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Mas Communication, the Impact of Advertising on Media Bias

In: Other Topics

Submitted By AzianChemistry
Words 429
Pages 2
Topic: The impact of advertising on media bias

The Impact of Advertising on Media Bias. (2012). Journal of Marketing Research:

February, Esther Gal-Or, Tansev Geylani, Tuba Pinar Yildirim (2012). Journal of

Marketing Research: February 2012, Vol. 49, No. 1, pp. 92-99. Retrieved from

http://dx.doi.org/10.1509/jmr.10.0196

The authors in this study investigate the effecting of advertising in the media bias, the marketers evaluate the size and composition of the difference outlets of the

readership when they making advertising choices. They also demonstrate their

right target market with the advertising supplements subscription fees and it may

serve as a polarizing or contingent on the extent of distinctiveness among

advertisers to readers who have difference preference in politics. Each advertiser

will have to choose a single outlet for placing their ad when manifoldness is large

and the greater of polarize rises compare to when media outlet relies on

subscription fees only for revenue. If the distinctive is small, advertiser chooses

multiple outlets and the polarization results are reduced.

Media bias and advertising: Evidence from a German car magazine (2014). Dewenter,

Ralf; Heimeshoff, Ulrich (2014). DICE Discussion Paper, No. 132, ISSN 2190‐9938 (

online). Retrieved from

http://fgvwl.hsu-hh.de/wp-vwl

This paper analyzing the impact of automobile reviews in manufacturer's advertising in a German car magazine to investigate the possibility of media bias. They believe difference media bias arises because difference audiences have difference effect on two-sided-markets. By using two-step procedure, they find a positive impact of advertising on test scores by using the measurement of technique characteristics of cars. When it done right, it can avoiding...

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