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Medical Innovations in the Early 20th Century

In: Historical Events

Submitted By Nikkicarn
Words 1681
Pages 7
Pharmacology Phunland
When people go to an amusement park, what do they look forward to the most? Cool rides? Great food? How about learning in a themed atmosphere? At Pharmacology Phunland, you’ll get all three! Your family will have a blast in our park while learning all about medicine advances in the 20th century. There are three sections, all with their own specified theme and rides. Additionally, there are two cool restaurants in which your family can enjoy exotic foods.
Learn all about the deadly virus in Polio Park! Featuring fun for the whole family, along with a valuable learning experience, Polio Park is themed around the highly infectious virus that swept the world. Being depicted as early as pre-history, polio is a virus that can affect the central nervous system and lead to the destruction of the motor neurons. This can lead to muscle weakness and paralysis. Before the 20th century, polio was found mostly in children between 6 months and 4 years old. However, before the mid-19th century, people who lived in poorer sanitation areas were constantly exposed to the virus, thus creating immunity. By the early 20th century, huge improvements were made in community sanitation. This lead to a pandemic outbreak of polio in Europe, North America, Australia, and New Zealand during the first half of the 19th century. By the mid-1950s, there were not one but two different versions of the polio vaccine. This cut polio outbreaks drastically. In this park, all of the rides have something to do with the polio pandemic during the 20th century.
In the Jonas Salk/Albert Sabin Rollercoaster Race, the dual roller-coasters (one named Salk, one named Sabin) race each other to see which ‘vaccine’ wins. Jonas Salk and Albert Sabin both created a vaccine for polio. They were, however, complete opposites. The vaccines, that is. Salk, born in New York, was an American...

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