Free Essay

Managing the Boss

In: Business and Management

Submitted By payasopr
Words 3954
Pages 16
The relationship with your boss is probably the most important relationship you have at work.
Boss management can stimulate better performance, improve your working life, job satisfaction, and workload. Give your boss a hand and reap the rewards.
________________________________________
When we think of managing someone, we usually think of managing our team members or subordinates. The above title appeared for the first time a few years ago in a Harvard Business Review article written by two well known socio-psychologists.
Their argument was that in modern companies, subordinates are not solely dependent on their bosses, but that today's complexity requires interdependence: the boss needs her team as well.
I have the vantage point of being an adviser to top management, a CEO, and now as Co-Director of the PED program at IMD. In addition, I have been involved in the restructuring of a major international company, which involves some 12,000 people and 12 hierarchical levels.
In order to unleash the energies and get closer to customers, we divided the group into 250 'small companies' of some 50 people each and of three hierarchical levels. To change the mindset, we organised a 20-day management seminar, during which we discussed the challenge of how to deal with bosses, who in the old structure, tended to hamper change.
The whole process forced me to crystallize my observations and previous experience and test them with the 250 managers. I have grouped the results into ten rules that try to answer some common questions asked by managers with respect to managing their bosses, with the aim of helping the relationship become more effective, foster faster decisions, better decisions and more trust.
1. Decisions: If you do not want a 'no' or procrastination, give him/her a hand
Your boss has other subordinates, other decisions to make. Thus, her (for simplicity, we use 'her' from now on in this article) best bet, if she is pressed for a decision, will be to say no. No, it is too risky; no, we do not have enough evidence; no, it is the wrong timing; no, it is off strategy, et cetera.
• To avoid the 'no' that will ruin your and your team's enthusiasm, give her a hand.

Remind her of where you left it last time you met;
• Remind her of the objective rather than rushing to the 'what' and 'how';
• Remind her of past problems encountered because a decision was not made;
• Quickly summarize the options considered, your criteria for selecting one option -- the one you are presenting;
• Tell her what you expect from her: simply to inform, to decide jointly, to share the risk, to add one criterion, to re-examine the option;
• Focus on the points where you need her help;
• Be prepared with facts/data for potential disagreements. Help her out with graphics and visuals so that the situation is grasped faster;
• After your meeting, summarize for her the decision in writing to make sure of the understanding;
• And finally, once a decision has been made, your way, her way or no way, do not criticize it externally. You have become the best defender; the best ambassador of what was decided.
2. Manage her time: You may represent only 1% of her problems, don't make it as if it is 100%.
Yes, you have preoccupations, problems to solve and issues to tackle. However, while your time is entirely devoted to them, do not expect your boss's time to be also.
• The more simple the problem or issue at hand is, the less time you should have her spend on it: prepare, summarize, and synthesize information and options. Do not confuse your more frequent problems with the most important ones.
• Book her for several meetings in advance. Nothing is more frustrating than to have to wait days, weeks or months for that extra new meeting needed in order to finalize a decision or a project.
3. An opinion: If you ask for her opinion, she will always have one.
Rare are the bosses who, when asked for their advice or their decision, will use the psychological ping-pong approach of retuning the question to the person who asked.
And their opinion may not always be that of a genius or a visionary. However, once given, the opinion becomes a constraint: was it an order? So, if you don't want your boss's opinion to thwart your achievements, to slow the speed of decision-making, or cloud the viewpoint, then don't ask for it. Best of all, don't ask if you don't need her opinion.
• Choose the right moment to avoid procrastination: not only save her time by focusing on big issues, but choose the right moment to do so. If you present an issue at the wrong moment, the chances are she will procrastinate.
• Prepare for your meeting: first because the advantage is to the one who is prepared, second because the preparation helps you reduce the time taken to come to the central issue.
• Show the forest before the trees in a discussion: if you want to avoid spending a lot of time on going back to basics before she is at full speed with you, start with the basics yourself. Remind her of the objective, where you stand today, and what you want her opinion on.
4. Information: It is not data.
Turn grapes into wine: you are supposed to analyze the results of a market survey, and not be the mailman who passes the thick document full of statistics to your boss. So be selective; be visual; group the data; bring out what is essential. Data overload creates stress, which in turn can create denial, rejection, and numbness. As a manager, you are paid to collect the grapes (data), and turn them into wine, i.e. useful information.
• Don't give her only the bad news: give her also the good news. If you keep bringing only bad news, little by little you become the bad news yourself. Don't minimize good news, because you want to focus on the problems. By doing that you contribute to creating a bad atmosphere.
• Make sure she does not get the information from others too often: sometimes by being shy about what we should give or because we think it is not relevant, we don't feed our boss with key elements. However, other people could do it before you. And then the hassle starts. "I heard that…", "Why didn't you tell me that…"
• And then you need to justify yourself; you may need to modify incorrect information. The trade off is between too little information leading to starvation, frustration, and/or restlessness vs too much information leading to overload.
• Round off: what helps more to give sense to an amount or a size: 886,262.11 or 890K? What makes the decision-making process faster: 79.27% vs 21.73% or simply 80% vs 20%. Look back at all the tables you sent to your boss in the last twelve months.
• Participate in and contribute to her informal network: every manager, hopefully, does not rely solely for managing on formal information given in internal documents and reports. Some people use internal informal networks. Some others also have an informal outside network of experts, friends, business connections that help them shape their vision of the world and how to act. You have yours; your boss has too. Why not volunteer part of yours, so that you do not always have to react and be defensive about information fed by people you do not necessarily think are the best sources?
5. Problems: Don't just come with problems, come also with solutions.
Good bosses hate two kinds of behavior. The courtesan who always comes to tell you how great you are and the pyromaniac/fireman who comes to tell you "There is a huge problem" and then says "but don't worry, I will solve it!"
There is also a third kind, the monkey transferor. She has a problem and she puts it on your shoulders, rather than bringing a solution or at least some options.
Problems usually have several aspects. It is usually a gap between an objective and the result; there are options to close the gap; there is a choice of one option to be made; key tasks, dates, people and resources needed must be defined.
On which of those steps in problem solving do you want your boss's input? Just be clear on what input you want rather than come with the stressful -- "I have a problem…" and throw the monkey.
6. Assumptions: Do not assume she knows as much as you do, but assume she can understand; so educate her. Please help, you are the expert. You spend all of your time and that of your team on the issue. You live with data, pressure points and levers; your boss does not. She does not know more than you do.
Most senior executives are even dangerous when they get involved in making micro-decisions, as their point of reference is often not the current one but rather the situation they knew when they were junior managers.
If you need her perspective, it is because it is broader; she has a better sense for inter-relationships with other parts of the organisation. You have two options.
• You inundate her with technical stuff she does not understand, hoping that the amount of technical jargon will knock her down and force her to agree with you. It may work, but it may become a barrier in communication leading to lack of trust.
• You educate him by simplifying, using easy to understand language, feeding him with articles, examples, best practices, summaries that help him see a perspective. By creating understanding, you relieve tensions; create trust that can lead to better decision-making.
7. Delegations: Constantly test the waters.
It is not always easy to define ex ante what is delegated to a person. Some companies prefer to use the principle of subsidiary rather than the principle of delegation: the principle of subsidiary stipulates that you can do everything except the following list, whereas in the principle of delegation you stipulate, "you cannot do anything except…"
Whichever is used, there will always be some doubt whether you have or do not have the delegation. You have two options: either you play it safe by always asking your boss's opinion. This can lead to paralysis, bottlenecks and your own demise, as your boss will think you are unable to take responsibility.
Or you assume too much, take decisions and learn after the fact that it was not yours to decide. In between, there is the 'test the waters' strategy especially for things or areas, domains or steps that are unprecedented.
8. Promises: Do not promise what you cannot deliver, and avoid surprises, trust is at stake.
Trust does not develop overnight and depends a lot on the predictability of the other person: what she says and does, how often she is living up to or not living up to her statements. In the same way, you will not fully trust your boss if she changes her mind too often or says things contrary to what you were told the last time.
You also want to avoid being seen as unreliable by not delivering on what you promise or surprising her with bad news without forewarning.
Do not promise dates for finishing projects you cannot handle. If you see that too much is asked of you, sit down and re-discuss priorities before proceeding, rather than becoming yourself a bottleneck. Involve your boss in the process, so it becomes a common priority.
Avoid bad surprises. If your job is to be in charge of a particular area, then it is also to be in charge of bad results and improving them.
Involve your boss in discussing and evaluating the risks, agreeing on key lead indicators that you will both share, so that neither you nor he will be surprised. For instance, whereas sales are not a good lead indicator, future orders or bookings can be. Cash in the bank is not, whereas good cash flow three months in advance is.
9. Differences: Manage differences in culture.
Sometimes at IMD we use a questionnaire called the Power Map to help participants identify their own culture (i.e. values they cherish, leading to certain behaviors), to identify other executives' profiles and discuss consequences on communication and leadership in a team.
To simplify, the four main types of profiles that our survey identified are:
• People who like to 'control things' and introduce processes, develop more the 'now';
• People who are more concerned with people, develop more the impact on people;
• People who are more concerned with getting things done, start with key actions;
• People who are more concerned with ideas, frame proposals in concepts.
Of course, in managing your boss you should know her personal inclination, as well as your personal bias. If you are process oriented, you will tend to present issues in a systematic and orderly fashion, with pros and cons, chronology of tasks, etc.
If your boss is the action type, she could be bored. So in that case an executive summary, emphasizing the key actions and results would be a handy starting point.
10. Trust: Don't be sloppy in your documentation. It undermines trust.
By making the assumption that she will check what we write or say anyway, and that she will make changes, we sometimes tend to be sloppy in our writing. Tables are not finished, text is not re-read, places we are going to are not visited beforehand, spelling is not checked, and information is missing...
By not finalizing your facts, arguments, memos, spelling, supporting documents, etc., you can be sure some things will get changed, mistakes corrected. And soon you will be asked to show more facts and figures, and you will see more changes, more amendments. Soon all the delegation you had will be gone.
Conclusion
Better work between a boss and his subordinate is not just a matter of leadership. It also has to do with boss 'management', which can stimulate better performance, faster decision making and accomplishment of more … by both parties.

Over the years, the meaning of the word Boss transformed into referring to a un-understanding superior who mindlessly and aggressively bullies his/her subordinates. Thus, the art and science of managing the Boss is born, nurtured and practiced unabashedly.
The path of least resistance is to cater to the weaknesses of the Boss and put in place a supply chain of free and unending provision of all the good things of life to the Boss at all times. Irrespective of the degree of culture and civilization of the person holding the post of Boss, many of them yield to this temptation of freely getting everything, that too in secrecy, and reward such supply chain subordinate with out of turn promotions..
The other easier method is to organize a twenty four hour eavesdropping service, whereby a particular subordinate does not attend to his/her allotted duties, but keeps tabs on the colleagues; professional and private lives, promptly carrying them to the eager ears of the Boss, The news will always be so juicy, that most Bosses never take the trouble of verifying this second hand information. This gossip siphoning subordinate normally does not get out of turn promotion, but keeps his post irrespective of his performance. These rumour carriers normally blackmail a weak colleague and gets his/her official work done through him/her.
However, every subordinate does not stoop down that low. Even every Boss does not fall for such wiles of cunning and conniving subordinates, though this tribe is alarmingly on the rise these days. As there are different kinds of subordinates, there are as many types of superiors, too. The Bosses can broadly be categorized into eight brands, depending on their attitudes, aptitudes, philosophies and styles of management. An understanding of the Boss, according to his/her style statement and brand, will make the life of the subordinate easier to get on under the Boss and generally improve the ambience of the workplace, thus paving the way for increased productivity. Hereunder, then, are the eight different brands of Bosses Managing the BOSS
The democratic boss:
A democratic boss is a pleasant boss. He is the one who believes in involving his subordinates in the process of decision-making. He gives a fair hearing to everyone and welcomes suggestions. He may even go the extent of changing his decision if he feels that it is not acceptable to everyone. He respects his subordinates’ feelings and generally avoids ticking them off in public. The democratic boss is easy to tackle and does not need any special handling. But he does not tolerate inefficiency. If you are a lethargic workers, you are likely to be ticked off, anyway. A democratic system of management draws the line at indulgence. Managing the BOSS
The autocratic Boss:
Although one may feel that one’s boss is an autocrat just because he likes to have his way, this is not the definition of an autocratic boss. An autocratic boss goes much beyond the limitation of enforcing his ideas. He is totally disrespectful of his subordinates’ intelligence. He does not care for the ideas of others. Cohesive working is not his cup of tea. His channel of communication is one, which travels downwards only. He does not believe in checking back on the facts before he fires his subordinates. The only way to deal with an autocratic boss is to allow him to have his way and to look for another job, if you cannot do so, it does not pay to cross swords with him or argue with him. You will have to accept his decisions and carry them out to perfection. The workaholic boss:
A workaholic boss works like a tireless horse. He does not wear a watch nor does he keep a clock on his table. To him, the setting of the sun does not bring a message. He is wedded to his profession and knows nothing of the world beyond the confines of his cabin walls. He expects his subordinates to leave after he leaves the office. He is prone to assigning tasks at all odd hours and expects them to be completed by the next morning. Working late hours is a habit and an addiction with him. Most often, he has no family life and has scant respect for others. Handling a workaholic boss can be quite tricky. Forget about your wife and children or the appointment you made with your girlfriend. In fact, forget everything except your work and your boss if you want to be in his good books.A workaholic boss is not necessarily heartless. He has his own moods and flashes of benevolence. He will reward you with a promotion or a holiday, if he feels that you have earned it. He will give you everything except time off from work.
The Perfectionist boss:
God help you, if you have this type of a boss. He is a boss who will not accept anything but the best. He is the nit-picking type. Nothing pleases him. He is a tough taskmaster who demands a lot form himself as well as his subordinates. Whether it is the reporting time at work, or the neatness or the quantum, he is a pusher all the way. He drives himself as well as others, forcefully. If you are not able to do a job well, you better look out for another job. There is no place for substandard work as far as this boss is concerned. Work well and you will surely be rewarded handsomely. Try not to fake or fool the boss. A perfectionist is too smart to be fooled.
The weak boss:
One important thing to remember about weak bosses is that they do not like confident and super-efficient subordinates. It is mainly to do with their own feeling of inadequacy. A weak boss can sabotage your career in a very effective manner. He is basically insecure and fearful about his own career. His insecurity does not allow him to accept the confidence of his subordinates. He will pass the buck when something goes wrong and swallow all the credit when things are going well. It is best to be discreet when dealing with a weak boss. Work in tandem with him at the speed and pace set out by him. Keep yourself in the sideline, especially when the top bosses are in town. If you weak boss gets a threat perception, he is surely going to nip your career in the budding stage. Managing the BOSS
The Indulgent boss:
An indulgent boss likes to treat his subordinates like children. He does not entrust or delegate. He likes to do all the important jobs himself, allotting work piecemeal to others. He is considerate, kind and understanding. He can handle the failures in a realistic manner and generally takes the blame for disasters. He is efficient and quick. He is liberal with his praise and extremely genial by nature. You are lucky, if you have an indulgent boss. The only problem is that you may not make swift progress in your career because you do not get enough chances to prove your worth. The policy to follow is to wait and watch. Handled tactfully, the indulgent boss can be made to bend his rule and pass on some responsibilities. Count your blessings and work towards establishing the faith required for him to delegate. Make yourself indispensable.
The bullying boss:
A bullying boss is aggressive by nature. The tough boss allows no room for error. He has a strong need to control and intimidate others. He is a highly emotional person. He is not likely to allow anyone to have his say or explain. He issues threats and fires subordinates. He is like a drill sergeant in his approach and his style of management thrives on terror and submission. His angry outbursts may not be justified, at times. He believes that intimidation is the best way to get the work done. Tackling a bullying boss can be an extremely tricky affair. One way to deal with the situation is to pay back in the same coin. It is risky but it is an alternative. Most often than not, bullies tend to suppress those who do not retaliate; showing a bit of spirit could cow them down. Be tactful and diplomatic but convey the message the your are not likely to take it lying down. However, ensure that you’re indispensable and your work is totally flawless. Good luck! Managing the BOSS
The perfect boss:
This kind of boss is rare. There was a time when there were no business schools and there were no management degrees but there were good managers. The perfect boss did exist then and some still exist, but they are getting rarer-just like the perfect employee. A perfect boss is sensitive but has his emotions under control. He is willing to coordinate plans and programs with his subordinates. He guides them with a paternal attitude and has consideration for their feelings and limitations. A perfect boss lends psychological support to his subordinates and prizes the individual’s talents as well as abilities. He is able to read his subordinates, gauge their strengths and weaknesses and allots them the slots after careful scrutiny. He will never chastise anyone in public and will always give due respect to everyone.
In a lighter vein, most subordinates call a vexatious BOSS a SSOB, reading BOSS backwards. SSOB is an acronym for Super Son of a Bitch.

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Good Boss vs Bad Boss

...The Characteristics of a Good Boss vs. a Bad Boss According to a U.S. survey, 49% of employees want to fire their boss if they could (GALLUP Management Journal). In every state, there’s a hierarchy of management that keeps the operation running smoothly. A Florida State University did a study in 2007 and according to this study, 40% of workers think they work for an unsuccessful boss (management-issues.com). A large part of having a positive experience at work could depend on whether you have a good, successful boss (journalreview.com). Working as a boss is not easy, and a good boss is even more difficult because there are so many qualities that a boss must have to run a successful business. Leadership and management skills, personality, and a good work ethic are characteristics that a person must have to be a successful boss. A good boss will make their employee’s feel calm, appreciated, and inspired, whereas a bad boss will make you feel uneasy and resentful. A good boss must have leadership skills. A good leader must have the strength to work toward their vision, as well as to direct their actions, and the team’s actions toward the goal. A leader has a clear, vivid picture of where the team and they need to go, as well as a firm hold on what success looks like and how it needs to be achieved. Leaders are able to train others and be honest when an employee is not performing at their best. Leaders lead employees in a way that their talents and skills are utilized...

Words: 1077 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Being the Boss

...The words that keep going through my head after reading Being The Boss was that I wish I had found this book years ago when I started this journey into management. The book was thought-provoking and sometimes difficult to comprehend because of the notion that I may be stagnating in my own professional development was quite unnerving. What was even more concerning to me was the fact that I may be missing some key relationship- building, as well as managing myself, network, and team. What this book has made me do is take stock of all of the work that it takes to hone a skill set to become an effective leader and to continue to develop that skill set no matter how daunting the task may seem. I had never really considered the ideas of the three imperatives and I would say honestly there are some ideas in this book that I do currently understand and utilize. That being said, I learned these skills through making mistakes, which for me was a very humbling experience to say the least. This is not the way to become a great leader, but I think it is the reality in many cases. After reading the book Being The Boss it has given me a road map of what I need to work on and how to work on it. I believe that after reading this book this will make me consider management in a different light and will change the way that I work on a day-to-day basis, as well as planning into the future. There are three major imperatives that the authors discuss throughout the book and they require you to......

Words: 1892 - Pages: 8

Premium Essay

Managing Your Boss - Review

...Human Resource Management - Book Review “Managing Your Boss” by John J. Gabarro and John P. Kotter Harvard Business Review, 2005 Introduction People sometimes do not realize how much their bosses depend on them and many people also do not realize how much they depend on their boss. For example bosses need honesty from manager’s direct reports. People can managing their bosses for very good reasons: to get resources to do the best job, not only for their-selves but also for their bosses and their companies as well. Effective managers take time and effort to manage not only relationship with subordinates but also those with their bosses. This essential aspect of management is sometimes ignored by otherwise talented and aggressive managers. And there are some managers who actively and effectively supervise subordinates, markets, etc assume an almost passively reactive stance when they meet their bosses. With this mutual dependence, effective managers seek out information about boss’s concerns and are sensitive to his work style. Whether see the boss as the enemy or viewing the boss as an all-wise parent. Summary The book is divided into four big parts. First part is Misreading The Boss-Subordinate Relationship. This part provide about how two people can on occasional be psychological or temperamentally incapable of working together, where a personality conflict sometimes only a very small part of the problems. Sometimes people did not realize that their......

Words: 1385 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Good Boss/Bad Boss

...Week 7 – Appendix E Comparison and Contrast Draft – Good Boss/Bad Boss Do you enjoy your job? Do you look forward to going to work every day? Does work give you a sense of accomplishment? Hopefully it does because you may not be aware but; the Fair Labor Standard Act (FLSA) establishes that a traditional full time employee works 40 hours a week which means you spend 24% of your week at work. The National Sleep Foundation recommends an adult get seven to eight hours of sleep daily which means you spend another 24% of your time sleeping. This means we have the remaining 52% to spend with family and friends per week/year. This means that making your place of work your second home and your co-workers your extended family is very important. Now, you may have an idea why is so important to be happy at work considering we spend a quarter of our time there. I know it seems very easy but, the reality is that most of us at some point in our careers have come against a road block someone that just does not seem to get it or thinks his or her entire job is making work difficult. The managing style of a boss can have a great impact in our careers and our personal life. Although it seems a good and a bad boss do not have any similarities, they do have a few which makes even harder to understand the reason for the differences. Both a “Good Boss and a Bad Boss” have the same exact position the same roles and responsibilities and most of the time the same number of......

Words: 925 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Good Boss Bad Boss Review

...Book Review | Book Review | Good Boss, bad boss: How to be the best... and learn from the worst | Ottawa University Organizational Consultation Skills | Erin Smith | 11/18/2012 | | Good Boss Bad Boss wrote by Robert Sutton is the research and stories put together about good and bad bosses, and behaviors in the workplace that led to their successes and failures. This book gives insight and self awareness as part of an ongoing process toward becoming a great boss or leader. Suttons work was directed by three basic questions: His work is directed by three basic questions: If you want to be a Good Boss, what do you need to accomplish day after day, If you have a Bad Boss, what can you do about it, and In short, what are the hallmarks of a Good Boss, and worst flaws of a Bad Boss? (Sutton, 2010) In the beginning of the book Sutton takes a look at having the right mindset. Being a good boss creates a healthy environment. What is more, a good boss has "more impact on engagement and performance than whether their companies are rated as great or lousy places to work" (Sutton, 2010). Sutton points out that “the leaders of an organization still matters more than the other bosses.” (Sutton, 2010) Sutton points out many points, but one strong point that is a focus is that bosses matter. Sutton stated, “Bosses matter, especially to their immediate followers and in small teams and organization.” He points out that bosses need to act as if they are in control even......

Words: 705 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Good Boss and Bad Boss

...Difference right Good Bosses v. Bad Bosses: Know the Difference By Dennis McCafferty | Posted 2012-02-15 Email this article Email 0 0 Google +0 0 Very few people in this world answer to no one, and knowing who you're working for can make the difference between having a positive work experience and wanting to quit for good at quitting time. How can you tell if you've got a micromanager or a genuine team leader who's interested in the success of his or her team? In "Real Leaders Don't Boss: Inspire, Motivate and Earn Respect from Employees and Watch Your Organization Soar" (Career Press/available now), author Ritch K. Eich outlines ten "good boss/bad boss" scenarios, many of which you probably recognize from bygone gigs. As you advance in your own career, Eich contends, stay mindful that real leaders aren't born; rather, they evolve over time, learning through trial and error. Not ever bad boss, he says, is destined to stay a bad boss. Now founder/president of Eich Associated, Eich has held leadership positions at Stanford University Medical Center, Blue Shield of California and the University of Michigan, among other institutions. He also has served in the Pentagon, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, NATO (South), the Pacific and Atlantic Fleets (Commands), as well as other joint commands. For more about the book, click here. - See more at:......

Words: 273 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Good Boss vs Bad Boss

...Good Boss vs. Bad Boss Cherie "Stacy" Martin COM/170 Elements of University Composition and Communication I January 28, 2012 Deidra Powell-Wallace Good Boss vs. Bad Boss There are many aspects of becoming a boss but , it is the way you present yourself, that determines of you are a good boss or a bad boss. When you think of a boss, how would you define them as a good boss or a bad boss? A good boss is one that has respect for everyone she would be understanding, knowledgeable, caring, and a good solid leader. To become that leader she would have great organizational skills, which include setting a realistic goal for the day. Make a systematic plan as to what is the most important to the least important thing to do for the day, initiate your plan by delegating it out to your employees, and follow up throughout the day to make sure you are training and teaching your employees. This will help them create and teach them how to achieve a goal by the end of the day. Always be prepared for the unexpected, but still maintain your goal. A bad boss is one that has no respect, no knowledge, does not like her job and has no concept of how to plan a day’s work or even reach a goal. She would be the type of boss that expects you to know what to do, then if you mess the project up you get yelled at or even are fired. When it was no fault of yours it was because your boss is not a leader at all. She may come to work late and want the employee to do all the work.......

Words: 484 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Boss

...usually tapped out on time and this becomes a “nice to have” rather than “must have” conversation. However, unless you see it as a “must have,” say adios to some of your best people. Top talent isn’t driven by money and power, but by the opportunity to be a part of something huge, that will change the world, and for which they are really passionate. Big companies usually never spend the time to figure this out with those people. 3. Poor Annual Performance Reviews. You would be amazed at how many companies do not do a very effective job at annual performance reviews. Or, if they have them, they are rushed through, with a form quickly filled out and sent off to HR, and back to real work. The impression this leaves with the employee is that my boss — and, therefore, the company — isn’t really interested in my long-term future here. If you’re talented enough, why stay? This one leads into #4…. 4. No Discussion around Career Development. Here’s a secret for most bosses: most employees don’t know what they’ll be doing in 5 years. In our experience, about less than 5% of people could tell you if you asked. However, everyone wants to have a discussion with you about their future. Most bosses never engage with their employees about where they want to go in their careers — even the top talent. This represents a huge opportunity for you and your organization if you do bring it up. Our best clients have separate annual discussions with their employees — apart from their annual or......

Words: 1213 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Boss

...1787 to protect the town’s landward approaches, life-size tableaux create a dazzling impression of life in a bygone age. Here you find traditional Arab houses, mosques, souks, date farms and every aspect of daily life. Most spectacular is the gallery devoted to the pearl divers, whose literally breath-taking exploits brought fame and riches to old Dubai. I would say tourist who like historical tours and fascinating facts about history, dubai would suit you very well due to the many historical ruins, castle and museum they have there. AL FAHIDI FORT Shopping Retail outlets include: Bloomingdales, Louis Vuitton, Cole Haan, Debenhams, Ralph Lauren, Rolex, Marks and Spencer, Max Mara, Mossimo Dutti, DKNY, Dolce and Gabbana, Dockers, Hugo Boss, Faconnable, Paul Smith, Lacoste, Fred Perry, Pierre Cardin, Ermenegildo Zegna, Guess, Mango, Zara and a lot lot more. People might suggest that prices in these shops are too high but that’s because of the income within this coutry are too high which is why shops like these cost a lot. The most famous reason as to why anyone goes to dubai other than hot weather is for shopping. Dubai is a shopping haven and is famous around the world due to the big names recognised within dubai. Dubai has been called the "shopping capital of the Middle East’ they have been called this for a reason due to the many variety of shops they have for their costumers. I suggest this would attract tourist with high income due to the shops in dubai being mostly......

Words: 2095 - Pages: 9

Free Essay

Managing Your Boss

...Managing Performance and Motivation Mabel M. Miguel Professor of Organizational Behavior miguel@unc.edu ©2013 Mabel Miguel Road Map for Today • Motivation and the EPO framework: – Definitions and Examples – Hausser Foods Case • A more detailed look at the application of EPO – Five common problem areas applying EPO 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Opportunity & Ability Goal Setting / Expectations Feedback Metrics and Equity Incentives and Rewards If a pretty poster and a cute saying are all it takes to motivate you, you probably have a very easy job. The kind robots will be doing soon. • Application to own challenges 2 What Factors Influence Employee Performance? • Turn to your neighbors • Take 2 min to: – Generate a list of factors that affect employee performance The Takeaway:  Many (or most) of the factors that influence employee performance are controlled by management  Thus, the performance of your subordinates is mostly in your hands and the key question becomes: How do I lead & motivate members of my organization so that they perform well? 3 Relationship of Motivation and Performance • Motivation: Desire to put effort toward achieving a goal – Direction (what should I do?) – Intensity (how hard should I work?) – Persistence (how long should I work?) • This often results in higher… – Performance: quality of work produced – Productivity: quantity of work produced 4 EPO: How Individuals Determine Effort (Direction, Intensity &......

Words: 4307 - Pages: 18

Free Essay

Boss

...I BE BOS ye boi i be so bos like you know me bos like love like boss me so boss what yo usay? i be s a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a s s d df ew r f w rf ew rf e 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 87 8 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 2 2 2 2......

Words: 873 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Micro-Managing Boss

...Essay – League of Denial 1) Assume you have a friend who is an avid fan of North American football. What would tell your friend about the potential neurological consequences of playing football and what is currently being done to prevent neurological injuries? The first thing I would say is that while football is certainly fun and entertaining to watch, the human body was not designed to handle the frequent hard hits to the body and head as a result of playing the sport. Unfortunately these professional athletes end up suffering from brain damage as a result of our thirst and fascination for hard hits and violence. I would explain that while football helmets seem safe, they truly only provide very minimal protection against concussions that cause the brain to bounce, shake and rotate back and forth hitting against the wall of the human skull as a result of frequent football tackles that appear harmless to those watching the sport. To ensure the message hits home, I would bring up examples of their favourite former NFL players such as Hall of Famer Mike Webster who actually suffered neurological effects of playing the sport. It is important to highlight the most severe consequences first, which is that playing football can cause severe trauma to the brain as a result of multiple concussions that these athletes regularly experience. This trauma starts to destroy the integrity of the brain cells, causing a degenerative brain disease known as Chronic Traumatic......

Words: 3380 - Pages: 14

Free Essay

The Boss

...The Ganssle Group logo In any electrical circuit, appliances and wiring will burn out to protect fuses. - Robert Byrnes Seminars Newsletter Videos Tool & Book Reviews Special Reports Articles Random Rants Computer Humor Contact/Search Memo To My Boss The logo for The Embedded Muse For novel ideas about building embedded systems (both hardware and firmware), join the 25,000+ engineers who subscribe to The Embedded Muse, a free biweekly newsletter. The Muse has no hype, no vendor PR. It takes just a few seconds (just enter your email, which is shared with absolutely no one) to subscribe. By Jack Ganssle Published in Embedded Systems Programming, November, 2001 MEMO To: Bob Smith, CEO From: Jake Schmidt Attch: resig.doc Dear Bob, I wanted to respond to your memo of the 16th. Circulated as it was to seemingly half the company I feel we developers are now operating under an insurmountable stigma. Yes, we all know the product shipped late. Very late. You want to know why the schedule was missed so badly, and want an action plan to assure this problem will never reoccur. I was just one of many developers on the project. Others on the team will probably respond with apologetic platitudes. However, you'll note my resignation is attached so I feel no pressure to paper over the very real problems with politically-correct but worthless suggestions. Let me assure you, that, contrary to your strongly-stated opinion, we were not "spending half...

Words: 2456 - Pages: 10

Free Essay

Boss

...documented for each service. 1.1.6.c Examine firewall and router configurations to verify that the documented security features are implemented for each insecure service, protocol, and port. Compromises often happen due to unused or insecure service and ports, since these often have known vulnerabilities and many organizations don’t patch vulnerabilities for the services, protocols, and ports they don't use (even though the vulnerabilities are still present). By clearly defining and documenting the services, protocols, and ports that are necessary for business, organizations can ensure that all other services, protocols, and ports are disabled or removed. Approvals should be granted by personnel independent of the personnel managing the configuration. If insecure services, protocols, or ports are necessary for business, the risk posed by use of these protocols should be clearly understood and accepted by the organization, the use of the protocol should be justified, and the security features that allow these protocols to be used securely should be documented and implemented. If these insecure services, protocols, or ports are not necessary for business, they should be disabled or removed. For guidance on services, protocols, or ports considered to be insecure, refer to industry standards and guidance (e.g., NIST, ENISA, OWASP, etc.). Payment Card Industry (PCI) Data Security Standard, v3.2 © 2006-2016 PCI Security Standards Council, LLC.......

Words: 57566 - Pages: 231

Premium Essay

Becoming the Boss

...that we often overlook it: becoming a boss for the first time. That’s a shame, because the trials involved in this rite of passage have serious consequences for both the individual and the organization. Executives are shaped irrevocably by their first management positions. Decades later, they recall those first months as transformational experiences that forged their leadership philosophies and styles in ways that may continue to haunt and hobble them throughout their careers. Organizations suffer considerable human and financial costs when a person who has been promoted because of strong individual performance and qualifications fails to adjust successfully to management responsibilities. VEN FOR THE MOST GIFTED INDIVIDUALS, O S S hbr.org | January 2007 | Harvard Business Review 49 THE TESTS OF A LEADER | Becoming the Boss The failures aren’t surprising, given the difficulty of the transition. Ask any new manager about the early days of being a boss – indeed, ask any senior executive to recall how he or she felt as a new manager. If you get an honest answer, you’ll hear a tale of disorientation and, for some, overwhelming confusion. The new role didn’t feel anything like it was supposed to. It felt too big for any one person to handle. And whatever its scope, it sure didn’t seem to have anything to do with leadership. In the words of one new branch manager at a securities firm: “Do you know how hard it is to be the boss when you are so out of control?......

Words: 5923 - Pages: 24