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Medical Microbiology

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Submitted By Nur123
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A Case Of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma
A case was presented of a possible infection with non-hodgkins lymphoma. The patient is a 60 year old man that presented symptoms petering to the development of a follicular lymphoma. The patient has been suffering from colds and fevers more frequently in the past weeks and upon physical examination swelling was observed under his left armpit. Preliminary diagnosis suggests follicular lymphoma which is indicative of the lymphatic cancer Non-Hodgkins lymphoma.
Hodgkins lymphoma is a malingnant disorder of the lymphoid tissue often characterized by the painless progressive enlargement of the lymph nodes (Braun and Anderson, 2011). The exact cause of HL is unknown. Risk factors include exposure to viruses such as Ebstein-Barr virus, genetic factors, and immunosuppression. Incidence is highest in the ages between the aggression. Incidence is highest in those between the ages of 10 and 30 years and in those older than 50 years (Braun and Anderson, 2011).
HL is characterized by the presence of multinucleated giant cells (macrophages), called Reed-Sternberg cells, or mononuclear giant cells, called Hodgkin cells, surrounded by multiple other inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils, eosinophils, plasma cells, small lymphocytes, and fibroblasts. The pathogenesis of HL is still under investigation. The Reed-Sternberg or Hodgkins cell has been identified as the neoplastic cell diagnostic for HL. Susceptibility to specific viral oncogenes or certain HLA subtypes suggest a multifactoral etiology with a genetic influence (Braun and Anderson, 2011).
Non-hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a genetic classification made up of a broad range of B-cell and T-cell malignancies within the immune system (Braun and Anderson, 2011). NHL occurs much more frequently than HL, does not exhibit the malingnant Reed-Sternberg or Hodgkin cell, and is more likely to affect...

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