Mind and Brain

In: Other Topics

Submitted By Hashemi
Words 553
Pages 3
1. There are two conditions that are being described in this case. The two conditions are object agnosia and ideomotor apraxia. This study mainly focuses on apperceptive visual agnosia which is a type of object agnosia and it is a condition in which a person fails to recognize objects due to a functional impairment of the occipito-temporal vision areas of the brain. This condition does not affect other elementary visual functions such as acuity, color vision, and brightness discrimination. Apperceptive agnosics are not able to distinguish visual shapes and they have trouble recognizing, copying, or even discriminating between various visual stimuli.
There are three subtypes of apperceptive visual agnosia: Dorsal Simultanagnosia, Ventral Simultanagnosia, and Visual Hemi-neglect. Dorsal Simultanagnosia is caused by bilateral damage to the bilateral parieto-occipital region of the brain. Sight is limited to a single object without awareness of the other stimuli present. These patients also have a hard time perceiving objects which are in motion. Ventral Simultanagnosia is caused by damage to the left inferior temporo-occipital parts of the brain. Patients with this condition cannot identify more than on object at a time even though they can see more than one object at a time. Visual Hemi-neglect caused by damage to the right parietal lobe. Patients with this condition are unable to see stimuli from one half of the visual field. Ideomotor apraxia is a movement disorder which is associated with damage to the left parietal lobe. Patients with this condition have insufficiencies in their ability to plan or complete certain motor actions which rely on semantic memory. This case study focused on Dorsal Simultanagnosia.

2. The brain area that is involved in this condition is the posterior parietal cortex, which is a critical brain region along the dorsal visual…...

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