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Marx Vs Hegel

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18th and 19th centuries are the start points of mechanization and industrialization .During this era, society was transformed from feudal structure to industrial society due to changing production systems. Europe was the most affected area within the changing production systems and building new type of society. Therefore, Many European thinker in that period built theories for the changing structure and reshaped it. Marx who influence following social scientists until today with his theories is one of those thinkers. In this paper, I’ll analyze Marx’s social theory, relations of production, social classes and the structures of capitalist society. Hegelian dialectic approach was the key figure for Marx while he was building the social theory. …show more content…
" (Avineri, pp . 13, 9, 14) Marx rebelled against Hegel's philosophy in which ideas were taken to be the important determinants of history. Marx’s critique of Hegel had moved from the history of ancient philosophy, to the conception of the state. To what extend is Marx far from Hegel? To Hegel, ethical life has three components which are civil society, family and government. Those components make understanding freedom and articulation of reason at higher stage easier. However, Marx’s critique of Hegel’s philosophy of the state allowed him to see that both civil society and the state were alien to a truly human life, which at that time he called ‘true democracy’ .(Smith) Economic bases is significant for social analysis of Marx. Productive forces and relations of production are the key concepts of his analysis. Those are relevant each other and related with other social relations. He sees entering into production relations is indispensable and independent of the will (Marx). Production relations specify general process of social, economic and political life. Marx’s ideas can be best explained by: …show more content…
Social organization could be referred by relations of production. On the other hand, using natural sources is one of best feature of human as distinct from an animal. For Marx, history is dependent on the existence of human beings, who produce their own means of subsistence, and the resulting means of production determines their way of life. Society can only develop, history can only progress, and ideology and power can only work if every cycle of production is followed by another cycle of production. To what extent does social structure related with production relations? To Marx, in past, economic systems, for example, feudal society, a man worked for himself and produced and made what he needed for himself and his family, while trading on a small scale to purchase from small businessmen his other necessities. From these activities he received senses of identity and self-worth, and he had the power to develop mentally and physically in whatever area he desired. Separation from the activities that gave him pleasure, satisfaction and purpose in life caused him to feel detached from himself and all things around him, and he felt a loss of purpose. On the other hand, the worker was now in a situation whereby he did not produce an entire item, had no control over what he produced, and was now in competition with other men for his livelihood (Marx).In

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