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Measuring People's Attitude Towards Psychotherapy

In: Business and Management

Submitted By MadallicA
Words 10080
Pages 41
1. Introduction
Psychotherapy is a process focused on helping you heal and learn more constructive ways to deal with the problems or issues within your life. It can also be a supportive process when going through a difficult period or under increased stress, such as starting a new career or going through a divorce (Hawkins, 2010).
Most psychotherapy tends to focus on problem solving and is goal-oriented. That means on the onset of treatment, you and your therapist decide up on which specific changes you would like to make in your life. These goals will often be broken down into smaller attainable objectives and put into a formal treatment plan (Hawkins, 2010).
The purpose of this study was to explore public attitudes toward psychotherapy treatment and how they perceive importance of psychotherapy treatment, mental health issues are of ever growing importance in modern society. While there are numerous studies on the attitude of the general public toward psychiatry in general, little research has been done concerning the specific field of psychotherapy (Hawkins, 2010).

2. Literature review
2.1 History of mental illness in the Middle East
2.1.1 Pre-Islamic era: Ancient Egyptians believed that diseases were mainly because of evil spirits or wrath of gods. Their philosophy of the afterlife came from the idea that they were part of continuous cycle. Therefore, they believed in the physical continuation of the life after death. From this belief, they gave much attention of the psychology and personality thereafter. (Mohit, 2001) In ancient Mesopotamia, diseases were blamed on spirits and ghosts. They linked each disease with a spirit or ghost. Therefore, medicine was part of magic. There were two types of medical magicians (diagnostician and healer). The diagnostician determines the type or the name of the spirit or ghost and the healer was a specialist...

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