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Marketing Essential - Hbr

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Harvard ManageMentor | Marketing Essentials | Printable Version

Page 1 of 70

Click here for a definition of marketing; ways to analyze market opportunities, plan a marketing program, launch new products or services, and put your marketing program into action; and the nature of direct marketing and relationship marketing.

Click here to discover the steps for conducting market research.

Click here for tips on building a marketing orientation in your group or firm, selecting the right marketing-communications mix, creating effective advertising, designing powerful sales promotions, launching a potent online marketing effort, and evaluating your group's or firm's sales representatives.

Click here for forms and worksheets that help you calculate the lifetime value of a customer, perform a SWOT or breakeven analysis, fill out a product profile, and create a marketing plan.

Click here to see how far you've come in learning about marketing and ways to improve it in your work group or firm.

If you'd like to dig more deeply into this topic, click here for an annotated list of helpful resources. Summary This topic helps you

http://www.harvardmanagementor.com/demo/demo/market/print.htm

05/25/2003

Harvard ManageMentor | Marketing Essentials | Printable Version l l l l

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grasp the basic elements of a marketing strategy and plan create a marketing orientation in your group or firm understand and navigate the steps in the marketing process plan effective marketing programs, advertising campaigns, and sales promotions

Topic Outline

What Is Marketing? Defining a Marketing Orientation Developing a Marketing Orientation Analyze Market Opportunities—Consumers Analyze Market Opportunities—Organizations Understand the Competition Develop a Marketing Strategy Marketing Communications Develop New Products From Marketing Plan to Market A…...

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