Marxism Before His Death

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This essay will discuss how Marxism has developed after Marx’s death. This will be done by discussing ideas interpreted by Karl’s followers which formed the ideology of Marxism. I will discuss Hegel and the dialectical method, Classical French political, social and revolutionary theory and Classical British Political Economy. I will also discuss how Marx’s work has influenced the works of Edward Bernstein, Vladimir Lenin and Leon Trotsky.
Karl Marx, born on 5th may 1818, was born into a middle class Jewish family. During his teenager years Marx studied law in the University of Bonn in 1835, until he transferred to the University of Berlin the following year to study his main interest of philosophy. During this time Karl started to work on his doctoral thesis, “some contrasts in the philosophies of Democritus and Epicurus” (Singer, P,. 2000, p-5). This was accepted in 1841 by the University of Jena. Marx became interested in journalism and began to write on philosophical, political and social issues for a new founded liberal newspaper, the Rhenish Gazette. Karl Marx also studied Hegel and the dialectical method. Hegel discussed the mode of production. This was about society and how it functions in the world of work. The bosses of the working class held the forces of production, for example owning factories and machines. However the working class held the relations of production, as they worked for the bosses to earn money for their families, using the skills that they held and learning new skills on the job, for example learning how to operate a certain machine in a factory. Karl worked on his philosophical positions during 1844 as he was fired from his job at the gazette, however could afford to not work because of a pay out from the gazette.
During his time out from working a friendship between Engels and Marx began. Engels was the son of a German industrialist.…...

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