Premium Essay

Native Americans by European Powers by Many Different Types of Cultures

In: English and Literature

Submitted By Fowlers6
Words 895
Pages 4
Evelyn Fowler
AMH2070
MIDTERM ESSAY
February 6, 2013

I am going to explain the compare and contrasting treatments of Native Americans by European Powers by many different types of cultures. We will descuss how badly the Native Americans was treated and how they had to overcome so much. I will also explain which methods was effective and which ones was not effective. The story of the Native American has been marked mainly by betrayal and sorrow towards them. Ever since the white men from across the ocean set foot onto this land, the Native American has lost almost everything including ancestral lands, dignity, and even their culture have fallen by the wayside. How interesting it is that the people who came to this land first are the ones who have been short changed. Native Americans have been ridiculed. The stereotype of the dirty dealin' Injun" is just one of numerous examples. This has not helped the Native Americans in any way. Slowly, things are getting better, but only slowly. It ended up tearing the Native Americans away from their land that they called Sacred which was not helpful and right by no means. The Cherokee called this land from Georgia to Oklahoma the Trail of Tears. Native American history is nothing but a trail of tears stretching through five centuries of horror and betrayal of the Native American. The Spanish and Native Americans date back to when Christopher Columbus discovered New World on October 14, 1492. He met with the Tainos which led him to claiming the Island of Spain. He also kidnapped some of the Tainos because they never would have agreed to return to Spain. Columbus ended up becoming a Governor of Santo Domingo which people have said that he was not a good governor at all. During this time they enslaved all the Tainos. Since they had given him gold when he first came, he...

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Black Robe

...Huron village. This group includes Chomina who is an older, experienced traveller who has dreams; his wife and Annuka their daughter. Daniel and Annuka fall in love, to the discomfort of the celibate LaForgue. The group met with a band of Montagnais Native Americans who have never met Frenchmen before. The Montagnais shaman is suspicious of LaForgue's influence over the Algonquins. He accuses him of being a devil. He encourages Chomina and the other Algonquins to abandon the two Frenchmen and travel instead to a winter hunting lodge. LaForgue accepts his fate, but Daniel is determined to stay with Annuka and follows the Indians. There was an attempt Daniel’s life by one of the Indians, Chomina is consumed by guilt at having betrayed Champlain's trust. He and a few other members of the Algonquin tribe return with Daniel to try to find LaForgue. As they recover LaForgue, a party of Native Americans attacks them, killing Chomina's wife and taking the rest captive. They are taken to an Native American fortress, where they are forced to run the gauntlet, to watch Chomina's young son killed. Annuka seduces their guard, allowing them to overpower him and escape. Chomina, dying of a wound from his capture, sees a small grove he has dreamed of many times before, and realizes it is the place he is destined to die. LaForgue tries,...

Words: 930 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

American Indians

...A Review of North American Indians North American Indians: A Comprehensive Account In her book North American Indians: A Comprehensive Account, Alice Kehoe appears to give a straightforward account of the history of North America from the point of view of the Native Americans. The textbook covers the periods from when humans first inhabited the North American continent, some fifteen thousand years ago, and continues through to the present. Due to the immense size and diversity of the North American continent, the text is written so that each chapter covers a geographical region of the continent. The regions covered range from the rich lands of Mexico, through the eastern and western United States, through the forests of Canada, and concluding at the Arctic Circle. Each chapter covers the region’s history, people, culture, ways of life, and the circumstance that caused its cultural identity to collapse. The book culminates with chapters on the trials and tribulations that the Native American nations will face as they enter into the twenty-first century and a chapter on how anthropologists view American Indians. The author emphasizes several key points and occurrences in the history of the natives of North America and their impact on the Indian populations. While her book discusses the heritages, languages, knowledge, technology, arts, and values that have been passed down through generations; it seems that Ms. Kehoe’s intention is to point out the......

Words: 2435 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

Review of North American Indians

...A Review of North American Indians North American Indians: A Comprehensive Account In her book North American Indians: A Comprehensive Account, Alice Kehoe appears to give a straightforward account of the history of North America from the point of view of the Native Americans. The textbook covers the periods from when humans first inhabited the North American continent, some fifteen thousand years ago, and continues through to the present. Due to the immense size and diversity of the North American continent, the text is written so that each chapter covers a geographical region of the continent. The regions covered range from the rich lands of Mexico, through the eastern and western United States, through the forests of Canada, and concluding at the Arctic Circle. Each chapter covers the region’s history, people, culture, ways of life, and the circumstance that caused its cultural identity to collapse. The book culminates with chapters on the trials and tribulations that the Native American nations will face as they enter into the twenty-first century and a chapter on how anthropologists view American Indians. The author emphasizes several key points and occurrences in the history of the natives of North America and their impact on the Indian populations. While her book discusses the heritages, languages, knowledge, technology, arts, and values that have been passed down through generations; it seems that Ms. Kehoe’s intention is to point out the......

Words: 2436 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

North American Indians

...North American Indians: A Comprehensive Account In her book North American Indians: A Comprehensive Account, Alice Kehoe appears to give a straightforward account of the history of North America from the point of view of the Native Americans. The textbook covers the periods from when humans first inhabited the North American continent, some fifteen thousand years ago, and continues through to the present. Due to the immense size and diversity of the North American continent, the text is written so that each chapter covers a geographical region of the continent. The regions covered range from the rich lands of Mexico, through the eastern and western United States, through the forests of Canada, and concluding at the Arctic Circle. Each chapter covers the region’s history, people, culture, ways of life, and the circumstance that caused its cultural identity to collapse. The book culminates with chapters on the trials and tribulations that the Native American nations will face as they enter into the twenty-first century and a chapter on how anthropologists view American Indians. The author emphasizes several key points and occurrences in the history of the natives of North America and their impact on the Indian populations. While her book discusses the heritages, languages, knowledge, technology, arts, and values that have been passed down through generations; it seems that Ms. Kehoe’s intention is to point out the injustices that have been perpetrated on the......

Words: 2429 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

Divercity

...Di Wu 2010–06–04 Chapter 6 native Americans In this chapter, we learn about history and development of Native American. This chapter consist of three parts , history of native; how federal polices effect on native American ; what situation the native American in today. After reading this chapter, I think racism is a very painful problem in the United States. of the first acts of racism in American was against the Native Americans. At first, the Native Americans were the Europeans’ friends. The Native Americans showed the Europeans how to farm, hunt and live off the land in this new America. As time went by and the Europeans became comfortable, they no longer need the Native American people. The Native American people were in the way, they had land that the growing population of the Europeans wanted and needed. This was the start of many treaties that the American Government would make the Native people, and the start for racism against them. Out of all the treaties that the American Government made with the Native People, they kept all of them, but the United States only kept half of the treaties. For federal policies, American government gives an immense amount of respect to such diverse cultures and groups, but where is the respect for the Indians. When the United States first became an independent nation, it adopted the European policies towards these native peoples, but over the course of two centuries the U.S. adapted its own widely varying policies regarding the......

Words: 2208 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

Native American

...Imagine being raised in a Native tribe off the East Coast of America. The year is 1398, surrounding you is a rich abundant land full of wild plants and animals. A close knit family where everyone shares, and greed is almost non existent. Day to day survival is what keeps the mind going, but it is never threatened. As you grow up you learn only of your people, and how the world was made for you and you must return the favor with respect. No one tells you your right or wrong, and there is no doubt in your beliefs being false. On a morning just like any other, you take to your hunting trail. It is very common land and you can walk this with your eyes closed without running into vegetation. The birds whistle a common tune, and you can feel and understand what kind of mood they are in. It is quite, but you can still hear and comprehend so many things as the world talks to you. Movement catches your eye and suddenly a great whitetail bucks jumps across the ravine in a non challant manor chasing does. This buck is known in the tribe, and a kill would bring great spiritual power to the people. The buck pauses as he encounters a new scent, thus creating a opportunity to srike. The crisp red oak bow bends to a rate of optimal power, the arrow which took a day to create is perfection as it sits on the stand. The release is smooth and the feathers cut through the air speeding to the target. It is a clean kill, a sacrificed to be made that does not go un appreciative. The 180lb......

Words: 2970 - Pages: 12

Premium Essay

Native American History

...Josphat Minja 29 September 2014 INTRODUCTION Culture is that aspect or part of our existence or life that makes us different to the majority of the world but similar to certain people. It is a way of life common to a particular group of people who share a collection of attitudes, beliefs and patterns of behavior that enable them to live together in harmony but at the same time setting them apart from other people. One such culture is that of the Native Americans. Native Americans have diverse and rich cultures that are based on a deep spiritual relationship with the land they live in and the natural resources. They have a history that is rich in strife, struggle and triumph. In fact, most of America’s modern life is considered to be adapted from native Indian cultures practiced many centuries ago. This then shows that there is a lot to be learned from the Native America cultures as well as their beliefs about their relationship to the natural world. This paper is aimed at analyzing the Native American culture and the European culture with an emphasis on their beliefs about the natural world as well as their agricultural techniques and how they relate to the modern world. Many of the familiar features in modern day America that may be taken for granted originated from the Native Americans. The peace pipe, moccasins, totem pole and the teepee are an example of integral pieces that wove together a large picture of the Native American culture. Everything from animals to plants to......

Words: 5174 - Pages: 21

Premium Essay

Three or More

...conducted on Native American reservations, specifically their relationship with the criminal justice system. The topics that will be discussed include rape, structural disadvantages and Native American violence, and finally how society views these issues through the context of difference, inequality, and division. Native Americans have been the victims of oppression since Europeans came to North America. Europeans considered themselves to be an advanced civilization, who created social constructions of young America. Europeans introduced the term race to already existing societies in America, by differentiating Native Americans by the color of their skin. Through time, these Native American societies accepted the constructs of race and were referred to as “us” versus “them” to distinguish which race they represented. As Europeans settlers began to expand their civilization over Native American territories, their hierarchical power grew as well. The way Europeans inherited this hierarchical power was due to their technology (e.g. guns, education, medicine, etc.) leaving many Native Americans powerless. The textbook, “Investigation Difference” by Vernon Anthony states, "…use difference as a resource as we have done so ably in the past, or we can use power, coercion, and hate to try to eradicate diversity from our country as many fundamentalist, militant, and radically conservation groups and individuals advocate" ( Anthony, pg. 5). After the European settlers dominated......

Words: 1592 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Colonization and the First Globalization

...person must first understand the definition of colonization. Simply put, colonization is an ongoing process of control by which a central system of power dominates the surrounding land and its components. This means that a foreign government moves into the land and seizes control; gaining power, natural resources, and a larger economy. In the year 1492, an Italian explorer by the name of Christopher Columbus set out on an expedition departing from Spain in search of a faster ocean route to reach Asia. Him and his crew set foot on an island in the Bahamas 36 days after deporting from Spain. While in the Bahamas, Columbus and his men visited a total of three islands and built a settlement on Hispaniola Island with salvaged wreckage from one of their ships. Convinced he had reached Asia, he then set sail back to Spain with the two remaining ships. Columbus failed to find what he set out for – a new route to Asia along with the riches it promised, and he passed away short of success in 1506. However, Columbus was still successful in other terms. He is credited with the discovery of the New World and opening the Americas for European colonization. Following Columbus’s discovery, European nations that were on the Atlantic Rim exploited the riches and resources of the Americas. Due to their region’s position in the Eurasian economy, Europeans were determined to gain access to the New World. The growing desire for raw materials in Europe, the competition between nations, the......

Words: 2308 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

Cultural Syncretism

...Compare and contrast the legacies of cultural syncretism in Africa and the Americas with the resistance to cultural change Westerners encountered in China and India. What cultural factors caused the differences in outcomes? What legacies have the differences in types of encounters and degrees of cultural change left today? Had syncretism not occurred in the Americas, how might modern culture be different? If cultural syncretism had taken root during early encounters in China or India, how might they be different today? The quest for wealth and power brought Europeans to Indian shores in 1498 when Vasco da Gama, the Portuguese voyager, arrived in Calicut (modern Kozhikode, Kerala) on the west coast. In their search for spices and Christian converts, the Portuguese challenged Arab supremacy in the Indian Ocean, and, with their galleons fitted with powerful cannons, set up a network of strategic trading posts along the Arabian Sea and the Persian Gulf. In 1510 the Portuguese took over the enclave of Goa, which became the center of their commercial and political power in India and which they controlled for nearly four and a half centuries. Economic competition among the European nations led to the founding of commercial companies in England (the East India Company, founded in 1600) and in the Netherlands (Verenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie--the United East India Company, founded in 1602), whose primary aim was to capture the spice trade by breaking the Portuguese monopoly in Asia...

Words: 6234 - Pages: 25

Free Essay

Guns, Germs and Steel

...some nations have so much material wealth while so many others have so little? This was the question Jared Diamond posed in his book Guns, Germs, and Steel. After identifying a point in time when all societies were roughly equal (over 13,000 years ago), Diamond identified the key variables that allowed some societies to develop highly complex, material-rich societies, while others developed at much slower rates. Guns, Germs, and Steel uncovers how Europeans came to dominate every other group on the planet by virtue of their access to what Diamond terms the “Agents of Conquest”: Guns, Germs, and Steel. Jared Diamond’s journey of discovery began on the island of Papua, New Guinea. There, in 1974, a local named Yali asked Diamond a deceptively simple question: "Why is it that you white people developed so much cargo (material goods), but we black people had little cargo (material goods) of our own?" Diamond realized that Yali's question penetrated the heart of a great mystery of human history -- the roots of global inequality. Why were Europeans the ones with all the cargo? Why had they taken over so much of the world, instead of the native people of New Guinea? How did Europeans end up with what Diamond terms the Agents of Conquest: Guns, Germs and Steel? It was these agents of conquest that allowed 168 Spanish conquistadors to defeat an Imperial Inca army of 80,000 in 1532, and set a pattern of European conquest which would continue up to the present......

Words: 3856 - Pages: 16

Premium Essay

Science

...the world. England had a very early Industrial Revolution and its development of machines and ships led to its vast overseas empire. Even during the centuries when Spain was the most powerful nation and its ships traveled the entire world, its war crafts and equipments could not match the British fleet and armies. For a while there was France, with its beautiful Revolution for liberty, equality and fraternity, spreading the power of the bourgeoisie all over Europe. Then arose Napoleon, the Revolution’s emperor, trying to conquer new lands and colonies for France. In the long run, he was no match for the British power either. His ships were blockaded and destroyed at sea and his weary armies were finally crushed at Waterloo in 1815. 1 Then there was Germany, united after many decades of Prussian-German internal feuds and external wars, trying to gain access to colonies already controlled by France and Great Britain. The First World War unleashed and England, then with France as its valiant ally and the timely intervention of the US armies in the European theater, could still prove its resiliency and...

Words: 3676 - Pages: 15

Premium Essay

American History Timeline Part 3

...Major Event/Epoch in American History Time Period/Date(s) Description and Significance of the People/Event(s) to American History 1) Describe three different American Indian cultures prior to colonization. 1200-1900 C.E. Great Indian societies such as the Aztec, Mayan, Inca, and Toltec would emerge. They had complex structures of government and built large cities. These cities would even be seen as impressive to the Europeans when they later arrived on the continent (Brands, Breen, Williams, Gross, 2012). The Aztecs were the most powerful of the Indians and expanded their empire as they conquered many other tribes all throughout what is now Mexico. The groups along the Atlantic coast were smaller in numbers and not as agriculturally advanced. These cultures were more peaceful and even had some democratic type qualities to them. Many of the Europeans first contact would be with these communities. 2) The effects of British colonization on the Native Americans. 1600’s Despite Columbus and other explorers going off to the New World, the British did not show any major interest until the late 1500’s. The most immediate effect of the arrival of British settlers was the issue of land. They were taking land and resources that were not their own. However with peaceful relations there was plenty of land for both early settlers and the Native Americans. Early contact between English settlers and Native Americans was not filled with hostility but was rather peaceful. Both parties were......

Words: 2935 - Pages: 12

Free Essay

Macro Essay- Why Are Tropical Countries so Poor?

...can be rationalized since European countries set up institutions in different locations with varying intentions. (Acemoglu, Johnson and Robinson 1370). By identifying the characteristics and the resulting influences of various colonial institutions, in addition to why different locations were more suitable for these separate institutions, it will become apparent as to why tropical countries turned out poorer than areas with temperate climates today. One type of colony set up by Europeans was an extractive state. “The main purpose of the extractive state was to transfer as much of the resources of the colony to the colonizer” (1370). These colonies were exploited by Europeans and didn’t offer institutions that protected their native citizens against the ruling government. Their existence was solely to produce profit for the elite, which was done through extracting the lands’ gold, silver, and cash crops (Easterly and Levine 8). The ruling government would generally extract these colonies valuables, then “set up a complex mercantilist system of monopolies and trade regulations to extract further resources from the colonies” (Acemoglu, Johnson and Robinson 1375). Since there was an overwhelming economic motive behind the colonization of these lands, Europeans would focus on controlling the colonies population by establishing an authoritarian state (1375). This was done with the intention of making as much profit as possible. A prime example of this type of colony is Mexico,......

Words: 2372 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

The Cultural Patterns of the Native American Groups Prior to European Colonization.

...of the Native American groups prior to European colonization. Even though Christopher Columbus claimed to have discovered the Americas in 1492, it was already inhabited some fifteen to twenty thousand years prior. The glaciers were reduced because of global warming and this gave the nomadic hunters access to the core of the North American continent. Amazingly, this contributed to their food supply abundantly and this produced a swift population growth. More changes became evident in the environment which included a new food source such as fish, nuts and berries. These Native Americans, known as Paleo-Indians, adjusted and propelled forward. Because they were exposed to a new food source they discovered how to cultivate certain plants. At this stage, the Agriculture Revolution was born and this significantly altered the Native American culture. With a more stable food source these Indians became docile and established. This also helped in establishing stable villages and eventually led to some type of government which included elders and leaders. The Eastern Woodland Cultures did not practice agriculture first and foremost but supplemented their food chain with hunting and fishing. They had settled in the northern region along the Atlantic coast. The Algonquian-speaking Natives resided from North Carolina to Main and spoke many different dialects depending on the region they were associated with. Furthermore, most Native American......

Words: 7887 - Pages: 32