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Malaria Issue Report

In: Science

Submitted By sarra123
Words 2457
Pages 10
Issue Report: Malaria
The abstract:
This report will be exploring the cause of malaria, the symptoms that occur in infected people and the many treatments being tested and used to treat the disease of malaria.
Malaria is a disease caused by an infection of the red blood cells with a tiny organism called protozoa. There are four different types of species of the malaria protozoa (Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium ovale and Plasmodium malariae) and each has a slightly different effect on the body. These organisms are carried from person to person by the main mosquito called Anopheles. When it bites an infected person, the mosquito sucks up blood containing the parasite, which may then be passed on to someone else when a mosquito bites them. ‘It is estimated that 300 to 500 million malaria infections occur annually and 90% of these are in the sub-Saharan Africa’. [8]
The problem:
Malaria is a biological problem because it affects the body, this could be through having various symptoms such as shivering and vomiting or it could result in problems with people’s red blood cells and cause them to be fragile and not functioning properly. The problem of contracting malaria is finding a cure for it or finding the right treatment to treat the infected person. At the moment biologists are trying to find a cure that will effectively work within the body and invent a new vaccine that helps boosts people’s immune systems so that they respond effectively to the treatment in order to treat the disease.

The biology behind the report: [1]

This picture shows the stages in which a person goes through if they have been bit with a female anopheles. This diagram shows that there are seven stages to this disease affecting the body.

At stage one a female anopheles mosquito carries the malaria parasite and bites an uninfected human. As the mosquito sucks...

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