble shooting of basic PC assembly and repair.

Certificate II in Dance (2 years)

Held at Hallam Senior College

Dandenong High School

Kambrya College (1 year only)

This course aims to provide students with the technical and performance skills to being the process of establishing a career in the entertainment industry. Modules include performance psychology, dance anatomy, physiology and exercise and dance techniques.

Certificate II in Integrated Technology– Electronics (2 Years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Berwick, Dandenong & Frankston)

Hallam Senior College

This course provides entry level skills for a career in electronics. Modules include assembly techniques, analogue systems, digital systems and electronic hand soldering.

Subjects needed to accompany - Info. Tech. 1&2, Gen. Maths or Maths Methods 1&2 and either Bus. Man.1 & 2, or Physics 1 & 2.

Certificate II in Electrotechnology – Career Start Electrical (2 Years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Dandenong, Frankston and Berwick)

This course is similar to the above course, but it is better suited to students wishing to become electricians. Modules include wireless communication, photonics, computer system networks and robotics.

Certificate II in Engineering (Welding and Fabrication) (Pathways/Partial Completion) 1 year

Held at: Chisholm Institute-Dandenong and Frankston

This program gives students basic skills in welding and fabrication. Different types of welding, thermal cutting and sheet/plate assembly are covered.

Certificate II in Engineering Studies (2 Years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Dandenong & Frankston)

This course covers the basics of the Engineering industry. Modules include machining, welding and thermal cutting, computing in engineering, electrical fundamentals and fabrication techniques.

Certificate II in Equine Industry (2 Years)

Held at: Hillcrest Christian College

National Centre for Equine Industry

Modules include horse care, horse riding, handling horses safely and preparing for competition.

Certificate II in Financial Services (2 Years)

Held at: Keysborough College – (Banksia)

This course aims to develop the general financial knowledge and skills of students. Modules include monitoring accounts and daily business records.

Certificate II in Furniture Making (Partial completion) 2 years

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Frankston and Dandenong)

Hallam Senior College

Involves furniture making skills and contains units from the pre-apprenticeship in cabinet making.

Hairdressing (Pathways) (1 Year)

Held at: Chisholm (Dandenong, Berwick & Frankston) VCAL only

Headmasters (City) VCAL only

Hallam Senior College

Narre C.L.C.

Provides an introduction to the skills of hairdressing. Modules include prepare clients for salon services and apply temporary colour and dry hair to shape.

Health & Support Services (2 years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Berwick or Frankston)

This program aims to develop skills in student who want to work in health services such as home and community care, mental health, massage therapy and allied health assistance.

Certificate II in Horticulture (Landscape) (2 Years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Cranbourne)

This course provides an insight into landscaping and horticulture. Leather boots and overalls required.

Certificate II in Horticulture (Parks & Gardens) (2 Years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Cranbourne)

This course provides a basic introduction to horticulture, landscaping and retail skills in the industry. Leather boots and overalls required.

Certificate II in Hospitality (Kitchen Operations (2 Years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Dandenong and Frankston)

Hampton Park Secondary College (1st Year Only)

Keysborough College

St. John’s Regional College (Dandenong)

Hallam Senior College

This course covers a variety of skills to do with cooking and serving both food and beverages.

Certificate II in Hospitality (Patisserie) (2 years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Dandenong)

St John’s Regional College (Dandenong)

Certificate III in Information Technology (Games Creation) 2 years

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Dandenong and Frankston)

This course will cover basic computer hardware, OH&S, digital imaging and building a gaming website through use of HTML.

Certificate IV in Justice (2 Years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Frankston and Dandenong)

This course aims to provide training for students wishing to work in the community justice or legal fields. Units include work in a legal environment and introduction to the Criminal Justice System.

Certificate III in Laboratory Skills (2 Years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Frankston)

Covers skills in aspects of laboratory operations.

Landscape (Pathways) (1 Year)

Held at: Holmesglen (Waverley)

Provides an introduction to different components of the landscape trade.

Certificate II in Live Theatre Production and Events (1 Year)

Held at: Hallam Senior College

This course aims to introduce students to theatrical performance. Modules include lighting, audio and staging.

Certificate III in Media (Interactive Digital Media) (2 Years)

Held at: Keysborough College – (Heatherhill)

Hallam Senior College

Chisholm Institute (Dandenong)

This course is designed for students who want to work in the multimedia industry doing tasks such as updating web pages, animation, capturing & manipulating images and video production.

Certificate II / III in Music Industry Skills (2 Years)

Held at: Hallam Senior College

Narre Warren South P-12

Keysborough College (Acacia)

The main aim of the course is to provide students with the skills for entry level into the music industry. Modules include song writing, multi track recording and creating a music video.

Students may choose to do only the first year (Year 11) course, which will give them Cert II in Music Industry Skills.

Certificate II in Plumbing (2 Years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Berwick, Dandenong or Frankston)

Modules include the basic skills associated with the Plumbing Trade.

Certificate II in Residential Drafting (Partial Completion) (2 Years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Frankston)

This course is for students interested in building design architecture. Students will produce technical drawings using CAD software.

Certificate II in Retail operations (1 year) (VCAL Only - Pathways)

Held at: Narre Community Learning Centre-Friday

Students will need to do at least 200 hours in the workplace during the year. This course provides skills for working in the retail industry.

Certificate II in Retail Make up and Skin Care (1 year)

Held at: Hallam Senior College

Chisholm Institute (Dandenong and Frankston)

This program aims to introduce students to the retail cosmetics industry, selling products such as skin care and makeup.

Certificate II in Sport and Recreation. (2 Years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Berwick, Dandenong & Frankston) (2 Years)

Noble Park SC (Rugby Specialist Program) 1 year

This course teaches skills and knowledge required for an assistant level employee at an aquatic centre, gymnasium or fitness centre. Modules include working effectively in a sport & rec. organization, assisting in preparing a sport & rec. session and assisting with recreation games.

Certificate II in Sustainable Energy (Career Start) (2 Years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Berwick)

This course looks at sustainable energy solutions in the workplace, daily activities and building design.

Certificate III in Tourism and Certificate III in Events (2 Years)

Held at: Chisholm Institute (Dandenong and Frankston)

This course has units from tourism, hospitality and events management.

Certificate II in Telecommunications – Cabling (2 years)

Held at: Chisholm (Frankston)

This course provides a pathway to other communication qualifications. It focuses on a variety of technologies including telecommunication cabling and an introduction to optical fibre.

Appendix

|Course Selection Form for Year 10, 2013 |Page 76 |
|Application for completion of VCE Unit 1 and 2 |Pages 77 and 78 |
|Vocational Pathways Application Form |Pages 79, 80, 81 |
|Application Details | |
|Subject Selection | |
|VCE Course Selection Form for Year 11, 2013 |Page 82 & 83 |
|Application to Study a Unit 3 and 4 Subject in Year 11 |Page 84 |
|VCE Course Selection Form for Year 12, 2013 |Page 85 |
|VCAL Course Selection Form for 11, 2013 |Page 86 |
|VCAL Course Selection Form for 12, 2013 |Page 87 |
|Application to Undertake a VETis Program |Page 88 |

Course Selection Form for Year 10, 2014 Last Name:_______________________________ First Name:__________________

Possible Career: ____________________________Home Group in 2013_______________

| |
|Reading |Writing |Language |Numeracy calculator|Numeracy non |
| | |conventions | |calculator |
| | | | | |

1. Year 10 Exam Result SEM 1

|English | | | | |
| | | | | |

2. Please provide a copy of your SEM 1 AUSVELS progression point summary.

Part B

You are required to speak to the teacher of this subject in 2013 to ensure that you understand the requirements that need to be met.

I have spoken to the above named student and outlined the requirements of the course.

Teacher signature:______________________________________ Date:______________

Part C
This section requires your parent’s approval and your commitment.

1. I understand that my son/daughter, ______________________________ is applying to enrol in a Unit 1 and 2 Area of Study.

Parent name:___________________________________________

Parent signature:________________________________________

2. I, _____________________________________, am applying to enrol in a Unit 1 and 2 Area of Study. I understand the commitment I am making to maintain an outstanding attendance record and ensure that I apply myself to my best ability in my work.

Student name:___________________________________________

Student signature:________________________________________

Vocational Pathways Application Form

In order to apply for this program these forms needs to be completed. No application will be accepted if there are missing forms or incomplete information. If you have any questions with regards to the completion of this form please contact the Sub School Leader prior to the submission date.

Student Name_____________________________________________________

Form: 9A 9B 9C 9D 9E

Parent/Guardian Name _____________________________________________

Parent Contact Phone Number ______________________________________

Maths Teachers Name: _____________________________

English Teachers Name:_____________________________

I, ______________________________________, and my parents/guardians know that by enrolling

in this course I am committing to the following outcomes and responsibilities;

• Organisation of work experience and Try a Trade, TAFE Taster at Chisholm TAFE • Transport to or from work experience and TAFE placement • Attendance at course expo and subject excursions • Completion of subject assessment tasks • Participation in all lessons

By signing this application indicates that that my parents/guardians and I are aware that there are costs associated with this course and these costs will be required to be paid prior to beginning the course.

Student signature:__________________________________________

Parent Signature:___________________________________________

Date:_____________________________________________________

Application Details

Name: ________________________________________________

To assist your teachers and the Pathways Team please answer the following:

1. What pathway options are you interested in? (tick more than one option if necessary)

VCE VCAL VET TAFE Apprenticeship

Seek full time employment

2. What work experience would you be interested in organising (Tick more than one option if necessary)

|Building and construction |Carpenter work |Painter |Plumber |
|Administration |Hospitality |Hair dresser |Make up and beauty |
|Aged Care/Welfare |Sales |Sport and recreation |Animal care |

If an area of interest is not listed place write here:

___________________________________________________________________

3. Do you have contacts that will support you to organise your work placement?

Yes No Please write the details if you know them:

___________________________________________________________________

4. What area(s) of interest would you be looking at for your TAFE course

___________________________________________________________________________

5. What would be your top three qualities which will support you during this course?

Organised Responsible Effective communicator Punctual Respectful Resourceful Reliable Independent Motivated

Subject Selection Form

Students will be required to undertake the following subject selections:

|Foundation English 2 units |Everyday Maths 2 units |
|Personal Development Skills Units 1 units |Work Education 1 unit |
|Other 4 units |Units for the Year 10 |

If you are interested in the Vocational Pathway please complete the subject selection form below

………………………………………………………………………………............................................……….

Subject Selection - Vocational Pathway 2014

Student Name……………………………………………… Current Home Group: ……….

Possible Career………………………………………………………………………

Course Selection:

List below in order of preference the subjects you would like to undertake in 2014.

|1. |2. |
|3. |4. |
|5. |6. |
|7. | |

Signatures:

Parent ………………………………......................…. Student ……………………………................…….

Sub School Leader ……………………….....................………….

|VCE Course Selection Form - Year 11 2014 |
|(This form must be submitted at your interview on Tuesday 3rd September 2013) |

NAME: ………………………………….… HOME GROUP: ….…… TELEPHONE NO: ……………………..

A. Do you expect to attend Carwatha College P-12 in 2014 ? Yes No

B. If your answer is ‘YES’, or you are unsure, you MUST complete the rest of this form.

a. Have you checked for any pre-requisites or recommended subjects for possible Tertiary courses? Yes No

b. Do you plan to study a LOTE in 2014? Yes No

c. Are you undertaking a VETiS course in 2014/2015? Yes No

If ‘Yes’, Name of Course: ……………………………………………………

d. Did you study a VCE subject in Year 10? Yes No

If ‘Yes’ which subject/s and Unit/s?........................................................................

A VCE PROGRAM REQUIRES:
4 Units of English, and at least 20 units over the 2 years (10 in Year 11 and 10 in Year 12). These 20 units may include a VETiS course. Year 11 students may study one Unit 3-4 subject, subject to the approval of the Year 11 & 12 Sub-School Leader and Co-ordinators

VCE PROGRAM PLANNING CHART

See next page

|Course Selection Sheet for 2014 |

Name_______________________________________ Are you eligible to study VCE English as an Additional Language (EAL) in 2014? ______ (yes/no)

Each column (block) must be filled in according to your preference (1 = first choice – 5 = last choice)

Units 1 and 2 (Year 11 subjects)
|Block A |

Year 11 students are offered the opportunity to study a Unit 3 and Unit 4 subject in Year 11. Although there are some advantages in doing so, students should be realistic about their abilities before making such a decision.

To assist in this process, students are required to talk to relevant teachers and obtain their signatures before submitting this application on Course Counselling Day on the Tuesday 3rd September, 2013.

Detailed below is the policy regarding Year 11 students:

Policy regarding Year 11 students studying Units 3 and 4 subject

• Students are encouraged to study a Unit 3 and 4 subject in Year 11, if they meet to eligibility requirements

• It will only be in exceptional circumstances that students will be permitted to study more than one Unit 3 and 4 subject in Year 11

• Priority for places in Unit 3 and 4 subjects will be given to students in Year 12

• All students are required to do 5 subjects at Year 11 and Year 12

STUDENT’S NAME: ______________________________ FORM: ______________________

NAME OF UNIT 3 & 4 SUBJECT YOU WISH TO STUDY: _____________________________________

I believe this student has the potential to successfully complete the chosen Year 12 subject in 2013.

Signed:__________________________________________________

SIGNATURE OF ONE OF YOUR CURRENT TEACHERS, IN A SIMILAR SUBJECT (if possible):

STUDENT’S SIGNATURE:_______________________________________________________

PARENT/GUARDIAN SIGNATURE:________________________________________________

|VCE Course Selection Form - Year 12 2014 |
|(This form must be submitted Friday 13th September 2013.) |

NAME: ………………………………….… FORM: ………..… TELEPHONE NO: ……………………………

A. Do you expect to attend Carwatha College P-12 in 2014? Yes No
B. If your answer is ‘YES’, or you are unsure, you MUST complete the rest of this form.

Proposed Careers:1. ……………………………… 2. ………………………………..

Have you checked for any pre-requisites or recommended subjects for possible Tertiary courses? Yes No

C. VCE PROGRAM REQUIRES: 4 Units of English, and at least 20 units over the 2 years (10 in Year 11 and 10 in Year 12). These 20 units may include a VETiS course.

VCE PROGRAM PLANNING CHART

Are you eligible to study VCE English as an Additional Language (EAL) in 2014? ______ (yes/no)

Each column (block) must be filled in according to your preference (1 = first choice – 5 = last choice)

|Block A | |Block B |

Have you checked for prerequisites / recommended subjects for TAFE / Apprenticeship / Work Placement.

|YES - list these requirements |NO |
| | |

A VCAL Program Requires a TOTAL of 10 Units including at least

|One Literacy Unit |One Work Related Skills Unit |One Industry Specific Skills Unit |
|One Numeracy Unit |One Personal Development Skills Unit | |

Year 11 students are also asked to indicate their intentions for 2015 (where possible)

|VCE |VCAL |TAFE |
|Apprenticeship |Work Placement |Other (specify) |

Vet Course

|Name of VETiS course: |Forms completed and submitted to Pathways Manager? (Yes/No) |
|Student’s Signature |Parent’s Signature |
|Approved by: |
|Sub-School Leader/VCAL Co-ordinator |

[pic]VCAL - Course Selection Form – Year 12 2014 This form must be submitted at your interview on Friday 13th September 2013.

NAME: ………………………………….… FORM: ………..… TELEPHONE NO: ……………………………

A. Do you expect to attend Carwatha College P-12 in 2014? Yes No

B. Do you plan to enrol in a VCAL course in 2014? Yes No

If your Answer is YES to both of the above, or you are unsure, you must complete the rest of this form.

|Proposed Careers | | |

Have you checked for prerequisites / recommended subjects for TAFE / Apprenticeship / Work Placement.

|YES - list these requirements |NO |
| | |

A VCAL Program Requires a TOTAL of 10 Units including At Least

|One Literacy Unit |One Work Related Skills Unit |One Industry Specific Skills Unit |
|One Numeracy Unit |One Personal Development Skills Unit | |

Vet Course

|Name of VETiS course: |Forms completed and submitted to Pathways Manager? (Yes/No) |
|Student’s Signature |Parent’s Signature |
|Approved by: |
|Sub-School Leader/VCAL Co-ordinator |

|2014 VETiS SELLEN APPLICATION FORM |

First Name: ________________ Surname: ________________ ( Female ( Male

Form:___________ Date of Birth ___/___/19_____

Address:__________________________________________ Postcode: ____________

Phone: _______________________ Mobile __________________________

Email Address: ______________________________________

Do you intend to do? ( VCE ( VCAL

Name of Parent / Guardian: ________________________________________________

Work Phone:_____________ Mobile _______________ Emergency: _____________

Email Address: ______________________________________

Signature of Parent / Guardian _________________________________

I wish to apply for:

FIRST PREFERENCE Name of Program: _______________________________________

Being delivered at: _______________________________________

( First Year ( Second Year

SECOND PREFERENCE Name of Program: _____________________________________

Being delivered at: _______________________________________

( First Year ( Second Year

Please note:

• A $200 deposit needs to accompany this application. • Closing date is 3rd Sept. (Year 10 to 11) or 13th Sept. (Year 11 to 12). • The full cost of the course needs to be paid by the start of December.

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