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My Spirituality and the Christian Tradition

In: Religion Topics

Submitted By notserious
Words 398
Pages 2
My Spirituality and The Christian Tradition Though I cannot say I am a Christian, I can say that some Christian traditions and values have stuck with me throughout the years out of respect and habit. I still attend church and do prayer before eating when I am invited by some of the more religious members of my family. Holidays such as Christmas or Easter are still celebrated and still contain some religious flavoring depending on who I am celebrating with. Outside of holidays and dinners with devout friends and family, everything I do generally is secular. I now realize that I pretty much only partake in religious occasions when I feel it is necessitated to appease the more devout in my family and sphere of contacts. I cannot directly correlate my own spirituality with the Christian Tradition as I am not exactly a believer. I think of myself as more of a skeptic on the whole thing even though I was brought up as a Baptist. As stated before, I do celebrate Christian holidays but in a more secular family-orientated light. Some Christian values I do try to keep as they generally are in line with what I believe in such as "turning the other cheek" and unconditional love even when such relations are strained. I see them as more guidelines than a set rules as it is impossible to stay on the straight and narrow throughout life as things change so one most bend with the times but not so much as to forget the shape one once was. Outside of those few things I just try to be a good person and do no harm to others around me and try to help those people who need it. The world can be a rather nasty place and I feel that we need to try to help each other out when we can or at least not add another thing on the list of daily worries for everyone else. Compassion and empathy are two things that I try to have for others. Jesus went about helping others and Corinthians 1:3-7...

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