Nike Cost of Capital

In: Business and Management

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Nike, Inc.: COST OF CAPITAL
CASE ANALYSIS



Importance of Cost of Capital

The concept of cost of capital is used in finance decisions.
Acceptance or rejection of an investment project depends on the cost that the company has to pay for financing it.
Good financial management calls for selection of such projects, which are expected to earn returns, which are higher than the cost of capital. It is therefore, important for the finance manager to calculate the cost of capital, which the company has to pay and compare it with the rate of return, which the project is expected to earn.
In capital expenditure decisions, finance managers go on accepting projects arranged in descending order of rate of return. The manager stops at the point where the cost of capital equals to the rate of return offered by the project. That is, the finance manager finds out the break-even point of the project. Accepting any project beyond the break-even point will cause financial loss for the company. The cost of capital is a guideline for determining the optimum capital structure of a company.
Weighted Average Cost of Capital
The weighted average cost of capital (WACC) is the rate that a company is expected to pay on average to all its security holders to finance its assets.
The WACC is the minimum return that a company must earn on an existing asset base to satisfy its creditors, owners, and other providers of capital.
A company's assets are financed by either debt or equity. WACC is the average of the costs of these sources of financing, each of which is weighted by its respective use in the given situation. By taking a weighted average, we can see how much interest the company has to pay for every dollar it finances.
A firm's WACC is the overall required return on the firm as a whole and, as such, it is often used internally by company…...

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