Math

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By mrpoetic09
Words 1208
Pages 5
2015
Todd Marbury
Dr. Lauren Goldstein
Intro to Psychology
June 7, 2015
2015
Todd Marbury
Dr. Lauren Goldstein
Intro to Psychology
June 7, 2015
Retrospective Analysis of Personality
Retrospective Analysis of Personality

Through the years I wondered what made me change my personality towards the way I look at things but now I see why I drastically made these changes due to the different people and environments I have been. I have changed in too many ways to recount all of them, but a few I will list. In this essay I will discuss the aspect of my life that has and has not changed, analyze the role of nature and nurture within my personality and discuss why most memories are bias, which makes systemic scientific more valued than individual accounts.
Psychologists strive to understand how personality develops as well as how it influences the way we think and behave. This area of psychology seeks to understand personality and how it varies among individuals as well as how people are similar in terms of personality. While there is no single agreed upon definition of personality, it is often thought of as something that arises from within the individual and remains fairly consistent throughout life. It encompasses all of the thoughts, behavior patterns, and social attitudes that impact how we view ourselves and what we believe about others and the world around us. Understanding personality allows psychologists to predict how people will respond in certain situations and the sorts of things they prefer and value.
In retrospect, three traits, openness, extraversion, and agreeableness of my personality, have increased, while the other two of the “big 5” traits, conscientiousness and neuroticism, have remained common (Myers, 2014). In other words, I have become more open to new experiences as I engaged in more activities, such as working part-time. In 2015, I…...

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