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Motility Testing

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Submitted By ebonynoel78
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A. Define the following terms:
1. Monotrichous: a single flagellum at one pole of the cell
2. Amphitrichous: one flagellum at both poles of the cell
3. Lophotrichous: two or more flagellum at one or both ends of the cell
4. Peritrichous: many flagella surrounding the cell
B. What are the three commonly used techniques to test motility? Direct observation, motility media, and flagella staining
C. Why are semi-solid media used to test for motility? The agar is soft enough to allow motility to occur.
D. Why might it be difficult to observe motility in a wet mount? When wet mounts are used older cultures can be mixed with inactive specimen which makes motility difficult to observe. Additionally, newer specimen creates a viewing problem because of their fast motility.
E. Why is it important to use a needle rather than an inoculating loop when inoculating a motility tube? An inoculating loop is used to transfer specimen in a liquid medium or plating. Whereas the inoculating needle is used to transfer the specimen to the soft agar medium. Using a needle to inoculate a motility tube creates a sharp and well defined stab line. This allows for growth to move along the stab line to become visible which indicates that the specimen in non-motile.
F. For which of the organisms on the wet mount, if any, were you able to observe motility? E. coli exhibited motility whereas S. epidermidis did not.
G. For which of the organisms in the motility medium tubes, if any, were you able to observe motility? The medium was very turbid for E. coli and not for S. epidermidis. Therefore,E. coli exhibited motility whereas S. epidermidis did not. Experiment Motility Testing
H. Did your direct and indirect observations of motility show the same results? If they didn’t, why do you think this is the case? E. coli is a motile bacterium because contains flagella. The S.…...

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