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Managing Customer Lifetime Value at Ibm

In: Business and Management

Submitted By Samy2
Words 11931
Pages 48
Vol. 27, No. 4, July–August 2008, pp. 585–599 issn 0732-2399 eissn 1526-548X 08 2704 0585

informs

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doi 10.1287/mksc.1070.0319 © 2008 INFORMS

Practice Prize Report

The Power of CLV: Managing Customer Lifetime Value at IBM
J. Mack Robinson College of Business, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303, dr_vk@hotmail.com Darden Graduate School of Business, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904, venkatesanr@darden.virginia.edu Americas Market Intelligence, IBM Corporation, New York, New York 10589, tbohling@us.ibm.com Americas Market Intelligence, IBM Corporation, Atlanta, Georgia 30327, dmbeck@us.ibm.com

V. Kumar

Rajkumar Venkatesan Tim Bohling

Denise Beckmann

C

ustomer management activities at firms involve making consistent decisions over time, about: (a) which customers to select for targeting, (b) determining the level of resources to be allocated to the selected customers, and (c) selecting customers to be nurtured to increase future profitability. Measurement of customer profitability and a deep understanding of the link between firm actions and customer profitability are critical for ensuring the success of the above decisions. We present the case study of how IBM used customer lifetime value (CLV) as an indicator of customer profitability and allocated marketing resources based on CLV. CLV was used as a criterion for determining the level of marketing contacts through direct mail, telesales, e-mail, and catalogs for each customer. In a pilot study implemented for about 35,000 customers, this approach led to reallocation of resources for about 14% of the customers as compared to the allocation rules used previously (which were based on past spending history). The CLV-based resource reallocation led to an increase in revenue of about $20 million (a tenfold increase) without any changes in the level of marketing…...

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