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Mother of the Dead

In: Novels

Submitted By abilicus1823
Words 466
Pages 2
Accelerated Prerequisite Course Equivalences
Prerequisite
(Quarter Credits) |UC
Main Campus |Cincinnati
State |On Line options |Miami University –
Oxford |UC
Raymond Walters |UC
Clermont |Sinclair College |Columbus State Community College | |
Anatomy & Physiology
I, II, & III
12 credits |
15 BIOL 201
15 BIOL 202
15 BIOL 203 |
BIO 4014
BIO 4015
BIO 4016 |University of Phoenix
NSCI 280 and 281
Anatomy & Physiology I and II

Marian University (Indianapolis)
BIO 225 and 226
Anatomy and Physiology |
ZOO 171
ZOO 172 |
28 BIOL 201
28 BIOL 202
28 BIOL 203 |
34 BIOL 201
34 BIOL 202
34 BIOL 203 |
BIO 141
BIO 142
BIO 143 |
BIO 261
BIO 262
(On-line section available with weekly on-campus lab) | |
Child Psychology
3 credits |
18 EDST 301,
15PSYC205,
15 PSYC 617 |
PSY 1508
(On-line section available) |University of Iowa
College of Nursing
3 Sem. Hrs
# 096 : 030 |
PSY 231 |
28 PSYC 205 |
34 PSYC 205 |PSY 205 or
PSY 208
(On-line section available) | | |Microbiology or
Elementary Bacteriology
3 credit |
15 BIOL 271 |
BIO 4009
(On-line course section with on-campus lab) |University of Iowa
College of Medicine
3 Sem. Hrs
061 : 190
Marian University (Indianapolis)
BIO 214 |
MBI 161 |
28 BIOL 281 |
34 BIOL 281 |
BIO 205 |BIO 215
(On-line section available with weekly on-campus lab) | |
Pathophysiology
4 credits |
29 NURS 270 |
BIO 4020
(On-line section available) |University of Iowa
College of Nursing
3 Sem. Hrs.
096 : 118 |

|
28 ALH-270 |
34 ALH 278 |
ALH 220 |
BIO 263
(On-line section available) | |
Pharmacology for Nurses
4 credits

|

29 NURS 205 |

BIO 4018
(On-line section available) |Indiana University
Nursing B219
Pharmacology
3 Sem. Hrs.
Jackson (MI) Comm. College
NUR 121, Pharmacology
Preq. A&P & Math course
3 Sem. credits | |

28 BIOL 286 |

34 ALH 271 |

ALH 219
(On-line section available) |

| |

Genetics
2 credits |

29 NURS 301
29 NURS 463 |

BIO 4076
(On-line section available)
Or
BIO 4093 |University of Iowa
096:116 EXW
Intro. To Human Genetics
3 Sem. Hrs
Arapahoe Comm. Coll.
BIO 115 Human Genetics
3 Sem. Hrs
Brigham Young Univ.
Genetics and reproduction
PWS 275
Prereq. any bio course |

ZOO 342 |

28 BIOL 302 |

34 BIOL 302 |

BIO 235 | | |
Nutrition & Disease
2 credits |
29 NURS 206
(Spring quarter only) | |Coll. Of Southern Idaho
Therapeutic Nutrition
NURP 113
Jackson (MI) Comm. College
Normal/Therapeutic Nutrition
3 sem. hrs.
NUR 207 | | | | | | |
Nutrition for Health
2 credits |
29 NURS 200 |
DT 1202
(On-line section available) |Brigham Young Univ.
Essentials of Nutrition 1
NDFS-100
3 credits |
KNH 102 | |
34 ALH 279 |
DIT 129 |
HOSP 153 | | - In addition to this list, please note that there is also a Statistics course requirement. - For Pathophysiology: Ohio State’s Allied Med or AMP 505 and 506 (Principles of Disease I and II) will satisfy the requirement.

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