Maxine Kingston

In: Historical Events

Submitted By jena0013
Words 783
Pages 4
Introduction :
Maxine Hong Kingston is an acclaimed author of several Books. She is a remarkable writer who showed the American world more than just the stereotypical view of the mystical and a magical China. Reflecting her history through her works has made her a famous feminist writer. Her passion for writing began at the age of nine and won her first award in a journalism contest at the University of California, Berkley at the age of 16.
Background History : Maxine Hong Kingston born in October 27, 1940.
She was the oldest third of 8 children
Her parents migrated from China.
Her first language was Say Yup, a Cantonese dialect. She grew up surrounded by immigrants from her father’s Village. Since an early age storytelling was part of her everyday life and later had a great impact of her writing.
Education
Maxine Hong Kingston was a very dedicated and bright student. She won eleven scholarships which allowed her to attend at the University of California at Berkeley . She initially started as a engineering major but eventually switched to English Major. While attending College she meet her husband, an aspiring actor and they moved to Hawaii where they taught for ten years. In this book uses her experiences while growing up and combines them or mixes them together stories that her mother use to tell her in which incorporates Chinese culture, history, believes and myths.

The Woman Warrior
In 1976 while teaching creative writing at Mid-Pacific institute, Maxine Hong Kingston published “The Woman Warrior – Memories of a Girlhood Among Ghosts “. The book gives voice to most influential women in her life who she felt, voices never been heard.
(in this book Maxine Hong Kinston examines the cultural experience and struggles of Chinese-Americans, particularly the female identity of Chinese-American women. Rather than taking a rigid stance against a…...

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