Martin Luther King’s (Mlk) “Letter from Birmingham Jail” Argument Analysis

In: English and Literature

Submitted By kmccrite01
Words 1426
Pages 6
Kyle McCrite
Ms. Vaughn
English 102-01
14 September 2009
Someone Else’s Shoes
Martin Luther King’s (MLK) “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” was written in 1963 as a response to the Eight Alabama Clergymen’s public statement against King’s actions in April of that year. Martin Luther King Jr. was an activist for desegregation of the south in the early 1960s and overcame much adversity to attain incredible gains on the segregation issue in the United States. King uses effective persuasive appeals of logical evidence, emotional appeal, and author credibility to win over his audience in “The Letter from Birmingham Jail.” MLK’s writing shows the effects of segregation in Birmingham with clear direct language and heart wrenching examples. Imagine being put in his position. If your family and friends were being treated cruelly and unjustly would you not help them in any way possible, especially if included in the mistreated group? After reading MLK’s letter, maybe you would see things in a different way with his convincing examples of logical and emotional appeal.
Martin Luther King proves his credibility by several factors. The first way King proves he is a credible author is the fact that he is in the Birmingham jail. He is arrested while protesting in the city. The reader can believe that MLK is writing about something that he is well versed in because he shows that he has experienced it firsthand. Another way that Martin Luther King shows he’s plausible is by stating “I have the honor of serving as president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference,” (654) which has many affiliates across the southern United States. King leads protests for his affiliates that need help in the national struggle for human rights. He has personally protested for black rights and desegregation throughout the South confirming his credibility by proving that he has been there…...

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