Mechanics and Materials Measurement and Error Lab

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EML3012C – Lab #1
Measurement, Instrumentation, Statistics and Error



Group 1A




Lab Performed: 9-5-2012

Report Submitted: 10-11-2012






Table of Contents:


I. Motive…………………………………………………………….…………….iii

II. Experimental…………………………………………………………………..iv

III. Results/Discussion ………………….………………….…………..…….v-viii
Part 1 Data…………………………………………..………………………….......v
Part 1 Histogram……………………………………...……………………………vi
Part 1 Calculations…………………………………...………………………….v-vi
Part 2 Data summary……………………………………..…………………….…vii
Part 2 Calculations……………………………………….………………………viii

IV. Conclusion…………………………………………………………………….ix

V. Appendix…………………….……………………………………………...x-xii



















I. Motive:

The purpose of this lab is to analyze the error and deviation of manmade and manufactured objects. Measuring the marbles 100 times gives a population. The block’s dimensions (length, width, height) were measured 20 times each. This gives a sample for each dimension. From the population and samples, a histogram can be made of the data. Additionally, from these mean, mode, median, and standard deviation can be calculated. Lastly, the error and error propagation must be included because there is human and instrumental error.


































II. Experimental:

This lab had two parts. For the first part, 100 glass spheres were measured. The A spheres were used. In the second part, the dimensions of block #15 were measured. A caliper was used to measure the spheres and the block. The caliper labeled C-MECH 019 with ILE of 0.001in. was used. There were many measurements taken, therefore, some data maybe inaccurate (due to human error). All units are in inches.




































III. Results/discussion:

Part 1:…...

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