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BTEC
Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Diplomas in Sport
For first teaching from September 2006 Issue 2 March 2007

Specification

Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Diplomas in

Sport

Edexcel, a Pearson company, is the UK’s largest awarding body offering academic and vocational qualifications and testing to more than 25,000 schools, colleges, employers and other places of learning here and in over 100 countries worldwide. We deliver 9.4 million exam scripts each year, with 3 million marked onscreen in 2005. Our qualifications include GCSE, AS and A Level, GNVQ, NVQ and the BTEC suite of vocational qualifications from entry level to BTEC Higher National Diplomas and Foundation Degrees. We also manage the data collection, marking and distribution of the National Curriculum Tests at Key Stages 2 and 3, and the Year 7 Progress Tests.

References to third party material made in this specification are made in good faith. Edexcel does not endorse, approve or accept responsibility for the content of materials, which may be subject to change, or any opinions expressed therein. (Material may include textbooks, journals, magazines and other publications and websites.)

Authorised by Jim Dobson Prepared by Dominic Sutton Publications Code BF017349 All the material in this publication is copyright © Edexcel Limited 2007

Essential principles for delivering a BTEC
This specification contains the rules and regulations along with the units and associated guidance to enable centres to deliver a programme of learning for the Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Diplomas in Sport. The qualification structures set out the permitted combination of units learners need to complete the qualification. Each unit sets out the intended outcomes along with the content and also includes advice and guidance regarding appropriate delivery and assessment strategies. The following generic principles need to be adhered to in order that a BTEC qualification is delivered to the appropriate standard. • The specification provides necessary information for the successful delivery and achievement of the units and the qualification as a whole. Consequently, the specification is of importance to the learner and tutor alike. The individual units may be delivered and studied in isolation but the learner and the deliverer should have access to the full information provided to support the programme of learning. • Centres need to make regular use of the Edexcel website (www.edexcel.org.uk) to ensure that they have the most up to date information. In particular, the requirements relating to the external verification of the qualification receive regular updates and appropriate information for centres is posted on the website. It is the responsibility of the centre to ensure that they are familiar with the latest BTEC NQF Level 2/3 (including Short Courses at Levels 1–3) Handbook and that they implement any related policy documentation which may have been posted on the website. • This specification contains details of the assessment and quality assurance procedures. It includes advice about Edexcel’s policy regarding access to its qualifications, the design of programmes of study and delivery modes. Centres must ensure that they conform to the policies outlined in the specification. • Centres are required to recruit learners to BTEC qualifications with integrity. This includes ensuring that applicants have appropriate information and advice about the qualifications and that the qualification will meet their needs. Centres should take appropriate steps to assess each applicant’s potential and make a professional judgement about their ability to be able to successfully complete the programme of study and achieve the qualification. • Centres are required to use the information in this specification to develop and deliver a programme of learning that will enable learners to achieve the grading criteria stipulated in the unit grading grids. Assessment assignments should ensure coverage of all criteria in the unit as set out in the Grading Grid for each unit. Assignments constructed by centres should be valid, reliable and fit for purpose, building on the application of the grading criteria. Centres should use a variety of assessment methods, including case studies, assignments and work-based assessments, along with projects, performance observation and time-constrained assessments. Further guidance relating to the setting of assignments is available in the Getting Started publication which is available on the Edexcel website (www.edexcel.org.uk). • Centres are encouraged to place emphasis on the practical application of the grading criteria, providing wherever possible a realistic scenario for learners to work with, and making maximum use of, practical activities and work experience. The creation of assignments that are fit for purpose is vital to the learner’s achievement and their importance cannot be over emphasised.

• These qualifications have been accredited to the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) and are eligible for public funding as determined by the DfES under Sections 96 and 97 of the Learning and Skills Act 2000. Details of the qualification units can be seen on the QCA Open Qualifications database (www.qca.org.uk). • The qualification titles feature in the funding lists published annually by the DfES and the regularly updated website www.dfes.gov.uk/. The NQF Qualification Accreditation Numbers (QANs) should be used by centres when they wish to seek public funding for their learners. The QANs for these qualifications are listed in Annexe A. • This specification is accredited by the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority until 31st December 2008. Edexcel may update this specification during its period of accreditation and centres need to refer to the Edexcel website for the latest issue of the specification. Centres that have not previously offered BTEC qualifications must apply for, and be granted, centre approval before they can apply for approval to offer the programme. When a centre applies for approval to offer a BTEC qualification they will be required to enter into an ‘approvals agreement’. The approvals agreement is a formal commitment by the head or principal of a centre to meet all the requirements of the specification and linked codes or regulations.

Contents

What are BTEC Firsts?
BTEC First Diploma BTEC First Certificate National Occupational Standards Key features of the BTEC Firsts in Sport Rationale of the BTEC Firsts in Sport

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1 1 1 2 2

Structure of the qualification
Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate in Sport Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Diploma in Sport (Performance) Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Diploma in Sport (Exercise and Fitness) Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Diploma in Sport (Outdoor Education)

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3 3 4 4

Unit format Units
Unit 1: The Body in Sport Unit 2: Health, Safety and Injury in Sport Unit 3: The Sports Industry Unit 4: Preparation for Sport Unit 5: Planning and Leading Sports Activities Unit 6: Practical Sport Unit 7: Practical Outdoor and Adventurous Activities Unit 8: Technical Skills and Tactical Awareness for Sport Unit 9: Psychology for Sports Performance Unit 10: Nutrition for Sports Performance Unit 11: Fitness for Sports Performance Unit 12: Lifestyle and Sports Performance Unit 13: Work-based Project in Sport Unit 14: Instructing Exercise and Fitness Unit 15: Sport and Leisure Facility Operations Unit 16: Leading Outdoor and Adventurous Activities Unit 17: Expedition Experience

5 7

9 17 23 29 35 45 53 61 71 79 87 95 103 113 121 129 137

Assessment and grading Quality assurance
Approval Risk assessment Internal verification External verification

145 146

146 146 146 146

Calculation of the qualification grade
Awarding a qualification grade School and College Achievement and Attainment Tables (SCAAT) equivalence

147

147 148

Programme design and delivery
Mode of delivery Resources Delivery approach Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) Meeting local needs Limitations on variations from standard specifications

149

149 149 150 150 150 150

Access and recruitment
Restrictions on learner entry Access arrangements and special considerations

151

151 151

The Edexcel BTEC Qualification Framework for the Active 152 Leisure and Learning sector Further information Useful publications
How to obtain National Occupational Standards

153 153

153

Professional development and training Annexe A
QCA codes

154 155

155

Annexe B
Grading domains

157

157

Annexe C
Key skills Key skills mapping — summary of opportunities suggested in each unit

159

159 160

Annexe D
National Occupational Standards/mapping with NVQs

161

161

Annexe E
Wider curriculum mapping

163

163

What are BTEC Firsts?
BTEC qualifications are designed to provide specialist work-related qualifications in a range of sectors. They have been developed to provide the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to prepare learners for employment and/or to provide career development opportunities for those already in work. Consequently they provide a course of study for fulltime or part-time learners in schools, colleges and training centres. They link to the National Occupational Standards for the sector, where these are appropriate, and are supported by the relevant Standards Setting Body (SSB) or Sector Skills Council (SSC). On successful completion of a BTEC First qualification, learners may progress into or within employment and/or continue their study in the vocational area.

BTEC First Diploma
The Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Diploma is a 360 guided learning hour qualification comprising core and specialist units which cover aspects of knowledge, understanding and competency necessary for employment within the sector. As such the BTEC First Diploma offers a qualification which can extend a learner’s programme of study and provide vocational emphasis within their programme of study. Equally, the BTEC First Diploma offers a focused qualification for learners who wish to follow a programme of study that is directly related to their work experience, or to an aspect of employment that they wish to move into in due course.

BTEC First Certificate
The Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate is a 180 guided learning hour qualification which offers a bite-sized opportunity for learners to experience a vocational qualification. The BTEC First Certificate offers a focused vocational qualification for learners who wish to follow a shorter programme of study related to an aspect of employment that they might wish to move into; or a taster qualification which can extend their programme of study and provide an initial experience of a vocational area. This will also enable learners to progress to a higher level qualification relevant to the sector.

National Occupational Standards
BTEC Firsts are designed to relate to the National Occupational Standards (NOS) in the sector, which in turn form the basis of the National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs). BTEC Firsts do not purport to deliver occupational competence in the sector, which should be demonstrated in a work context. However, the qualifications provide much of the underpinning knowledge for the NOS, as well as developing practical skills in preparation for work and possible achievement of NVQs in due course. Each unit identifies relevant aspects of the NOS that are addressed by the outcomes and content of the unit. The Edexcel Level 2 BTEC Firsts in Sport relate to: • • • • • • Edexcel Level 1 NVQ in Sport, Recreation and Allied Occupations Edexcel Level 2 NVQ in Activity Leadership Edexcel Level 2 NVQ in Coaching, Teaching and Instructing Edexcel Level 2 NVQ in Instructing Exercise and Fitness Edexcel Level 2 NVQ in Operational Services Edexcel Level 3 NVQ in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance.

BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

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Key features of the BTEC Firsts in Sport
The BTEC Firsts in Sport have been developed to focus on: • education and training for those working in the sport sector • providing opportunities for those working in the sport sector to achieve a nationally recognised Level 2 vocationally specific qualification • providing opportunities for learners to gain a nationally recognised vocationally specific qualification to enter employment in the sport sector or to progress to further qualifications such as the Edexcel Level 3 BTEC Nationals in Sport and Sport and Exercise Sciences • providing opportunities for learners to develop a range of skills and techniques, personal qualities and attitudes essential for successful performance in working life.

Rationale of the BTEC Firsts in Sport
The BTEC Firsts in Sport have been designed to build on learning from Key Stage 3, for those that may wish to explore a vocational route throughout Key Stage 4, and in post-16 education. They provide a suitable foundation for further study within the sector through progression on to qualifications such as the Edexcel Level 3 BTEC Nationals in Sport and Sport and Exercise Sciences. These qualifications are suitable for school leavers who wish to embark on a vocational route through training or education following on from GCSEs or a vocational qualification at Level 1. BTEC Firsts are ‘mode-free’ and as such allow those already employed in the sport sector to study for the Certificate or Diploma on a part-time basis, using industry knowledge, gained in the workplace, and expertise to develop evidence for the assessment criteria. The Certificate is designed to give learners a basic grounding in understanding and knowledge of the sector. Learners studying for a Diploma may choose to specialise in an area such as sports performance or exercise and fitness. The assessment approach of the BTEC Firsts in Sport allows for learners to receive feedback on their progress throughout the course as they provide evidence towards the grading criteria. Evidence for assessment may be generated through a range of diverse activities including workplace assessment, role play and oral presentation. Delivery strategies should reflect the nature of work within the sport sector, by encouraging learners to conduct research, and carry out assessment, in the workplace, or in simulated working conditions, wherever possible. Learners should be encouraged to take responsibility for their own learning and achievement, taking into account industry standards for behaviour and performance. Learners completing these qualifications may seek employment within the sport sector at a junior level in a range of roles including recreation assistant or sports leader.

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BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

Structure of the qualification
Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate in Sport
The Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate in Sport consists of three units, which must include at least one of the specified core units, that provide for a combined total of 180 guided learning hours (GLH) for the completed qualification. Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate in Sport Unit 1 2 Unit 3 4 5 6 7 Core units — at least one of these units must be taken The Body in Sport Health, Safety and Injury in Sport Specialist units — enough units must be taken from the following to make a total of three units overall The Sports Industry Preparation for Sport Planning and Leading Sports Activities Practical Sport* Practical Outdoor and Adventurous Activities* 60 60 60 60 60 2 2 2 2 2 GLH 60 60 Level 2 2

*Learners may only take either Unit 6 or Unit 7. They may not take both.

Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Diploma in Sport (Performance)
The Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Diploma in Sport (Performance) consists of two core units, plus four specialist units, that provide for a combined total of 360 guided learning hours (GLH) for the completed qualification. Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Diploma in Sport (Performance) Unit 1 2 Unit 3 6 8 9 10 11 12 Core units — both of these units must be taken The Body in Sport Health, Safety and Injury in Sport Specialist units — four of the following must be taken The Sports Industry Practical Sport Technical Skills and Tactical Awareness for Sport Psychology for Sports Performance Nutrition for Sports Performance Fitness for Sports Performance Lifestyle and Sports Performance 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 GLH 60 60 Level 2 2

BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

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Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Diploma in Sport (Exercise and Fitness)
The Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Diploma in Sport (Exercise and Fitness) consists of two core units, plus four specialist units, that provide for a combined total of 360 guided learning hours (GLH) for the completed qualification. Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Diploma in Sport (Exercise and Fitness) Unit 1 2 Unit 3 4 5 6 7 13 14 15 Core units — both units must be taken The Body in Sport Health, Safety and Injury in Sport Specialist units — four of the following must be taken The Sports Industry Preparation for Sport Planning and Leading Sports Activities Practical Sport* Practical Outdoor and Adventurous Activities* Work-based Project in Sport Instructing Exercise and Fitness Sport and Leisure Facility Operations 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 GLH 60 60 Level 2 2

* Learners may only take either Unit 6 or Unit 7. They may not take both.

Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Diploma in Sport (Outdoor Education)
The Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Diploma in Sport (Outdoor Education) consists of two core units, plus four specialist units, that provide for a combined total of 360 guided learning hours (GLH) for the completed qualification. Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Diploma in Sport (Outdoor Education) Unit 1 2 Unit 3 4 7 13 16 17 Core units — both units must be taken The Body in Sport Health, Safety and Injury in Sport Specialist units — four of the following must be taken The Sports Industry Preparation for Sport Practical Outdoor and Adventurous Activities Work-based Project in Sport Leading Outdoor and Adventurous Activities Expedition Experience 60 60 60 60 60 60 2 2 2 2 2 2 GLH 60 60 Level 2 2

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BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

Unit format
All units in Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First qualifications have a standard format which is designed to provide clear guidance on the requirements of the qualification for learners, tutors, assessors and those responsible for monitoring national standards. Each unit is set out in the following way. Unit title The unit title is accredited by QCA and this form of words will appear on the learner’s Notification of Performance (NOP). In BTEC First qualifications each unit consists of 30, 60, 90 or 120 guided learning hours NQF level This is the level of study of the qualification as determined by the National Qualifications Framework (NQF). Guided learning hours Guided learning hours is ‘a notional measure of the substance of a unit’. It includes an estimate of time that might be allocated to direct teaching, instruction and assessment, together with other structured learning time such as directed assignments or supported individual study. It excludes learner-initiated private study. Centres are advised to consider this definition when planning the programme of study associated with this specification. Unit abstract The unit abstract is designed to give the reader an appreciation of the value of the unit in the vocational setting of the qualification as well as highlighting the focus of the unit. It provides the reader with a snapshot of the aims of the unit and the key knowledge, skills and understanding developed while studying the unit. The unit abstract also emphasises links to the sector by describing what the unit offers the sector. Learning outcomes Learning outcomes state exactly what a learner should ‘know, understand or be able to do’ as a result of completing the unit. Unit content The unit content identifies the depth and breadth of knowledge, skills and understanding needed to design and deliver a programme of learning sufficient to achieve each of the learning outcomes. This is informed by the underpinning knowledge and understanding requirements of the related National Occupational Standards (NOS). The content provides the range of subject material for the programme of learning and specifies the skills, knowledge and understanding required for achievement of the pass grading criteria. Each learning outcome is stated in full and then the prescribed key phrases or concepts related to that learning outcome are listed in italics followed by the subsequent range of related topics. The unit content section will often have lists of topics that provide the range of the subject material required to be covered in order to meet the grading criteria. Subject material maybe further detailed by lists enclosed within brackets or an elongated dash which provide the defined elements of the specific topic item. Where the subject material list includes an ‘eg’, it should be noted that this provides an indicative range of material to support the specific topic item.

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Grading grid Each Grading grid contains statements of the criteria used to determine the evidence that each learner must produce in order to receive a pass, merit or distinction grade. It is important to note that the merit and distinction grading criteria refer to a qualitative improvement in the learner’s evidence. Essential guidance for tutors This section is designed to give tutors additional guidance and amplification on the unit in order to provide for a coherence of understanding and a consistency of delivery and assessment. It is divided into the following sections: • Delivery — explains the content and its relationship with the learning outcomes and offers guidance about possible approaches to delivery. This advice is based on the more usual delivery modes but is not intended to rule out alternative approaches. • Assessment — provides amplification about the nature and type of evidence that learners need to produce in order to pass the unit or achieve the higher grades. This section should be read in conjunction with the grading criteria. • Links to National Occupational Standards, other BTEC units, other BTEC qualifications and other relevant units and qualifications — sets out links with other units within the qualification. These could be used to ensure that learners can relate different aspects within the qualification and offer opportunities for integration of learning, delivery and assessment. Links to the Occupational Standards will be highlighted here. • Essential resources — identifies any specialist resources needed to allow learners to generate the evidence required for each unit. The centre will be asked to ensure that any requirements are in place when it seeks approval from Edexcel to offer the qualification. • Indicative reading for learners — provides a short list of learner resource material that benchmark the level of study. Key skills This section identifies where there may be opportunities within the unit for the generation of evidence to meet the requirements of key skills units. Assessors should take care to become familiar with the key skills specifications and evidence requirements and not to rely on the contents of this section when presenting key skills evidence for moderation. Centres should refer to the QCA website (www.qca.org.uk) for the latest version of the key skills standards.

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BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

Units
Unit 1: The Body in Sport Unit 2: Health, Safety and Injury in Sport Unit 3: The Sports Industry Unit 4: Preparation for Sport Unit 5: Planning and Leading Sports Activities Unit 6: Practical Sport Unit 7: Practical Outdoor and Adventurous Activities Unit 8: Technical Skills and Tactical Awareness for Sport Unit 9: Psychology for Sports Performance Unit 10: Nutrition for Sports Performance Unit 11: Fitness for Sports Performance Unit 12: Lifestyle and Sports Performance Unit 13: Work-based Project in Sport Unit 14: Instructing Exercise and Fitness Unit 15: Sport and Leisure Facility Operations Unit 16: Leading Outdoor and Adventurous Activities Unit 17: Expedition Experience 9 17 23 29 35 45 53 61 71 79 87 95 103 113 121 129 137

BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

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BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

UNIT 1: THE BODY IN SPORT

Unit 1:
NQF Level 2:

The Body in Sport
BTEC First

Guided learning hours: 60

Unit abstract
A healthy body is an amazing piece of machinery which allows us to go from total rest to all out sprinting in a matter of seconds. Trained sports people are able to run, cycle and swim marathon distances. This ability is due to the efficiency of the physiological systems that work together to allow such activity. An understanding of these systems is imperative in the sport and exercise industries in order to begin to appreciate how the body copes with the stress of exercise, why we cannot continue to exercise indefinitely, and how we can train these systems. This unit explores the foundations of anatomy and physiology. It provides the learner with an understanding of the structure and function of the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular and respiratory systems. The short and long-term effects of exercise on each of these systems are examined. Wherever possible, examples of sports and exercises particular to learners’ specific pathways should be used. An outline of the energy systems and the energy requirements of a range of sports is also covered. This part of the unit is only intended to provide the learner with the ability to recognise which sports use either the aerobic or the anaerobic energy systems and which ones require more energy than others.

Learning outcomes
On completion of this unit a learner should: 1 2 3 4 5 Understand the skeleton and how it is affected by exercise Understand the muscular system and how it is affected by exercise Understand the cardiovascular system and how it is affected by exercise Understand the respiratory system and how it is affected by exercise Know the fundamentals of the energy systems.

BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

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Unit content

1

Understand the skeleton and how it is affected by exercise Structure of the skeletal system: bones (skull, sternum, ribs, vertebral column, clavicle, scapula, humerus, radius, ulna, pelvis, femur, tibia, fibula, patella); joints, classifications (fixed, slightly moveable, freely moveable/synovial), synovial joints (types, structure, function and range of movement) Function of the skeletal system: protection; movement; shape; support; blood production; bone growth eg osteoblasts, osteoclasts, epiphyseal plate, physiological zones of bone growth Movement: flexion; extension; adduction; abduction; rotation; examples from relevant sporting movements eg the effects of speed on posture Effects of exercise: long and short-term effects; on bones eg increase in bone density; on synovial joints eg increased thickness of hyaline cartilage, greater production of synovial fluid

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Understand the muscular system of the body and how it is affected by exercise Major muscles: triceps; biceps; quadriceps; hamstrings; deltoids; gluteus maximus; gastrocnemius; abdominals; obliques; pectorals; trapezius; erector spinae; classification; location Types of muscle: voluntary (skeletal); involuntary (smooth); heart (cardiac) Muscle movement: tendons; antagonistic pairs; types of movement (concentric, eccentric, isometric) Effects of exercise: short-term effects of exercise eg break down of muscle tissue; long-term effects of exercise eg hypertrophy

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Understand the cardiovascular system and how it is affected by exercise Structure of the cardiovascular system: atria; ventricles; septum; tricuspid; bicuspid; semilunar valves; main blood vessels leading into and out of the heart (aorta, pulmonary vein, pulmonary artery and vena cavae); blood vessels (structure and function); arteries; arterioles; capillaries; veins and venuoles Function of the cardiovascular system: blood flow through the heart and to the body and lungs; taking up oxygen and ‘unloading’ carbon dioxide; thermoregulation Effects of exercise: short-term effects of exercise eg increased heart rate, increased blood pressure; long-term effects of exercise eg decreased heart rate, increased stroke volume, increased size of heart

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UNIT 1: THE BODY IN SPORT

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Understand the respiratory system and how it is affected by exercise Structure of the respiratory system: epiglottis; trachea; bronchus; bronchioles; alveoli; diaphragm; intercostal muscles Function of the respiratory system: mechanics of breathing (inspiration and expiration); gaseous exchange Effects of exercise: short-term effects eg increased breathing rate; long-term effects eg increased vital capacity

5

Know the fundamentals of the energy systems Energy systems: anaerobic energy system (alactic acid, lactic acid), sports that use this system to provide energy eg sprinting 60m or 400m; aerobic energy system (requirement of oxygen), sports that use this system to provide energy eg long distance running Energy requirements of physical activity: calories used taking part in different forms of physical activity eg swimming, sprinting, walking

BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

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UNIT 1: THE BODY IN SPORT

Grading grid

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all of the learning outcomes for the unit. The criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit.

Grading criteria To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to: M1 identify the movement occurring at synovial joints during three different types of physical activity M2 explain the effects of exercise on bones and joints M3 give examples of different types of muscular contraction relating to four different types of physical activity M4 explain the effects of exercise on the cardiovascular system M5 explain the effects of exercise on the respiratory system M6 explain the energy requirements of four different types of physical activity. To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to: D1 analyse four sporting movements, detailing the musculoskeletal actions occuring, and the contractions that are necessary D2 analyse the effects of exercise on the musculoskeletal system D3 analyse the effects of exercise on the cardiorespiratory system.

To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

P1 describe the structure and function of the skeleton, and how bones grow

P2 identify the effects of exercise on bones and joints

P3 describe the different types of muscle, the major muscles in the body, and how muscles move

P4 identify the effects of exercise on skeletal muscles

P5 describe the structure and function of the cardiovascular system and how it is affected by exercise

P6 describe the structure and function of the respiratory system and how it is affected by exercise

P7 identify two types of physical activity that use the aerobic energy system and two that use the anaerobic energy systems.

Guidance to support the assessment of this unit is available on page 13.

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UNIT 1: THE BODY IN SPORT

Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery The aim of this unit is to give learners a good understanding of the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, and a very basic knowledge of energy systems. A wide range of delivery methods should be used to teach this unit including lectures, tutorials, presentations, videos, worksheets, anatomy models, laboratory work and internet sources. There will be a great deal of scientific anatomical language, that may be quite daunting for learners. Therefore, it is important that this unit is ‘taught’. The study of the skeletal system requires the use of diagrams of the skeleton and preferably a life-sized hinged model skeleton. Disarticulated bones and models of human joints should also be accessible. X-rays can also be used to illustrate the different bones in the skeleton, bone growth and even the effects of exercise on the skeleton. Dissection of an animal joint may help to demonstrate the components of a synovial joint. The study of the muscular system requires pictures of, or access to, microscopes and slides of cardiac, voluntary and involuntary muscles in order for learners to see the differences between the tissues. Diagrams of the muscular system showing all the named muscles will also be required. In order for learners to understand the concept of muscles working in antagonistic pairs, it would be useful for them to watch a video, or relevant internet sites, that shows how the muscles relax and contract as a pair. To gain an understanding of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems learners could use laboratory work in which they watch, or take part in performing, the dissection of animal hearts and lungs. Again, labelled diagrams, either printed on worksheets, or on overhead transparencies, should be used to show the anatomical structures of the heart, circulatory and respiratory systems. Learners only need a basic understanding of the energy systems. They need to be made aware that there are two main systems in place: the aerobic and the anaerobic systems. This can be presented through theoretical teaching or presentations with overhead transparencies. This can then be reinforced through practical sessions in which learners take part in a range of sports and try to determine which system is supplying the energy. During these sessions they may also attempt to establish which sports use the most energy. Assessment It is possible to assess this unit through a small number of structured tasks. In one task the learner can investigate the skeleton by identifying bones and joints on a worksheet and then carrying out an investigation into bone growth and the effects of exercise on the skeleton. Learners could prepare a laboratory report for evidence relating to the muscular system in which they use prepared slides and microscopes to investigate the differences between cardiac, voluntary and skeletal muscle. Identification of all the named skeletal muscles could be carried out using muscle diagrams. With regard to demonstrating an understanding of muscle movement, learners could be asked to examine a range of relevant basic sporting movements and identify the muscles, and the types of muscle contraction involved, eg in a football kick: hamstrings, concentric contraction, knee flexion, quadriceps concentric contraction, knee extension.

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UNIT 1: THE BODY IN SPORT

Learners could then be asked to hand draw and label the heart and the respiratory system which will ensure that they are not simply using pre-drawn work from the internet or textbooks. They will then need to explore how both systems respond to exercise. More practical work could be carried out to explore the short-term effects of exercise. Learners could take their own heart and breathing rates at rest, immediately before exercise and during the first few minutes of exercise. These results can then be discussed and compared and written up as a report. Long-term effects of exercise could be researched and delivered as a presentation by learners. For the energy systems, learners could take part in a variety of different sports eg team games, swimming, running, racquet sports and produce a report in which they determine which sport they think uses the most energy. Alternatively, they could look through energy tables which show the calories required to take part in different sports for the same length of time. Links to National Occupational Standards, other BTEC units, other BTEC qualifications and other relevant units and qualifications This unit has links with Unit 2: Health, Safety and Injury in Sport, Unit 4: Preparation for Sport, Unit 11: Fitness for Sports Performance and Unit 14: Instructing Exercise and Fitness. This unit provides a progression route from the Edexcel Level 1 Edexcel Level 1 BTEC Introductory Certificate and Diploma in Sport and Leisure, and progression to the Edexcel Level 3 BTEC Nationals in Sport and Sport and Exercise Sciences. This unit has links to the National Occupational Standards at Level 2 in Instructing Exercise and Fitness, particularly Unit D41: Instruct a gym based session. This unit also covers much of the underpinning knowledge related to qualification/entry to the Register of Exercise Professionals. This unit provides learners with the opportunity to provide evidence for the key skills in communication. Essential resources The resources required to deliver the content of this unit are detailed in the delivery strategy. This may include laboratory equipment, models of the human skeleton and/or images relating to other body systems. Indicative reading for learners Materials that illustrate the level of learning required and that are particularly relevant. Tutors should be aware that textbooks are frequently updated and that they should use the latest editions where available. Examples currently include: Harris B et al — BTEC First Sport: Student Book (Heinemann, 2004) Honeybourne J — BTEC First in Sport (Nelson Thornes, 2005) Scott A — GCSE PE for Edexcel (Heinemann, 2001) Websites which may support the delivery of this unit include: GCSE Bitesize (Physical Education) www.bbc.co.uk/schools/bitesize/pe

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BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

UNIT 1: THE BODY IN SPORT

Key skills

Achievement of key skills is not a requirement of this qualification but it is encouraged. Suggestions of opportunities for the generation of level 2 key skill evidence are given here. Staff should check that learners have produced all the evidence required by part B of the key skills specifications when assessing this evidence. Learners may need to develop additional evidence elsewhere to fully meet the requirements of the key skills specifications.

Communication level 2 When learners are: • • discussing how the various body systems are affected by exercise describing how the various body systems are affected by exercise and presenting information relating to energy systems and use researching the energy demands of different forms of physical activity, and how various body systems are affected by exercise describing how the various body systems are affected by exercise. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: C2.1a C2.1b Take part in a group discussion Give a talk of at least four minutes



C2.2

Read and summarise information from at least two documents about the same subject. Each document must be a minimum of 500 words long.



C2.3

Write two different types of documents each one giving different information. One document must be at least 500 words long.

BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

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UNIT 1: THE BODY IN SPORT

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BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

UNIT 2: HEALTH, SAFETY AND INJURY IN SPORT

Unit 2:
NQF Level 2:

Health, Safety and Injury in Sport
BTEC First

Guided learning hours: 60

Unit abstract
Any person who takes part in sport is at risk of sustaining an injury. At the weekend, when sports participation is at its greatest, it is guaranteed that any hospital accident and emergency department will have more than its fair share of sports injuries to deal with. The acts of running, jumping and lifting weights places excess stress on the body and can lead to a range of sporting injuries. Also, once you take into account other participants, such those in a football game, injuries through collision and tackles are commonplace. Taking part in outdoor pursuits carries with it a high risk of injury, even when risk assessments are carried out and correct equipment is used. Therefore, it is very important that people who take part in sport, or wish to pursue a career in the sport sector, have a good grasp of health and safety and are able to deal with a range of basic sports injuries. This unit will provide the learner with a good understanding of health and safety issues relating to sports participation, and how they can take precautions to ensure sports participants avoid injury. Basic definitions of risks and hazards are explored within the unit. This is then followed by looking at the ways in which people, equipment and environmental factors may contribute towards injury. Rules and regulations specific to learners’ sport pathways are then covered, with a range of examples being provided. Learners will then choose the relevant ones and investigate them. Types of sporting injury are then examined. Again, injuries specific to learners’ sport pathways should be given eg outdoor pursuits pathway; shoulder dislocation from a kayaking manoeuvre. etc. The procedures which must be followed when dealing with an injury or illness for a range of participants are then covered, and again should be made relevant to the appropriate pathway. To complete the unit, learners will learn why, how and when they should carry out a risk assessment and how to adapt it if necessary. All learners will then be expected to complete a relevant risk assessment for their sport pathway.

Learning outcomes
On completion of this unit a learner should: 1 2 3 4 Know the different types of injuries and illness associated with sports participation Be able to deal with injuries and illnesses associated with sports participation Understand risks and hazards associated with sports participation Be able to undertake a risk assessment relevant to sport.

BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

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UNIT 2: HEALTH, SAFETY AND INJURY IN SPORT

Unit content

1

Know the different types of injuries and illness associated with sports participation Causes of injury: loading; intrinsic and extrinsic factors; over use; alignment and intensity; effect of levers; gravity and resistance Types of injuries: over-use injuries eg tendonitis, shin splints; dislocation; fractures (open and closed); strains; sprains; grazes; bruising; concussion; spinal injuries; blisters Types and signs of illness: eg asthma (wheezing and shortness of breath), heart attack (chest pain), viral infection (high temperature), hypoglycaemia (confusion)

2

Be able to deal with injuries and illnesses associated with sports participation Procedures and treatment: protection of casualty and other people from further risk; types of qualified assistance; ways in which to call for qualified assistance appropriate to casualty’s condition; organisation’s first aider and emergency service; methods of providing reassurance and comfort; ways in which to give qualified assistance clear and accurate information; methods of accident reporting procedures Types of casualty: eg adults, children, people with particular needs Types of injury/illness: minor injuries (can be dealt with on-site); minor illness (can be dealt with on site); major injuries (requiring medical attention); major illness (requiring medical attention)

3

Understand risks and hazards associated with sports participation People: eg inappropriate warm up or cool down, physical fitness, physique, alcohol, technique, skill level, over training, behaviour of other participants, jewellery, food, chewing gum Equipment: eg inappropriate clothing, lack of protective clothing or equipment, playing surface, faulty or damaged equipment Environment: eg cold weather, rain (flooding, muddy pitch), hot weather Rules, regulation and legislation: eg organisational rules specific to location and facility, Health and Safety at Work Act 1994, Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) 1994, Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981, Safety at Sports Ground Act 1975, Children Act 1989; particularly those relevant to the endorsed title studied by learners

4

Be able to undertake a risk assessment relevant to sport Purpose: ascertain level of risk; minimise injury; maintain safe environment; protect participants and those leading the activity Risk assessment: record sheets; identify types of hazards; identify possible risks involved and level of risk; use of specialist equipment to minimise identified risks; reporting procedures; contingency plans (why they are used, how to write them, for a range of changes of circumstance eg if weather conditions change, damaged equipment, differing skill levels of participants)

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BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

UNIT 2: HEALTH, SAFETY AND INJURY IN SPORT

Grading grid

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all of the learning outcomes for the unit. The criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit.

Grading criteria To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to: M1 explain risks and hazards associated with sports participation M2 explain prominent, rules, regulations and legislation relating to health safety and injury in sports participation M3 explain why certain injuries and illnesses are associated with sports participation M4 deal with casualties suffering from three different injuries and/or illnesses M5 describe contingency plans that can be used in a risk assessment. To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to: D1 give a detailed account of why participants are at risk of injury whilst taking part in sport D2 analyse the use of specialist equipment to minimise the risk of injury.

To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

P1 describe six risks and hazards associated with sports participation

P2 describe prominent rules, regulations and legislation relating to health safety and injury in sports participation

P3 describe four different types of injuries associated with sports participation and their underlying causes

P4 describe types and signs of illnesses related to sports participation

P5 deal with casualties suffering from three different injuries and/or illnesses, with teacher support

P6 complete a risk assessment relevant to sport.

Guidance to support the assessment of this unit is available on page 20.

BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

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UNIT 2: HEALTH, SAFETY AND INJURY IN SPORT

Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery This unit requires the learner to understand a great deal of theory and then apply their knowledge to practical situations. Therefore, the delivery of the unit must employ a range of techniques in order to ensure that the learner is equipped to deal with a range of situations relating to health and safety. In for learners to gain an understanding of risks and hazards tutors will need to impart a great deal of information. Wherever possible practical work should be used to complement this theoretical information. The unit content includes examples of what may be examined, and the tutor must determine what is appropriate to their learners and add or take away accordingly. However, the tutor should ensure that they attempt to cover all situations that learners may be faced with if they were working in the specified environment. The rules, regulations and legislation studied should only be those seen as relevant to learners’ sport pathways. Knowledge relating to different types of injuries and illnesses could be gained via a combination of theoretical teaching and practical work. The tutor can give examples of what may cause injury and then relate them to the key words, eg in kayaking, a participant may capsize and hit their head on a boulder in the river, this would be caused by an extrinsic factor. In each situation, the tutor should ensure that the examples given are relevant to the sport pathway upon which they are teaching. Types of injury can be taught using a range of methods and there are a number of websites with good examples. X-rays may also be used by tutors in order to show learners different types of bone injury. Types and signs of illness may be taught through role play, once all learners are familiar with the various types of ill health they may encounter. Again, where ever possible, the role play should be set in the relevant pathway. Knowledge and understanding relating to dealing with injuries and illness can be gained primarily through practical means. Learners could be taken to a leisure centre or outdoor pursuits facility and asked to find out what the organisation’s policy is on treating casualties. They could be asked to research how to find out who the designated first aider is, the different methods used to call for assistance within the centre, ways in which to give clear and accurate information to the first aider and how they would report an accident. Demonstrations of how to comfort and protect a range of casualties should be given and then the technique practiced by learners. The production of a risk assessment could be done as a group exercise in which all learners contribute to a risk assessment for a relevant activity. It should then be discussed and amended accordingly. For example, learners could carry out a risk assessment for a multistage fitness test. They would be given the relevant documentation then, with tutor guidance, examine the environment, the participants and the equipment. Assessment By asking the learner to examine one or more types of sports participation relevant to their sport pathway, tutors can assess knowledge of injuries and illnesses. Learners must then write a report that explains the risks and hazards associated with that sport and the types of injuries that people may sustain whilst participating. They could then identify the rules, regulation and legislations that are in place for these sports and their purpose.

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BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

UNIT 2: HEALTH, SAFETY AND INJURY IN SPORT

The learner’s ability to deal with injuries and illness could be assessed by asking the learner to choose a range of sports and then discus the risks associated with each sport. They may wish to include information from websites, with injury statistics for the different sports Learners should take part in simulated exercises in which they deal with a range of casualties, suffering with a minor illness, a minor injury, a major illness and a major injury. The casualty should be based in an environment relevant to the sport pathway and given a script, or some details, that they are allowed to tell the learner. From this the learner must deal with the casualty appropriately and their competence assessed through a witness statement and viva. Learners are required to produce a risk assessment. This could be used to determine the risk for a range of activities in which the learner partakes, eg for outdoor education, this could be included in conjunction with Unit 17: Expedition Skills, where learners could write a risk assessment for their expedition. They could then present this to the tutor and explain what they have done and why they have done it. Links to National Occupational Standards, other BTEC units, other BTEC qualifications and other relevant units and qualifications This unit has links with Unit 1: The Body in Sport, Unit 5: Planning and Leading Sports Activities, Unit 6: Practical Sport, Unit 7: Practical Outdoor and Adventurous Activities, Unit 13: Work-based Project in Sport, Unit 14: Instructing Exercise and Fitness and Unit 15: Sport and Leisure Facility Operations. This unit provides a progression route to the Edexcel Level 3 BTEC Nationals in Sport and Sport and Exercise Sciences. This unit has links to a range of National Occupational Standards, including Instructing Exercise and Fitness, at Level 2, particularly Unit D35: Deal with accidents and emergencies. This unit also covers much of the underpinning knowledge related to entry to the Register of Exercise Professionals. This unit provides learners with the opportunity to provide evidence for key skills in communication and problem solving. Essential resources Learners will need to have access to information regarding current, and relevant, rules, regulations and legislation, as well as appropriate resources required to ‘deal with’ casualties suffering from injury and illness. Indicative reading for learners Materials that illustrate the level of learning required and that are particularly relevant. Tutors should be aware that textbooks are frequently updated and that they should use the latest editions where available. Examples currently include: Dalgleish J et al — The Health & Fitness Handbook (Longman, 2001) Harris B et al — BTEC First Sport: Student Book (Heinemann, 2004) Honeybourne J — BTEC First in Sport (Nelson Thornes, 2005)

BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

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UNIT 2: HEALTH, SAFETY AND INJURY IN SPORT

Key skills

Achievement of key skills is not a requirement of this qualification but it is encouraged. Suggestions of opportunities for the generation of level 2 key skill evidence are given here. Staff should check that learners have produced all the evidence required by part B of the key skills specifications when assessing this evidence. Learners may need to develop additional evidence elsewhere to fully meet the requirements of the key skills specifications.

Communication level 2 When learners are: • • • discussing topics such as risks, hazards and injuries describing topics such as risks, hazards and injuries reviewing information regarding rules, regulations and legislation They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: C2.1a C2.1b C2.2 Take part in a group discussion. Give a talk of at least four minutes. Read and summarise information from at least two documents about the same subject. Each document must be a minimum of 500 words long. • describing topics such as risks, hazards and injuries. C2.3 Write two different types of documents each one giving different information. One document must be at least 500 words long.

Problem solving level 2 When learners are: • dealing with casualties suffering from a range of injuries and illnesses. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: PS2.1 Identify a problem, with help from an appropriate person, and identify different ways of tackling it. Plan and try out at least one way of solving the problem. Check if the problem has been solved and identify ways to improve problem solving skills.

PS2.2 PS2.3

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BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

UNIT 3: THE SPORTS INDUSTRY

Unit 3:
NQF Level 2:

The Sports Industry
BTEC First

Guided learning hours: 60

Unit abstract
As society has evolved and changed, so has the amount of leisure time available. Increased leisure time, along with increased interest in sport, has meant that the sports industry has developed into a multifaceted, complex entity that has huge economic significance, on a national and global scale. This unit gives learners the opportunity to investigate the many elements that make up the multimillion pound sports industry. Learners will look at what sport is, where it takes place, how it is organised and funded and reasons for participation. The sports industry is influenced by, and influences, many different things, all of which have been, and continue to be, important in the development of the industry. In this unit, learners will investigate the impacts and effects of a range of key issues on the sports industry, and viceversa. The learner will also develop an appreciation of how sport is organised on both local and national levels, and the factors that influence participation in sport, and therefore, the sports industry. The information the learner will gain from this unit underpins the study of the sport sector and how this can now provide many employment opportunities thus linking and supporting all other units within this qualification.

Learning outcomes
On completion of this unit a learner should: 1 2 3 4 Understand the nature of the sports industry Understand how and why people participate in sport Know how the sports industry is funded Understand the impact of different key issues upon the sports industry.

BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

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UNIT 3: THE SPORTS INDUSTRY

Unit content

1

Understand the nature of the sports industry Activities: eg team and individual games, gymnastic, dance, athletics, outdoor and adventurous activities Provision: public sector eg local authority facilities; private sector eg private health clubs; voluntary sector eg voluntary sports clubs Organisation: structure and function; governing bodies (national and international) eg International Olympic Committee, the Lawn Tennis Association, the Rugby Football Union Development: trends eg participation, consumption Growth: eg increased leisure time, fashion, increased disposable income

2

Understand how and why people participate in sport Ways: eg performer (amateur, professional), official, coach, leader, administrator, spectator, consumer, retailer, medical staff, sports development Reasons: health and fitness benefits; social benefits; development (personal, skill) Factors that affect participation: disability; provision; cost; ethnicity; location; age Strategies to encourage participation: strategies eg mass participation (school sports strategies, government initiatives), sports specific schemes, sports development officers; strengths and weaknesses of strategies

3

Know how the sport industry is funded Funding: eg government funding, National Lottery, sponsorship (acceptable and unacceptable), advertising, broadcast rights, sales (merchandise, tickets, membership, entry)

4

Understand the impact of different key issues upon the sports industry Issues: eg race, drugs (doping, abuse, addiction), social influences, economic influences, media (television, radio, internet, mobile phone, newspapers, magazines) Impacts: positive and negative; eg on participants (performers, providers, supporters, consumers), viewing and media scheduling, income, participation, role models, privacy, pressure

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BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

UNIT 3: THE SPORTS INDUSTRY

Grading grid

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all of the learning outcomes for the unit. The criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit.

Grading criteria To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to: M1 M2 D2 M3 M4 explain strategies used by a chosen sport to encourage participation explain the impact of four key issues on sport. D3 explain how a chosen sport is organised and funded, identifying areas for improvement compare local and national provision of sport, identifying areas for improvement D1 To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to: evaluate local and national provision of sport, suggesting ways in which local provision could be improved

To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

P1

describe the local provision of sport

P2

describe the national provision of sport

P3

describe how a chosen sport is organised and funded

P4

describe ways in which people participate in sport and reasons for participation

evaluate the organisation and funding of a chosen sport, suggesting ways in which it could be improved evaluate strategies used by a chosen sport to encourage participation.

P5

describe factors that affect participation in sport

P6

describe ways in which participation in sport is encouraged

P7

describe four key issues in sport and identify their impact on sport.

Guidance to support the assessment of this unit is available on page 26.

BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

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UNIT 3: THE SPORTS INDUSTRY

Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery This unit should be viewed as the opportunity for learners to develop an understanding of the sports industry as a whole, and to assess the impact of key areas on the industry. The aim of the unit should be to provide learners with the key knowledge that underpins all careers the sports industry. Input from tutors is necessary in order to cover the broad range of issues within this unit. However, it would be appropriate to develop links with local authority sports development officers, and sports specific development officers, to provide current information about strategies that are being implemented on either a local, national or sports specific basis. Other key providers from within the sports industry could be approached to help provide up-to-date details about key practices that occur within various sectors of the sports industry. Learners can then compare and contrast the roles, responsibilities and experiences of various employees within the sports industry. Strategies that encourage participation, and the social and cultural factors that affect participation, are important elements to this unit. The effects of these strategies and factors on participation are best covered by learners completing an analysis of the target groups, impacts and effectiveness of various key strategies that are being currently deployed by agencies both locally and nationally. Learners should be able to compare local and national provision for sport and analyse strengths in the provision along with areas for improvement. The organisation of sport within the UK is best highlighted by learners completing studies of several of the major national sports governing bodies that operate within the UK. Tutors should highlight the structure and functions of national sports governing bodies, along with their position within the governing body structure. Upon completion of this unit, learners should be able to explain how a particular sport is organised. National governing body websites are useful sources of information to help underpin individual learner’s work. The influence of key issues on the sports industry, and the influence the sports industry exerts on these issues, is a theme that permeates this unit. The range of issues that can be looked at is wide and affords learners the opportunity to consider things that are of particular interest to them, or that are current, and for which information is easily accessible. To successfully complete this unit, learners will need to develop independent study skills to allow them to research information relevant to this unit. Learners should be able to access information from a variety of sources and be able to use the gained information appropriately with succinct summarising and accurate referencing. Some issues are complex and will require structured teaching to allow learners to develop an understanding of these issues. Assessment The learning outcomes of this unit require a variety of assessment methods. When examining the nature of the sports industry learners could complete written reports highlighting the differences between the attitudes, and experiences, of participants in various forms of physical activity; the types of sporting activity available, provision for sport locally and nationally; the organisation of sport and the factors that have caused the sports industry to grow.

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BF017349 Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

UNIT 3: THE SPORTS INDUSTRY

When examining how and why people participate in sport learners could be encouraged to complete a PowerPoint presentation. This presentation could focus on one particular sport to help learners to produce an in-depth analysis on a range of sports if learners wish to compare and contrast the effectiveness of various strategies. This could also provide evidence for the assessment of key skills. To examine how the sports industry is funded learners could be asked to produce a financial plan for the running of a local sports club or sports event. Learners should take into account all potential sources of income and the ethical issues that arise from the various sources of income. Teacher support can be provided along with information from other sources such as local sports club committee members or sports specific event organisers. Evidence relating to the impact of key issues on the sports industry could take many forms, including a written report, a presentation or a mixed media product, such as a display or portfolio. Links to National Occupational Standards, other BTEC units, other BTEC qualifications and other relevant units and qualifications This unit has links with Unit 13: Work-based Project in Sport and Unit 15: Sports and Leisure Facility Operations. This unit provides a progression route from the Edexcel Level 1 BTEC Introductory Certificate and Diploma in Sport and Leisure and to the Edexcel Level 3 BTEC Nationals in Sport. This unit provides learners with the opportunity to provide evidence for the key skill in communication. Essential resources Learners should have access to the internet to allow research into the activities of national governing bodies in sport. Learners should also be able to access libraries that contain textbooks and newspaper articles relating to current issues within sport, along with up to date governing body publications. To develop learners understanding of global issues in sport it would be useful for them to be able to access video of sports performance in different cultures, along with examples of different types of media covering the same sport. Access to people currently operating within the sports industry eg sports development officers, retailers, leisure centre operatives, will allow learners to gain first-hand experience of the sports industry operating on a daily basis. Indicative reading for learners Materials that illustrate the level of learning required and that are particularly relevant. Tutors should be aware that textbooks are frequently updated and that they should use the latest editions where available. Examples currently include: Harris B et al — BTEC First Sport: Student Book (Heinemann, 2004) Honeybourne J — BTEC First in Sport (Nelson Thornes, 2005)

BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

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UNIT 3: THE SPORTS INDUSTRY

Key skills

Achievement of key skills is not a requirement of this qualification but it is encouraged. Suggestions of opportunities for the generation of level 2 key skill evidence are given here. Staff should check that learners have produced all the evidence required by part B of the key skills specifications when assessing this evidence. Learners may need to develop additional evidence elsewhere to fully meet the requirements of the key skills specifications.

Communication level 2 When learners are: • • discussing how people participate in sport explaining how a chosen sport is organised and funded, or how people participate in sport researching and comparing local and national provision of sport They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: C2.1a C2.1b Take part in a group discussion Give a talk of at least four minutes



C2.2

Read and summarise information from at least two documents about the same subject. Each document must be a minimum of 500 words long.



describing factors that affect participation in sport, or the influences of key issues.

C2.3

Write two different types of documents each one giving different information. One document must be at least 500 words long.

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BF017349 Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

UNIT 4: PREPARATION FOR SPORT

Unit 4:
NQF Level 2:

Preparation for Sport
BTEC First

Guided learning hours: 60

Unit abstract
It is often said that ‘failing to prepare equals preparing to fail’. It is, therefore, essential that those involved in, and studying, sport have a good understanding of concepts relating to preparation for sport. This unit gives learners the opportunity to examine the basic factors of fitness, lifestyle, nutrition and psychology in sport. Through completing this unit learners will be expected to plan basic fitness and nutritional strategies. The unit should provide learners with the opportunity to develop such strategies for a range of athletes from a variety of sports. The unit will also introduce learners to the basic psychological factors that could affect sports performers. Again, this is intended to be an introduction only. The unit will give learners an insight into the essential preparation required for successful sports performance. Learners are expected to investigate the fitness level and lifestyle of an individual and administer a range of simple field tests of physical fitness. This will enable learners to discuss the effects of lifestyle on sports performance. Learners are encouraged to look at different methods of fitness training for each of the components of physical fitness and plan a fitness training programme for a selected individual. The nutritional requirements of sports performers are also explored, as learners are expected to have a basic understanding of healthy eating and the specific nutritional requirements of a range of sports people. The unit also covers the effects of psychological factors on sports performance and training including motivation, arousal and anxiety, personality and concentration.

Learning outcomes
On completion of this unit a learner should: 1 2 3 4 Understand the fitness and lifestyle of an individual sports performer Be able to plan a simple fitness training programme for an individual sports performer Understand the nutritional requirements of effective sports performance Understand the psychological factors that affect sports training and performance.

BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

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UNIT 4: PREPARATION FOR SPORT

Unit content

1 Understand the fitness and lifestyle of an individual sports performer Components of physical fitness: strength; endurance; speed; flexibility; body composition Components of skill-related fitness: agility; balance; co-ordination; power; reaction time Fitness tests: field tests of physical fitness eg flexibility (sit and reach test, goniometers), aerobic endurance (multistage fitness test, Chester step test), strength (grip dynamometer, one-repetition maximum), speed (40m sprint), body composition (body mass index, skinfold analyses), power (vertical jump, wingate test), and muscular endurance (one minute pressup and sit-up tests) Protocol: valid; accepted and standard (method, results, conclusion and evaluation of results); informed consent; use of equipment (calibration) Lifestyle: eg stress, alcohol, smoking, drugs, sleep, demands of work, medical history, level of activity, diet, weight, gender, culture, sports participation (training and competition) 2 Be able to plan a simple fitness training programme for an individual sports performer Fitness training methods: eg flexibility training (static, active, passive, ballistic), strength and power training (resistance machines, circuit training, plyometrics, reps, sets and resistance) endurance training (continuous training, fartlek training, interval training, heart rate, training zones) speed and speed endurance (hollow sprints, acceleration sprints, interval training) Training programmes: principles of training (frequency, intensity, time, type, overload, specificity, progression) Evaluate: pre and post-testing; strengths and weaknesses; identify areas for improvement; modifications and changes 3 Understand the nutritional requirements of effective sports performance Nutrients: carbohydrates; fat; protein; water; vitamins (A, B, C, D, E and K); minerals (calcium, iron); functions; dietary sources Healthy diet: eg recommended nutrient intake food groups, types of food eaten, eating patterns pre and post-competitions, events or training Nutrition strategies: eg recommended dietary guidelines, timing of food intake, pre- and post-event and training meals, hydration, sports drinks (hypertonic, hypotonic, isotonic) Nutritional supplements: eg energy bars, vitamin and mineral supplements, creatine, protein supplements 4 Understand the psychological factors that affect sports training and performance Factors: motivation; arousal and anxiety; personality; concentration Effects: short-term eg increased motivation, activate athletes towards targets and goals; long-term eg maintenance of targets and goals, improved sports performance

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BF017349 Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

UNIT 4: PREPARATION FOR SPORT

Grading grid

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all of the learning outcomes for the unit. The criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit.

Grading criteria To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to: M1 D1 M2 D2 explain the effects of fitness and the lifestyle of sports performers on sports performance To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to: evaluate the effects of lifestyle factors on sports performance, providing recommendations for changes analyse the fitness test results drawing valid conclusions and making recommendations for future sports performance D3 analyse psychological factors that affect sports training and performance.

To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

P1

describe the components of fitness and their effect on sports performance

P2 independently select and conduct three suitable tests, related to different areas of fitness, in order to assess the fitness of a selected sports performer, accurately recording and interpreting results independently plan a six-week training programme for a selected sports performer explain dietary guidelines and meal plans describe psychological factors that can affect sports training and performance and what the effects on sports training and performance could be.

describe four different lifestyle factors that can affect sports performance

P3 M3 M4 M5

select and conduct three suitable tests, related to different areas of fitness, in order to assess the fitness of a selected sports performer, with teacher support, recording results accurately

P4

plan, with teacher support, a six-week training programme for a selected sports performer

P5

prepare and present dietary guidelines for a selected sports performer, providing suitable daily meal plans over a two week period

P6

identify psychological factors that can affect sports training and performance and what the effects on sports training and performance could be.

Guidance to support the assessment of this unit is available on page 32. 31

BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

UNIT 4: PREPARATION FOR SPORT

Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery This unit should be viewed as an introduction to fitness, nutrition and sports psychology, giving a general overview rather than great depth. The aim should be to interest learners and create awareness of these different areas. Input from tutors is necessary, in order to cover the theoretical aspects of the unit. However, the unit should be delivered in a practical situation wherever possible. Learners should be shown how to carry out a range of physical fitness tests and there should be opportunities for learners to practise carrying out these tests on each other. Learners also need to experience a range of fitness training methods. The importance of medical screening and informed consent prior to commencing a new exercise programme and fitness testing must be emphasised. Learners must be shown examples of suitable consent forms. The effect of lifestyle on performance lends itself to group discussion and personal reflection. There are a number of lifestyle analysis questionnaires available and learners should find it interesting to complete some of these. Teachers should cover the characteristics of a healthy diet and the dietary requirements of a range of sports people from strength/power sports, endurance sports and games. Case studies could be used in order to give learners the opportunity to apply their knowledge and discuss a range of issues that are related to areas such as weight management. Learners can also examine their own diet. Teachers should use examples of elite sports people when explaining the effect of sports psychology on sports training and performance, including those that are relevant to outdoor education. It would be beneficial to have input from a sports nutritionist and a sports psychologist. Assessment When considering assessment strategies tutors should consider the diversity of this specific unit. The learning outcomes cover a wide area of learning. Therefore tutors should consider providing four assessments, one to meet each of the learning outcomes and the specific grading criteria. When covering the components of fitness and lifestyle factors tutors could request that learners complete a presentation on a specific sport, examining various factors that could hinder performance and suggest ways of enhancing performance through lifestyle. The presentation should also include components of fitness and their possible effects on performance in the selected sport. When completing the fitness testing element of this unit the tutor should observe learners undertaking fitness tests on a specific client covering a variety of components of fitness. This should be tracked by the tutor on a witness statement or observation record sheet. It is important that after completion of the practical the learner produces a written record of the results obtained. When commenting on the results learners should make comment on the national benchmarks that most tests have, this will enable them to grade themselves, and thus comment on their performance, and make recommendations as to how they could improve areas of fitness for future development. 32
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UNIT 4: PREPARATION FOR SPORT

The planning of the training programme could be a sub task of the fitness testing assessment and the learner could produce a training programme for the client they worked with on the fitness tests. The learner may select specific areas of weaknesses that they identified from the fitness tests. The training programme should be based around one or two areas of fitness and the leaner should produce specific activities that the client could follow in order to improve these areas of fitness. To continue this theme, dietary guidelines could be provided for the client, with an explanation of why the dietary plan is suitable. As well as listing food sources learners should list the nutritional components of the food types. Learners should also be guided towards discussing the importance of specific food types for specific athletes and possibly even sport specific food sources. Finally, the understanding of psychological factors could be assessed through the completion of a written report that examines the effects these factors can have on sports performance. Links to National Occupational Standards, other BTEC units, other BTEC qualifications and other relevant units and qualifications This unit has links with Unit 1: The Body in Sport, Unit 2: Health, Safety and Injury in Sport, Unit 4: Preparation for Sport, Unit 9: Psychology for Sports Performance, Unit 10: Nutrition for Sports Performance and Unit 11: Fitness for Sports Performance. This unit provides a progression route to the Edexcel Level 3 BTEC Nationals in Sport and Sport and Exercise Sciences. This unit has links to the National Occupational Standards in Coaching, Teaching and Instructing, Activity Leadership and Instructing Exercise and Fitness at Level 2. This unit provides learners with the opportunity to provide evidence for keys skills in communication and problem solving. Essential resources Learners will need access to the appropriate fitness testing equipment and an appropriate area to undertake the practical and physical elements of the unit, such as a sports hall or gym. Learners will also need access to examples of consent forms. Indicative reading for learners Materials that illustrate the level of learning required and that are particularly relevant. Tutors should be aware that textbooks are frequently updated and that they should use the latest editions where available. Examples currently include: Dalgleish J et al — The Health & Fitness Handbook (Longman, 2001) Harris B et al — BTEC First Sport: Student Book (Heinemann, 2004) Honeybourne J — BTEC First in Sport (Nelson Thornes, 2005) Scott A — GCSE PE for Edexcel (Heinemann, 2001) Sharkey B — Fitness and Health (Human Kinetics, 2001)

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UNIT 4: PREPARATION FOR SPORT

Key skills

Achievement of key skills is not a requirement of this qualification but it is encouraged. Suggestions of opportunities for the generation of level 2 key skill evidence are given here. Staff should check that learners have produced all the evidence required by part B of the key skills specifications when assessing this evidence. Learners may need to develop additional evidence elsewhere to fully meet the requirements of the key skills specifications.

Communication level 2 When learners are: • describing components of fitness and their effects on sports performance discussing lifestyle factors that can affect sports performance researching psychological factors that can affect sports training and performance preparing and presenting dietary guidelines. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: C2.1a Take part in a group discussion

• •

C2.1b C2.2

Give a talk of at least four minutes Read and summarise information from at least two documents about the same subject. Each document must be a minimum of 500 words long.



C2.3

Write two different types of documents each one giving different information. One document must be at least 500 words long.

Problem solving level 2 When learners are: • planning a training programme for a selected sports performer. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: PS2.1 Identify a problem, with help from an appropriate person, and identify different ways of tackling it. Plan and try out at least one way of solving the problem. Check if the problem has been solved and identify ways to improve problem solving skills.

PS2.2 PS2.3

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BF017349 Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

UNIT 5: PLANNING AND LEADING SPORTS ACTIVITIES

Unit 5:
NQF Level 2:

Planning and Leading Sports Activities
BTEC First

Guided learning hours: 60

Unit abstract
Participation in planning and leading sports activities is increasing. No longer is supervision and coaching in sport the sole domain of physical education teachers and sports coaches. The introduction of community leadership courses and sports college initiatives has resulted in a greater demand for, and supply of, effective leaders in sport. Out of School Hours Learning opportunities in primary schools, the development of academies at sports clubs and activities in the community have created many opportunities for sports leaders to demonstrate, develop and refine their skills in this area. This unit provides learners with the knowledge and skills to be able to plan and lead a range of practical sports activities. The unit content can be adapted to suit a range of activities for different individuals and groups, including children and those with specific needs. The unit provides the learners with what could be their first step into leadership and sports coaching. The unit looks at the qualities necessary for effective sports leadership. Learners will identify the qualities required by studying real examples of successful leaders, possibly those they have worked with or observed in the community. The unit addresses the planning process involved in sports leadership and the learners are given the opportunity to put this into practice in the organisation and delivery of two very different activity sessions. Learners may also be able to identify and develop leadership qualities and skills through their own relationships with their peers. Understanding, and demonstrating, the responsibilities of a sports leader is a very important part of this unit. Learners will be taught all of the health and safety considerations, the legalities of working in practical situations, particularly with young children, and their own responsibilities as regards personal behaviour and appearance.

Learning outcomes
On completion of this unit a learner should: 1 2 3 4 5 Understand the skills, qualities and responsibilities associated with successful sports leadership Be able to plan and lead an activity session Be able to review their planning and leadership of sports activities Be able to assist in the planning and leading of a sports event Be able to review their planning and leadership of sports events.

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UNIT 5: PLANNING AND LEADING SPORTS ACTIVITIES

Unit content

1 Understand the skills, qualities and responsibilities associated with successful sports leadership Skills: eg communication, organisation of equipment, knowledge, activity structure, target setting, use of language, evaluation Qualities: eg appearance, leadership style, personality, enthusiasm, motivation, humour, confidence Responsibilities: eg professional conduct, health and safety, insurance, child protection, legal obligations, equality, rules and regulations, ethics and values 2 Be able to plan and lead an activity session Plan: participants eg age, ability, gender, numbers, medical, specific needs; resources eg equipment, time, environment; target setting; expected outcomes Lead: eg demonstration of appropriate skills, qualities and responsibilities appropriate to activity and stage of development Activity: structure and components of activity eg warm up, skill introduction, development, conditioned game, competition, cool down Recording: eg diary, logbook, portfolio, video, audio, observation record, witness testimony, feedback sheets 3 Be able to review their planning and leadership of sports activities Review: feedback (from participants, supervisor and observers); strengths and areas for improvement eg planning, content, organisation, health and safety, style and personal qualities, achievements Set targets for improvement and development: specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, time-bound (SMART); development plans; development opportunities eg specific training and courses 4 Be able to assist in the planning and leading of a sports event Plan: eg booking of facilities, rules, health and safety, first aid, risk assessment, letters (administration, invitation), structure of the competition, scoring systems, refreshments, organisation of equipment, presentations and rewards; contingency planning; roles and responsibilities Lead: demonstration of a range of skills, qualities and responsibilities appropriate to role eg introductions and explanations, warm up, cool down, officiating, scoring, timekeeping, first aid, presentation ceremony, refreshments, equipment Event: eg sports day, festival of sport, sports tournament (5-a-side football, tennis) Recording: eg diary, logbook, portfolio, video, audio, observation record, witness testimony, feedback sheets

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UNIT 5: PLANNING AND LEADING SPORTS ACTIVITIES

5

Be able to review their planning and leadership of sports events Review: feedback (from participants, supervisor and observers)strengths and areas for improvement eg planning, content, organisation, health and safety, style and personal qualities, achievements Set targets for improvement and development: specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, time-bound (SMART); development plans; development opportunities eg specific training and courses

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UNIT 5: PLANNING AND LEADING SPORTS ACTIVITIES

Grading grid

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all of the learning outcomes for the unit. The criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit.

Grading criteria To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to: M1 explain the skills, qualities and responsibilities associated with successful sports leadership, giving comparisons and contrasts between successful sports leaders independently plan and lead a sports activity To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to: D1 evaluate the skills and qualities of two contrasting leaders in sport, commenting on their effectiveness

To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

P1

describe the skills, qualities and responsibilities associated with successful sports leadership, using two examples of successful sports leaders M2 M3

P2

plan and lead a sports activity with teacher support

P3

review their planning and leading of a sports activity, identifying strengths and areas for improvement

D2 evaluate own performance in the planning and leading of sports activities and events, commenting on strengths and areas for improvement and further development as a sports leader.

P4 M4

assist in the planning and leading of a sports event describing own role within the event, and producing evidence that this has been effective

explain strengths and areas for improvement in their planning and leading of a sports activity, making suggestions relating to improvement explain strengths and areas for improvement in assisting in the planning and leading of a sports event, making suggestions relating to improvement.

P5

review their performance in assisting in the planning and leading of a sports event, commenting on own effectiveness and identifying strengths and areas for improvement.

Guidance to support the assessment of this unit is available on page 40.

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UNIT 5: PLANNING AND LEADING SPORTS ACTIVITIES

Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery It is important that learners develop an understanding of the role and responsibilities of a sports leader. Practical situations, either through roleplay or observations, should be used to support any knowledge gained in the classroom. Leadership skills should be developed through experience, guided and supported by the tutor. There are probably many experienced practitioners working within each centre. To be able to understand the skills, qualities and responsibilities associated with successful sports leadership each learner should be able to observe and work alongside a sports leader. At an early stage in the course each individual learner should be given the opportunity to lead their peer group in some form of practical activity. This is an ideal way for each learner to experience the role and encounter the difficulties that may arise. In planning and leading activity sessions learners could take a warm up, part of the skill development activity or organise the game situation. A hands-on approach should be more enjoyable and beneficial to the learner, and more interesting and relevant for the tutor to deliver. This should allow learners to develop confidence, organisational and personal skills that could be used later on in the unit. Tutors should check activity plans before the session is delivered, so as to judge the appropriateness and give guidance accordingly. Any experience of a Level 1 leadership course will benefit the learners immensely. It is essential that learners experience and understand the value of working effectively as a member of a team. This will be important when delivering the event at a later stage. Again, it may be beneficial for learners to observe a festival/sports event at some stage in the course to appreciate the benefits of thorough planning. This could perhaps be one that the tutor has delivered themselves. The stages of the planning cycle could then be explained and related to a real example. The organisation and leading of the sports event is a major focus of the unit. The tutor needs to ensure that planning is being carried out thoroughly and all health and safety aspects are being dealt with. Regular planning meetings are advisable, organised by learners but overseen by the tutor. The tutor will be taking ultimate responsibility on the day of the event, even if learners are doing all of the work. The activity and the age group identified will depend on local circumstances and access to groups within the community. The review of both the activity session and the sports event are essential in the delivery of the learning outcomes. Participants and an observer should complete feedback sheets. Learners should also be encouraged to look at a video of the session or activity, which will provide them with more evidence for their review. It is essential that tutors use their professional judgement when arranging leadership experience and tasks where learners are leading groups within the community. The activity plan should be checked by the tutor beforehand to confirm that it is appropriate for the group. Learners can observe and assist leaders, teachers and coaches at work and experience the variety of skills, qualities, roles and responsibilities involved. The use of positive role models within the centre or community could be a major factor in the success of the unit. Health and safety issues can be dealt with at the centre, developing scenarios for learners to make judgements on. Video analysis is an accurate way of reinforcing both good habits and areas for development. If learners participate in leadership or Governing Body Awards then evidence from this may be used towards achievement some of the grading criteria.

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UNIT 5: PLANNING AND LEADING SPORTS ACTIVITIES

Assessment The assessment of this unit should be carried out using a variety of methods. The task looking at successful sports leaders could result in a poster that is divided into the sections of skills, qualities and responsibilities. This could then act as a visual stimulant throughout learners’ leadership experience. An extended piece of written work, alongside the poster, may be required to fulfil the higher grading criteria. Tutors should encourage each learner to choose leaders of either different levels (professional and voluntary) or different approaches and responsibilities (teacher and club coach). In this way, learners will gain a greater understanding of the range of people involved in sports leadership, and the variety of skills and qualities each possesses. The planning and leading of a sports activity needs to be closely monitored by the tutor. Learners could plan a warm up, a skills practice or a conditioned game to meet the grading criteria. Written evidence of the plan needs to be produced, along with an observation record completed by the tutor. Learners need not be assessed in their first leadership experience. It would be more beneficial if this was completed when more of the skills for effective leadership had been developed. It also gives each learner more opportunity to achieve the merit criteria, which rewards independence in the planning process. After the completion of the activity session learners are required to submit a written report reviewing their performance. This should identify both strengths and areas for development. Evidence should be gained through feedback from participants and an observer. Any forms used for this purpose should be submitted by the learner as part of the review material. The sports event will provide a major contribution to the assessment of this unit. Learners should submit the overall plan for the event, and highlight the part that they have been responsible for. Detailed evidence should be supplied, eg scoresheets, rules, copies of letters, risk assessment. Learners need to work closely with there peers and should receive an observation record from the tutor as evidence that they have made a contribution to both the planning and leading of the event. Minutes of meetings can be recorded and used as evidence. The review of their own performance should be conducted in a similar way to the activity session. The final evaluation of the learner’s performance as at leader is at distinction level and cannot be completed until after the sports event. The evaluation specifically comments on how they have developed as a leader throughout the unit, their strengths and weaknesses and how they could improve in the future. Targets could be set and an action plan identified. Links to National Occupational Standards, other BTEC units, other BTEC qualifications and other relevant units and qualifications This unit has links with Unit 2: Health, Safety and Injury in Sport, Unit 6: Practical Sport, Unit 13: Work-based Project in Sport, Unit 14: Instructing Exercise and Fitness, Unit 15: Sport and Leisure Facility Operations and Unit 16: Leading Outdoor and Adventurous Activities. This unit provides a progression route from the Edexcel Level 1 BTEC Introductory Certificate and Diploma in Sport and Leisure, and progression to the Edexcel Level 3 BTEC Nationals in Sport and Sport and Exercise Sciences. This unit also has links to awards and qualifications from national governing bodies, and the National Coaching Foundation, as well as the Junior and Community Sports Leaders Awards from the British Sports Trust. This unit has links to the National Occupational Standards, at Level 2, in Activity Leadership and Coaching, Teaching and Instructing.

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UNIT 5: PLANNING AND LEADING SPORTS ACTIVITIES

This unit provides learners with the opportunity to provide evidence for key skills in communication, improving own learning and performance, problem solving and working with others. Essential resources Learners will require access to a range of sports and recreational facilities and equipment, required for the activities and events that they will be leading, as well as access to suitable groups that could be used as participants. Indicative reading for learners Materials that illustrate the level of learning required and that are particularly relevant. Tutors should be aware that textbooks are frequently updated and that they should use the latest editions where available. Examples currently include: Harris B et al — BTEC First Sport: Student Book (Heinemann, 2004) Honeybourne J — BTEC First in Sport (Nelson Thornes, 2005) Journals which may support the delivery of this unit include: Teaching Physical Education

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UNIT 5: PLANNING AND LEADING SPORTS ACTIVITIES

Key skills

Achievement of key skills is not a requirement of this qualification but it is encouraged. Suggestions of opportunities for the generation of level 2 key skill evidence are given here. Staff should check that learners have produced all the evidence required by part B of the key skills specifications when assessing this evidence. Learners may need to develop additional evidence elsewhere to fully meet the requirements of the key skills specifications.

Communication level 2 When learners are: • examining the skills, qualities and responsibilities of successful sports leadership discussing successful sports leaders and the skills, qualities and responsibilities of successful sports leadership planning an activity session and a sports event. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: C2.1a Take part in a group discussion



C2.1b

Give a talk of at least four minutes



C2.2

Read and summarise information from at least two documents about the same subject. Each document must be a minimum of 500 words long.

C2.3

Write two different types of documents each one giving different information. One document must be at least 500 words long.

Improving own learning and performance level 2 When learners are: • • planning and reviewing the activity session with the tutor identifying strengths and areas for improvement in the leading of activities and events. reviewing the contribution made towards the sports event. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: LP2.1 LP2.2 Help set targets with an appropriate person and plan how these will be met. Take responsibility for some decisions about your learning, using your plan to help meet targets and improve your performance. Review progress with an appropriate person and provide evidence of your achievements.



LP2.3

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BF017349 Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

UNIT 5: PLANNING AND LEADING SPORTS ACTIVITIES

Problem solving level 2 When learners are: • providing a contingency plans for the sports event planning for contingencies reviewing the sports event. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: PS2.1 Identify a problem, with help from an appropriate person, and identify different ways of tackling it. Plan and try out at least one way of solving the problem. Check if the problem has been solved and identify ways to improve problem solving skills.

• •

PS2.2 PS2.3

Working with others level 2 When learners are: • • • assisting in the planning of the sports event. assisting in the planning of the sports event assisting in the planning of the sports event. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: WO2.1 Plan work with others. WO2.2 Work co-operatively towards achieving the identified objectives. WO2.3 Review your contribution and agree ways to improve work with others.

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UNIT 5: PLANNING AND LEADING SPORTS ACTIVITIES

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BF017349 Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

UNIT 6: PRACTICAL SPORT

Unit 6:
NQF Level 2:

Practical Sport
BTEC First

Guided learning hours: 60

Unit abstract
Participation in sports activities continues to grow, as people become more aware of the benefits of an active lifestyle, and as opportunities to take part increase. Practical application and performance supports and reinforces the knowledge and understanding required to study aspects of leadership, fitness and training and health and safety. This unit provides a dynamic, relevant and challenging contribution to the study of sport at this level. This unit focuses on developing and improving the learner’s own practical sports performance. This is achieved through learners taking part in practical activities and reflecting on their own performance and that of other sports performers. At least one team and one individual sport should be studied, giving each learner the opportunity to improve and develop their understanding. Learners should be able to practice and refine their individual skills and techniques, experience tactics and team formations and be able to analyse the strengths and weaknesses of themselves and others. The rules and regulations of each sport should be investigated, and the knowledge gained applied through the observation of officials in action. Learners could also be encouraged to take part in governing body awards to reinforce and extend their knowledge and qualifications in this area. Throughout the unit learners will be made aware of safe practice relating to players, officials, equipment and the environment. Learners should be able to take part in sports offered by the centre, and that are available as part of their community involvement. These may be sports at which they either excel or have a particular interest.

Learning outcomes
On completion of this unit a learner should: 1 2 3 4 Be able to demonstrate a range of skills, techniques and tactics in selected sports Know the rules, regulations and scoring systems of selected sports Understand the roles and responsibilities of officials in selected sports Be able to analyse the sports performance of an individual or team.

BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

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UNIT 6: PRACTICAL SPORT

Unit content

1

Be able to demonstrate a range of skills, techniques and tactics in selected sports Skills and techniques: required to perform the sport effectively eg passing, receiving, shooting, dribbling, heading, tumbling, striking, throwing, starting, footwork, bowling, intercepting/tackling, dodging, creating space Tactics: eg defensive, offensive, set plays, formations, marking, communication Sports: team eg association football, basketball, cricket, hockey, lacrosse, netball, rugby (league or union), rounders, volleyball; individual eg golf, trampolining, table tennis, archery, squash, judo, cross-country Recording evidence: eg diary, logbook, portfolio, video, audio, observation record, witness testimony, feedback sheets

2

Know the rules, regulations and scoring systems of selected sports Rules: rules (or laws) applied by the National Governing Body for the sport Regulations: eg players and participants, equipment, playing surface, facilities, health and safety, time, officials (referee, umpire, judge, starter, timekeeper) Scoring systems: eg method of scoring goals or points, method and requirements of victory

3

Understand the roles and responsibilities of officials in selected sports Roles: eg umpire, referee, judge, scorer, timekeeper, assistants, starter, table officials, 3rd umpire, 4th official Responsibilities: eg appearance, equipment, fitness, qualifications, interpretation and application of rules, control of players, accountability to spectators, health and safety (equipment, facilities, players), fair play, use of technology, effective communication (voice, whistle, signals)

4

Be able to analyse the sports performance of an individual or team Performance: eg specific to sport, statistics and data, scoring and conceding, time, distance, height, passes, interceptions, discipline Analysis: observation checklist; strengths and weaknesses eg demonstration of skills, techniques and tactics, knowledge, application and respect for the rules and regulations, communication, teamwork, preparation, health and safety Improvements: eg individual skills, tactics and teamwork, fitness, training programme, use of technology, courses, where to seek help and advice

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UNIT 6: PRACTICAL SPORT

Grading grid

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all of the learning outcomes for the unit. The criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit.

Grading criteria To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to: M1 D1 M2 D2 describe use of tactics appropriate for one team and one individual sport explain, using appropriate examples, the rules, regulations and scoring systems for one team and one individual sport independently produce an observation checklist that could be used to review the performance of an individual or a team To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to: justify use of tactics appropriate for one team and one individual sport, identifying areas for improvement

To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

P1

demonstrate use of practical skills, techniques and tactics appropriate for one team and one individual sport

P2 M3

describe the rules, regulations and scoring systems for one team and one individual sport

P3

describe the main roles and responsibilities of officials in one team and one individual sport M4

P4

produce, with teacher support, an observation checklist that could be used to review the sports performance of an individual or a team

explain the strengths and weaknesses of an individual, or team, in one individual and one team sport, providing specific recommendations relating to improving upon weaknesses.

P5

use an observation checklist to review the sports performance of an individual, or team, in one individual and one team sport

describe the strengths and weaknesses of an individual, or team, in one individual and one team sport, identifying ways to improve upon weaknesses.

P6

identify the strengths and weaknesses of an individual, or team, in one individual and one team sport.

Guidance to support the assessment of this unit is available on page 48.

BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

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UNIT 6: PRACTICAL SPORT

Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery In order to study this unit learners need to have a basic knowledge of sport, a keen interest and enjoyment in taking part in the practical activities. Adequate choice should be given to learners, with a group of sports being offered such as the variety of team and individual activities listed in the unit content. The tutor will determine the amount covered, but adequate time should be given to each sport to allow for the depth and breadth of study necessary to cover the content. Long term injury need not necessarily preclude or hinder any learner from achieving this unit, as much of the unit can be focused on another learner. However, this should only be allowed in these circumstances. This unit has been designed to give learners the knowledge to develop and improve their own practical skills and techniques in sporting activities. They should also become more tactically astute in each of the sports. The time spent researching the rules, regulations, scoring systems and roles and responsibilities of the officials may also make them more competent practitioners and role models for others. Access to, and completion, of Level 1 officiating courses in each of the sports would make this section more relevant to learners. Tutors should introduce learners to skills and techniques through simple practices and drills, which show progression through to the game and/or competitive situation. Learners should produce a logbook, diary or portfolio of their experiences in the sport, including any practices, training or trials that they have completed at local, regional or national level. Observation records or feedback sheets and success in leadership or Governing Body Awards could be used as evidence of their performance. Learners will be asked to observe and analyse the performance of other players, groups or teams in each of the selected sports. Each centre will determine the focus of the observation. The tutor should encourage each learner to use a variety of methods to collate the evidence. Statistical evidence and that of a more objective nature should be used alongside subjective assessments and opinions. Tutors should spend some time in the classroom looking at different ways to gather evidence to accurately assess performance. Analysis of other players/performers should give learners the knowledge to develop and improve their own performance. As much as possible of this unit should be delivered in a practical situation. Coaches, trainers, officials from the community could be invited in to deliver some aspects. Learners could simulate the roles of different officials. Practical work should be supported by theoretical information delivered both in the field and within the classroom. Learners should be encouraged to complete their portfolio/diary/logbook on a regular and continuous basis. Assessment The learning outcomes for this unit will be assessed through a combination of written evidence, supplied by the learner, and observation records, supplied by the tutor. Learners should complete a portfolio for each of the two sports, which outlines the range of skills, techniques and tactics that they have experienced. A simple written document would be sufficient for this, and it could also include a regular analysis of strengths and weaknesses identified in each of the sessions. Learners need to input into the portfolio on a regular basis. Tutors could assist in this process by organising either regular theory sessions to write the evidence up, or leave some time at the end of each session for this to be completed. Learners are advised to talk to more experienced coaches to get the appropriate advice on how to improve their own performance. An action plan could be submitted to meet the relevant criteria.

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BF017349 Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

UNIT 6: PRACTICAL SPORT

In order to demonstrate knowledge of the rules, regulations and scoring systems of the sport learners could complete a booklet or leaflet. The ‘Know the Game’ series could be used as a basis for this with each learner producing their own resource, perhaps as a guide to real beginners in the sport. Roles and responsibilities of officials could also be included. Some of the work on this could be completed through practical application, where learners experience the different roles and responsibilities of officials. There are always some rules in sport that are contentious for both participants and spectators. Learners will need to investigate these to be able to suggest changes and therefore fulfil the requirements of the distinction criteria. An oral presentation to the tutor would be a good way for each learner to demonstrate this. Tutors could organise a festival of sport, or take learners to an established one. This will give each learner an opportunity to devise an observation checklist and to use on another athlete to analyse their performance. The learner could provide the individual or team with evidence of their performance. This could be in the form of a written report, an oral response or possibly a more elaborate presentation using modern software and analysis systems. Learners could also be put in the position of a scout, whereby they are observing and analysing the strengths and weaknesses of an individual or a team, so as to pass on to future opponents. Links to National Occupational Standards, other BTEC units, other BTEC qualifications and other relevant units and qualifications This unit has links with Unit 2: Health, Safety and Injury in Sport, Unit 4: Preparation for Sport, Unit 5: Planning and Leading Sports Activities, Unit 7: Practical Outdoor and Adventurous Activities and Unit 8: Technical Skills and Tactical Awareness for Sport. This units links to Edexcel GCSE Physical Education, and provides a progression route from the Edexcel Level 1 BTEC Introductory Certificate and Diploma in Sport and Leisure, and progression to the Edexcel Level 3 BTEC Nationals in Sport and Sport and Exercise Sciences. This unit also has links to awards and qualifications provided by national governing bodies. This unit provides learners with the opportunity to provide evidence for key skills in communication, improving own learning and performance and problem solving. Essential resources Learners will require access to the appropriate environment or facility and equipment required for the activities, as well as resources related to analysis eg recording equipment. Indicative reading for learners Materials that illustrate the level of learning required and that are particularly relevant. Tutors should be aware that textbooks are frequently updated and that they should use the latest editions where available. Examples currently include: Harris B et al — BTEC First Sport: Student Book (Heinemann, 2004) Honeybourne J — BTEC First in Sport (Nelson Thornes, 2005) Scott A — GCSE PE for Edexcel (Heinemann, 2001)

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UNIT 6: PRACTICAL SPORT

Key skills

Achievement of key skills is not a requirement of this qualification but it is encouraged. Suggestions of opportunities for the generation of level 2 key skill evidence are given here. Staff should check that learners have produced all the evidence required by part B of the key skills specifications when assessing this evidence. Learners may need to develop additional evidence elsewhere to fully meet the requirements of the key skills specifications.

Communication level 2 When learners are: • • • discussing the roles of sports officials describing the rules, regulations and scoring systems of sports researching the rules, regulations and scoring systems of sports They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: C2.1a C2.1b C2.2 Take part in a group discussion Give a talk of at least four minutes Read and summarise information from at least two documents about the same subject. Each document must be a minimum of 500 words long. • describing the rules, regulations and scoring systems of sports. C2.3 Write two different types of documents each one giving different information. One document must be at least 500 words long.

Improving own learning and performance level 2 When learners are: • • demonstrating skills and techniques They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: LP2.1 Help set targets with an appropriate person and plan how these will be met. Take responsibility for some decisions about your learning, using your plan to help meet targets and improve your performance. Review progress with an appropriate person and provide evidence of your achievements.

identifying areas of improvement LP2.2 in own performance reviewing performance and discussing observations with the tutor. LP2.3



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UNIT 6: PRACTICAL SPORT

Problem solving level 2 When learners are: • studying the effectiveness of rules, regulations and scoring systems considering adaptations to a rule or regulation and justifying why observing the impact and effect of the suggested adaptation(s) to rules and regulations. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: PS2.1 Identify a problem, with help from an appropriate person, and identify different ways of tackling it. Plan and try out at least one way of solving the problem. Check if the problem has been solved and identify ways to improve problem solving skills.

• •

PS2.2 PS2.3

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UNIT 6: PRACTICAL SPORT

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BF017349 Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

UNIT 7: PRACTICAL OUTDOOR AND ADVENTUROUS ACTIVITIES

Unit 7:
NQF Level 2:

Practical Outdoor and Adventurous Activities
BTEC First

Guided learning hours: 60

Unit abstract
The challenge of outdoor and adventurous activities lies in the associated element of uncertainty and risk. It is the very essence of uncertainty and managing risk that makes adventure appealing and exiting for so many. Only through using a combination of knowledge and skill can the participant successfully undertake outdoor and adventurous activities. The number of people participating in outdoor and adventurous activities continues to grow. This in turn has seen an explosion in travel companies promoting activity holidays and facilities, set up from comparatively new sports such as skate parks and mountain bike trails to more traditional sailing lakes or mountain trails. This growth in popularity has opened up many new employment opportunities. Learners undertaking this unit will develop their experiences, techniques, skills and knowledge in two outdoor and adventurous activities. As part of this unit learners will develop their range of techniques and then apply them skilfully to meet an appropriate challenge set. Examples may include learning the techniques of land navigation and then using these to make a journey in wild country or, after learning techniques, to climb in balance, successfully climbing a very difficult graded route. To develop learners’ knowledge, skills and understanding in their chosen adventurous activities they will take part in a planned programme under the guidance of a qualified instructor. As part of this programme learners will gain an understanding of some of the wider issues associated with their chosen outdoor and adventurous activities, such as safe participation, environmental impacts, equipment, where the local clubs are and how the sport is coordinated through the national governing body. Learners practical programmes will be planned to ensure targets for progression are set, taking into account learner ability.

Learning outcomes
On completion of this unit a learner should: 1 2 3 4 Be able to demonstrate skills and techniques associated with selected outdoor and adventurous activities Know about the organisation and provision of outdoor and adventurous activities Understand health and safety considerations and environmental impacts associated with participation in outdoor and adventurous activities Be able to review own performance in outdoor and adventurous activities.

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Unit content

1 Be able to demonstrate skills and techniques associated with selected outdoor and adventurous activities Techniques and skills: eg movement, tactics, use of equipment, decision-making, communication, interaction, specific to activities Outdoor and adventurous activities: eg orienteering, rock climbing, skiing, snowboarding, canoeing, kayaking, sailing, windsurfing, mountain biking, body boarding, surfing Recording evidence: eg diary, logbook, portfolio, video, audio, observation record, feedback sheets 2 Know about the organisation and provision of outdoor and adventurous activities Organisation: eg national governing bodies, coaching schemes and leadership awards, clubs, training opportunities, employment Provision: eg local, national, access, range, geographical differences, sites and centres 3 Understand health and safety considerations and environmental impacts associated with participation in outdoor and adventurous activities Health and safety: eg national governing body guidelines, Adventurous Activities Licensing Authority, Health and Safety Executive Environmental impacts: eg erosion, wildlife disturbance, pollution, construction of facilities Risk assessments: hazard; who might be affected; likelihood of occurrence; severity; risk rating; measures to minimise risk 4 Be able to review own performance in outdoor and adventurous activities Review: feedback (from participants, supervisor, peers, observers); strengths and areas for improvement; against plan and governing body guidelines Set targets: specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, time-bound (SMART); development plans; development opportunities eg specific training and courses

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UNIT 7: PRACTICAL OUTDOOR AND ADVENTUROUS ACTIVITIES

Grading grid

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all of the learning outcomes for the unit. The criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit.

Grading criteria To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to: M1 D1 review and justify choice of techniques demonstrated in outdoor and adventurous activities compare the organisation and provision of two outdoor and adventurous activities D2 To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to:

To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

P1

demonstrate techniques and skills appropriate to two outdoor and adventurous activities M2 M3

P2

describe the organisation and provision of two outdoor and adventurous activities

explain precautions and actions that can be taken, or used, in relation to health and safety considerations associated with participation in two outdoor and adventurous activities explain precautions and actions that can be taken, or used, to reduce the environmental impacts associated with participation in two outdoor and adventurous activities

P3

describe health and safety considerations associated with participation in two outdoor and adventurous activities explain health and safety considerations associated with participation in two outdoor and adventurous activities, identifying precautions and actions that can be taken, or used, in relation to them

P4 M4

describe environmental impacts associated with participation in two outdoor and adventurous activities

D3

P5

produce a risk assessment for a selected outdoor and adventurous activity

justify recommendations relating to identified areas for improvement, in their performance in outdoor and adventurous activities, and describe specific related activities.

P6 M5

review their own performance in participating in outdoor and adventurous activities, identifying strengths and areas for improvement.

explain the environmental impacts associated with participation in two outdoor and adventurous activities, identifying precautions and actions that can be taken, or used, to reduce them explain identified strengths and areas for improvement in their performance in outdoor and adventurous activities, making recommendations for further development of identified areas for improvement.

Guidance to support the assessment of this unit is available on page 56. 55

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UNIT 7: PRACTICAL OUTDOOR AND ADVENTUROUS ACTIVITIES

Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery The delivery of this unit should be predominantly practically based, with theory sessions used to reinforce and underpin skill acquisition and understanding. Learners will need to be supervised by a suitably qualified instructor, or member of staff, and tutors need to be aware of their legal responsibilities. Centres should recognise that learners need experience, and train, in at least two outdoor and adventurous activities and that their previous experience and ability should be taken into account. This unit gives learners the knowledge and opportunity to develop, and improve, their own practical skills and techniques in outdoor and adventurous activities. Learners should chose activities to which they have adequate access. Activity locations need to be selected with the objectives of the session and the ability of the group in mind. Locations should lend themselves to safely extending learners’ techniques, skills, and knowledge of the activity. This may involve travelling away to suitable locations. However, the use of local resources to help develop basic techniques and skills should not be overlooked. An example of this would be using a local indoor climbing wall before travelling to a rock climbing site or navigating on a local orienteering course to develop map and compass skills before travelling to a mountainous area to engage in hill walking. The health and safety considerations associated with outdoor and adventurous activities should be covered. Learners should also cover the impact that such activities can have on the environment. Learners should be made aware of the risk factors associated with outdoor and adventurous activities. Learners should also be taught about the organisation and provision of outdoor and adventurous activities. Learners will be asked to review their own performance in each of the selected sports. The tutor should encourage each learner to use a variety of methods to collate their evidence. Feedback from others, eg participants, supervisor, peers, and observers should be used to identify strengths and areas for improvement. Tutors should spend some time ensuring that learners’ targets conform to SMART criteria. Assessment Assessment of this unit lends itself to a variety of methods, combining written evidence, supplied by the learner, and observation records, supplied by observers, and tutors. Learners will need to follow a planned training programme to develop and demonstrate techniques that they have successfully mastered in each of their chosen activities. Learners should be able to make a basic assessment of their own ability and understand how and when to use the techniques they have been taught. This may be evidenced through an observation report followed up by an oral review after each training session. A dairy or log should be kept by the learner for all training sessions and learners should reflect on their strengths and areas of improvement using this means. Building on their understanding and ability to demonstrate individual techniques, learners should be set appropriate challenges so that they have to select and use their techniques skilfully. Tutors may wish to use video evidence and observation reports to evidence this practical aspect. 56
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UNIT 7: PRACTICAL OUTDOOR AND ADVENTUROUS ACTIVITIES

To provide learners with a sound understanding of their chosen activities they will research the organisation and provision of the selected activities. This may take the form of a booklet, presentation, posters or written report produced to introduce people into the opportunities their chosen activities or similar. Learners should ensure that whatever method they use they show a good awareness of how their activity is organised and what provision exists both locally and nationally. Learners are required to investigate employment opportunities and this may take the form of a collection of adverts from magazines or from the internet where applicable. Learners will need to demonstrate a sound knowledge of the health and safety considerations related to their chosen activities and produce a risk assessment. This should take into account the full range of hazards and risks including realistic actions required to minimise risk to an acceptable level. Learners may model their report on an example of good practice using an outdoor centre or local education authority format. However, it should be stressed that although the framework may be adopted, the actual identification of, hazards and risks, and actions to be taken, should be their own work. Learners are required to show a good awareness of the environmental impacts associated with participation and actions that can be taken to minimise these. This may be completed either researching into a local or national example. To be able review their own performance learners will require a good knowledge and understanding of their activities. It may help if learners have some framework to guide them and it is suggested that a SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) may prove helpful. Areas of strength and opportunities for improvement should include a rationale as to how these conclusions were arrived at. Learners may wish to refer to feedback from instructors/teachers, video evidence or similar. Based on this assessment, learners should make recommendations for improvement of their performance. Learners will need to provide a future training plan taking into account SMART targets (specific measurable, attainable, realistic, time bound) and identifying resources required to progress. It is not necessary for the learner to then follow this programme. Links to National Occupational Standards, other BTEC units, other BTEC qualifications and other relevant units and qualifications This unit has links with Unit 2: Health, Safety and Injury in Sport, Unit 4: Preparation for Sport, Unit 6: Practical Sport, Unit 16: Leading Outdoor and Adventurous Activities and Unit 17: Expedition Experience. This unit provides a progression route to the Edexcel Level 3 BTEC Nationals in Sport and Sport and Exercise Sciences. This unit also has links to awards and qualifications provided by lead and governing bodies. This unit provides learners with the opportunity to provide evidence for key skills in communication, improving own learning and performance, problem solving and working with others. Essential resources Learners will need access to the appropriate environment or facility and equipment required for the activities, for example navigational equipment, camping equipment (such as tents and cooking equipment), emergency equipment (such as first aid).

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Indicative reading for learners Materials that illustrate the level of learning required and that are particularly relevant. Journals and magazines which may support the delivery of this unit include: Canoeist Climber Mountain Biking UK Paddles Snowboard UK Windsurf Yachts and yachting

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BF017349 Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

UNIT 7: PRACTICAL OUTDOOR AND ADVENTUROUS ACTIVITIES

Key skills

Achievement of key skills is not a requirement of this qualification but it is encouraged. Suggestions of opportunities for the generation of level 2 key skill evidence are given here. Staff should check that learners have produced all the evidence required by part B of the key skills specifications when assessing this evidence. Learners may need to develop additional evidence elsewhere to fully meet the requirements of the key skills specifications.

Communication level 2 When learners are: • describing the organisation and provision of outdoor and adventurous activities researching the health and safety considerations of outdoor and adventurous activities describing the environmental impacts of outdoor and adventurous activities. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: C2.1a C2.1b C2.2 Take part in a group discussion Give a talk of at least four minutes Read and summarise information from at least two documents about the same subject. Each document must be a minimum of 500 words long. C2.3 Write two different types of documents each one giving different information. One document must be at least 500 words long.





Improving own learning and performance level 2 When learners are: • reviewing their performance in outdoor and adventurous activities, and considering future development and improvement. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: LP2.1 LP2.2 Help set targets with an appropriate person and plan how these will be met. Take responsibility for some decisions about your learning, using your plan to help meet targets and improve your performance. Review progress with an appropriate person and provide evidence of your achievements.

LP2.3 Problem solving level 2 When learners are: • conducting a risk assessment related to a selected outdoor and adventurous activity.

They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: PS2.1 Identify a problem, with help from an appropriate person, and identify different ways of tackling it. Plan and try out at least one way of solving the problem. Check if the problem has been solved and identify ways to improve problem solving skills. 59

PS2.2 PS2.3

BF017349 – Specification – Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport – Issue 2 – March 2007 © Edexcel Limited 2007

UNIT 7: PRACTICAL OUTDOOR AND ADVENTUROUS ACTIVITIES

Working with others level 2 When learners are: • participating in outdoor and adventurous activities and reviewing their performance. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: WO2.1 Plan work with others. WO2.2 Work co-operatively towards achieving the identified objectives. WO2.3 Review your contribution and agree ways to improve work with others.

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UNIT 8: TECHNICAL SKILLS AND TACTICAL AWARENESS FOR SPORT

Unit 8:
NQF Level 2:

Technical Skills and Tactical Awareness for Sport
BTEC First

Guided learning hours: 60 hours

Unit abstract
Some technical skills are general and can be used commonly in all sports. Such skills include running, jumping throwing and catching. Other technical skills are specific to only a few sports, or even only one Sport. Such skills include the volleyball serve, the golf swing and the sprint start used in athletics. Tactics are actions and strategies planned to achieve an overall goal. In sport that goal is predominantly ‘to win’. Tactics can depend on a number of factors, such as opposition, players available for selection, the importance of the game/match and possibly even the weather. Even the greatest sports performers in the world must have tactical awareness and consider such factors. In order for learners to assess their own technical and tactical skills they must take part in some form of assessment. The simplest, most frequent and typical form is observation of performance in a competitive situation. Analysis is critical in sport, since it forms the basis for planning the next phase or session in the programme of a competitive athlete. A coach may even use this process in the selection of players for squads, teams or centres. The next stage of this analysis will involve the development of a training programme which should involve the development of at least one specific technical skill. The programme should also develop at least one area of tactical progression that will develop the player or the teams’ tactical awareness.

Learning outcomes
On completion of this unit a learner should: 1 2 3 4 Understand the technical and tactical demands of a selected sport Be able to assess technical skills and tactical awareness in a selected sport Be able to complete a programme to develop their own technical skills and tactical awareness Be able to monitor and evaluate their own technical and tactical development and set goals for further development.

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UNIT 8: TECHNICAL SKILLS AND TACTICAL AWARENESS FOR SPORT

Unit content

1 Understand the technical and tactical demands of a selected sport Technical demands: skills eg continuous (running), serial (high jump), discrete (golf swing) Tactical demands: eg positioning, choice and use of correct/appropriate strokes, variation, conditions, use of space 2 Be able to assess technical skills and tactical awareness in a selected sport Performance analysis: eg observation and video analysis, notational analysis Analysis model: analyse; evaluate; plan; perform; observe Strengths and weaknesses: relating to performance demands eg performance profiling; technical skills and tactical awareness Elite performance: eg professional athletes, national representatives, national record holders, world record holders, national champions, Olympians Methods of assessment: eg analysis and observation (self, peers, coaches, trainers) interviews, presentation of skills and abilities, SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats), performance profiling 3 Be able to complete a six-week programme to develop their own technical skills and tactical awareness. Aims and objectives: based on strengths and weaknesses identified from player analysis eg technical (shooting and hitting target when outside of the penalty area), tactical (marking attackers during set plays) Targets: specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, time-bound (SMART) Training: eg planned, structured, warm up and warm down/cool down Technical development: specific practices to work on specific technical weaknesses Tactical development: through participating against different levels of participants in a variety of practices Recording documentation: eg log or diary 4 Be able to monitor and evaluate their own performance and set long term goals for their technical and tactical development Monitor: eg targets, assessments, types of activities Evaluate: eg performance against targets, factors affecting technical and tactical development, recommendations for future plans and activities with timescales Goals: long-term and short-term; negotiated between player and coach/teacher; specific (to a situation and or the performer), measurable, achievable, realistic, time-bound (SMART)

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UNIT 8: TECHNICAL SKILLS AND TACTICAL AWARENESS FOR SPORT

Grading grid

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all of the learning outcomes for the unit. The criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit.

Grading criteria To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to: M1 explain the technical and tactical demands of a chosen sport M2 assess the technical skills and tactical awareness of an elite performer, explaining strengths and weaknesses M3 assess their own technical skills and tactical awareness, in a chosen sport, explaining strengths and weaknesses M4 independently produce a six-week training programme to develop their own technical skills and tactical awareness, describing strengths and areas for improvement, and suggesting ways in which it could be improved. M5 independently describe their own development, explaining their goals for technical and tactical development. To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to: D1 compare and contrast their own technical skills and tactical awareness with those of an elite performer and the demands of a chosen sport D2 evaluate the training programme, justifying suggestions made regarding improvement D3 analyse their goals for technical and tactical development, suggesting how these goals could be achieved, recommending specific activities.

To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

P1 describe the technical and tactical demands of a chosen sport

P2 assess the technical skills of an elite performer, identifying strengths and weaknesses

P3 assess the tactical awareness of an elite performer, identifying strengths and weaknesses

P4 assess their own technical skills, in a chosen sport, identifying strengths and weaknesses

P5 assess their own tactical awareness, in a chosen sport, identifying strengths and weaknesses

P6 produce a six-week training programme, with teacher support, to develop their own technical skills and tactical awareness

P7 undertake a six-week training programme to develop their own technical skills and tactical awareness, commenting on strengths and areas for improvement in the programme

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UNIT 8: TECHNICAL SKILLS AND TACTICAL AWARENESS FOR SPORT

Grading criteria To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to: To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to:

To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

P8 monitor and review their own development, identifying goals for further technical and tactical development, with teacher support.

Guidance to support the assessment of this unit is available on page 66.

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UNIT 8: TECHNICAL SKILLS AND TACTICAL AWARENESS FOR SPORT

Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery This unit should be viewed as a development of an individual’s technical skills and tactical awareness. The completion of this unit could be run alongside National Governing Body coaching awards at Level 1 or Level 2 (dependent upon the learners). The unit aims to provide learners with more knowledge about the skills required to compete in a specific sport. Input from tutors is necessary to cover the basics of technical skills and tactical awareness in sport in general. However, specialists from selected sports may be required to provide an input on the importance of technical skills and tactical awareness in their sport. When assessing technical skills and tactical awareness in sport, tutors should undertake player analysis with learners, to ensure that learners are aware of the requirements of this method of analysis. This could start with learners undertaking video analysis so that play can be watched over and over again if required. Learners should be guided towards using notational analysis to ensure that evidence is collated. After video analysis learners should be able to complete live analysis of their peers during sports performance. Practise is the key to ensuring understanding and the ability to complete such forms of analysis. Learners will also have to complete a selfanalysis as part of the unit. Analysis of elite performance can either be done by direct observation or through alternative means, for example video or a live event. A variety of other assessment methods should also be addressed by the tutor to ensure that learners are aware of the variety of player assessments that could be carried out by coaches, teachers, media etc. After completion of player analysis learners should be able to identify the strengths and weaknesses of performers and themselves. If weaknesses are not easily recognised then the analysis should be closely scrutinised by learners to help them pick up on specific areas of technical weakness in performance. These areas of development will be the aims of the training programme produced by the learner. The construction and completion of the training programme should be monitored by the tutor. However, each learner should be allocated a mentor (this might be a team coach or trainer) who will assist in the construction of the programme, if required, and observe the completion of the training programme. The learner should set specific targets for the six-week training programme that are based around the technical and tactical development of their performance. The training programme should last six-weeks and should be recorded by learners in form of a log or diary that comments on developments or problems that may have occurred. After completion of the training programme learners will be expected to evaluate their performance and set long term goals for their technical and tactical development. Tutors should deliver ways of monitoring development and setting targets for future development. Learners should be supervised, if required, to set such targets and recommend activities that could help meet these targets.

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UNIT 8: TECHNICAL SKILLS AND TACTICAL AWARENESS FOR SPORT

Assessment The learning outcomes of this unit require a variety of assessment methods. When examining the technical and tactical demands of a selected sport learners could produce a presentation explaining the requirements of the sport. When assessing technical skills and tactical awareness learners could complete two forms of player analysis for an elite performer in a selected sport. Tutors could ask learners to complete a notational analysis with an explanation of their findings, discussing strengths and weaknesses. Learners may also complete two analysis forms one for technical skills and another for tactical awareness. The action plan that is required for the distinction criterion should provide the elite performer with actual activities that will enable their technical and tactical development. Tutors, coaches, peers may advise the learner on such activities. In order to complete a six-week programme to develop their own technical and tactical skills learners should complete a player analysis on themselves which could be completed following a variety of assessment methods. Tutor support can be provided if required and support can be given from other professionals who may be involved within learners’ clubs or sports teams. The training programme should be developed from the identified weaknesses. The training programme should consist of actual activities that the learner will participate in and be based around actual session plans. The learner could also evaluate the training programme after completion making comments about specific activities selected. The programme must be completed by the learner and a diary or log of each session should be completed to track progress towards the goals set at the start of the programme. If the learner is injured then the process must be completed for a sports performer who is from the same team or club, of a similar age, and competing in the same event, position or discipline. After completion of the training programme learners should be advised to complete a written report that describes their specific development. The report should also include areas for long term development. Targets should be set together with an explanation of how these areas could improve performance in the long-term. Links to National Occupational Standards, other BTEC units, other BTEC qualifications and other relevant units and qualifications This unit has links with Unit 6: Practical Sport, Unit 9: Psychology for Sports Performance, Unit 10: Nutrition for Sports Performance, Unit 11: Fitness for Sports Performance and Unit 12: Lifestyle and Sports Performance. This unit has links to the Edexcel GCSE Physical Education, and offers progression to the Edexcel Level 3 BTEC Nationals in Sport and Sport and Exercise Sciences. This unit also has links to awards and qualifications provided by national governing bodies and SportsCoachUK as well as the Junior and Community Sports Leaders Awards from the British Sports Trust. This unit has links to the National Occupational Standards in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance at Level 3, particularly Units ES1: Plan, develop and apply your technical skills and ES3: Plan, develop and apply your tactical skills. This unit provides learners with the opportunity to provide evidence for key skills in communication, improving own learning and performance and problem solving. Essential resources Learners will require access to appropriate facilities to undertake the required physical and sports activities.

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UNIT 8: TECHNICAL SKILLS AND TACTICAL AWARENESS FOR SPORT

Indicative reading for learners Materials that illustrate the level of learning required and that are particularly relevant. Tutors should be aware that textbooks are frequently updated and that they should use the latest editions where available. Examples currently include: Butcher R — Performance Profiling (Coachwise, 1996) Harris B et al — BTEC First Sport: Student Book (Heinemann, 2004) Honeybourne J — BTEC First in Sport (Nelson Thornes, 2005) Scott A — GCSE PE for Edexcel (Heinemann, 2001)

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UNIT 8: TECHNICAL SKILLS AND TACTICAL AWARENESS FOR SPORT

Key skills

Achievement of key skills is not a requirement of this qualification but it is encouraged. Suggestions of opportunities for the generation of level 2 key skill evidence are given here. Staff should check that learners have produced all the evidence required by part B of the key skills specifications when assessing this evidence. Learners may need to develop additional evidence elsewhere to fully meet the requirements of the key skills specifications.

Communication level 2 When learners are: • describing the and tactical technical demands of a chosen sport describing the and tactical technical demands of a chosen sport researching the technical and tactical demands of a selected sport developing and evaluating a programme to develop their own technical and tactical ability. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: C2.1a Take part in a group discussion



C2.1b

Give a talk of at least four minutes



C2.2

Read and summarise information from at least two documents about the same subject. Each document must be a minimum of 500 words long.



C2.3

Write two different types of documents each one giving different information. One document must be at least 500 words long.

Improving own learning and performance level 2 When learners are: • • producing a training programme with tutor support undertaking a training programme monitoring and reviewing their progress, identifying areas for improvement. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: LP2.1 LP2.2 Help set targets with an appropriate person and plan how these will be met. Take responsibility for some decisions about your learning, using your plan to help meet targets and improve your performance. Review progress with an appropriate person and provide evidence of your achievements.



LP2.3

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UNIT 8: TECHNICAL SKILLS AND TACTICAL AWARENESS FOR SPORT

Problem solving level 2 When learners are: • They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: Identify a problem, with help from an appropriate person, and identify different ways of tackling it. Plan and try out at least one way of solving the problem. Check if the problem has been solved and identify ways to improve problem solving skills.

assessing their own technical and PS2.1 tactical awareness planning and undertaking a training programme reviewing the training programme. PS2.2 PS2.3

• •

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UNIT 9: PSYCHOLOGY FOR SPORTS PERFORMANCE

Unit 9:
NQF Level 2:

Psychology for Sports Performance
BTEC First

Guided learning hours: 60 hours

Unit abstract The role the mind plays in sports performance is vital to success and the discipline of sports psychology is growing and becoming more evident in all sports. This unit will introduce the learner to the concept of sport psychology. It will also allow the learner to put the knowledge gained in the unit into practice by completing a six-week programme that aims to develop attitudes and mental skills in their sports performance. The unit will develop learners’ understanding of the importance of applying psychology in sport. Learners will have the opportunity to examine the role of psychology in sport and its potential for contributing to enhanced performance. This unit will also introduce the learner to the important factors that must be considered when mentally preparing performers. Through completion of this unit the learner will be expected to examine the concept of psychology in sport and evaluate the psychological demands in their selected sports. This unit develops the learner’s understanding of how motivation and personality factors influence the performer’s ability to reach their true potential. It will develop the learner’s awareness of how aggression affects performance and of the impact of external factors on both behaviour and performance in sport. This unit should help the learners to apply basic psychological theory to actual sport performance and provide the opportunity for them to construct effective methods to improve specific mental skills in their chosen sport.

Learning outcomes
On completion of this unit a learner should: 1 2 3 4 Understand the psychological demands of a selected sport Understand the impact motivation can have on sports performance Understand the effects of personality and aggression on sports performance Be able to assess their own attitudes and mental skills, in order to develop a programme to enhance their own sports performance.

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Unit content

1 Understand the psychological demands of a selected sport Psychological demands: the types of attitudes and mental skills needed to perform at the highest level eg concentration, decision making and problem solving 2 Understand the impact motivation can have on sports performance Motivation: definition; different reasons or motives for sport participants eg achievement motivation, attribution theory; intrinsic and extrinsic effectiveness in motivating different sports performers (beginners and experts, professionals and amateurs); strategies to maintain and increase motivation (goal setting, imagery, self-talk) 3 Understand the effect of personality and aggression in sports performance Personality: definition; impact of personality on sports participation eg introvert athletes predominantly playing individual sports, extrovert athletes predominantly playing team sports ; traits; types (eg introverts and extroverts, type A and type B); theories Aggression: definitions (aggression and assertion); differentiation between aggression and assertion; types of aggression eg assertion, hostile, instrumental Controlling aggression: methods eg anger management, controlled breathing exercises; ways to enhance performance through controlling aggression 4 Be able to assess their own attitudes and mental skills, in order to develop a programme to enhance their own sports performance Assessment: eg analysis (coach, self, peer), strengths, weaknesses opportunities, threats, (SWOT), performance profiling Programme: objectives (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, time-bound — SMART) eg ability to focus and refocus, motivation, confidence, attention and concentration, anxiety and dealing with worry, dealing with success and failure, professional attitude, teamwork; goals (short-term, medium-term, long-term); strategies eg imagery, visualisation, self-talk Recording: eg diary, logbook, portfolio, video, audio, observation record, witness testimony, feedback sheets Evaluation: against objectives and goals; strategies for future attainment

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UNIT 9: PSYCHOLOGY FOR SPORTS PERFORMANCE

Grading grid

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all of the learning outcomes for the unit. The criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit.

Grading criteria To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to: M1 D1 D2 D3 M2 explain the impact of motivation on sports performance and strategies that can be used to maintain and increase motivation explain strategies that can be adopted to control aggression independently assess their own attitudes and mental skills in a selected sport, explaining areas for improvement independently plan and carry out a six-week training programme, to improve attitudes and mental skills in a selected sport explain the psychological demands of a selected sport To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to: analyse strategies used to maintain and increase motivation for sports performance evaluate the strategies that can be adopted to control aggression

To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

P1

describe the psychological demands of a selected sport

P2

describe the impact of motivation on sports performance and identify strategies that can be used to maintain and increase motivation M3 M4

P3

describe personality and identify how it affects sports performance

P4

describe aggression and identify strategies that can be adopted to control it M5

evaluate the training programme, justifying suggestions relating to improvement, including specific activities in relation to their own attitudes and mental skills in a selected sport.

P5

assess their own attitudes and mental skills, with teacher support, in a selected sport, identifying areas for improvement M6

P6

plan, and carry out, a six-week training programme, with teacher support, to improve attitudes and mental skills in a selected sport

P7

evaluate the training programme, identifying areas for improvement.

evaluate the training programme, explaining areas for improvement, and making suggestions as to how improvements could be achieved.

Guidance to support the assessment of this unit is available on page 74.

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Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery This unit should be viewed as an introduction to sports psychology. Learners who complete this unit should be participating in sport at a competitive level on a regular basis. The learner should have access to a coach/coaching team. The unit will provide a basic introduction for of each of the learning outcomes. Tutors are advised to stick to the unit content and use it as guidance as to the level that learners need to attain. Input from tutors is necessary in order to cover the theoretical aspects of the unit. However, the unit should be delivered in a practical environment wherever possible. Learners should conduct psychological experiments. Learners will also require information on how to mentally prepare for sports performance and ways in which this can be done effectively. When assessing their own attitudes and mental skills learners should be advised to undertake a variety of assessments to gain this information, for example performance profiling. These could be completed by the coach, peers, parents or self. Once learners have completed assessments they should be directed towards setting specific aims for their development programme. Examples of aims may be ability to focus and refocus, motivation levels, confidence during sports performance, attention and concentration in a match situation, anxiety and dealing with worry, dealing with success and failure, control and self regulation, professional attitude, teamwork skills. Once these aims have been agreed the learner can then plan the programme to meet the psychological demands identified through the assessment. The plan itself should be over a period of six-weeks, during this period the learner must complete a diary/logbook that will clearly show progression towards the aims. After completion of the training programme learners will evaluate their development against the specified aims, and will be expected to set themselves long-term goals for enhancing psychological performance in sport. The learner should identify with coaching staff and other experts, how these goals could be fully attained and what activities could be undertaken to ensure that the goals are met in full. Assessment When considering assessment strategies tutors should consider the theoretical requirements of this unit and the practical elements that require assessment. The assessment criteria should be broken down into the relevant learning outcomes and delivered as a variety of assessments rather than a single unit assessment. Through separating the assessment the tutor can divide the diverse content of this unit up and create challenging scenarios that will be vocationally relevant for learners. When covering the psychological demands of a selected sport, tutors could ask learners to complete a report on the psychological demands of their specific sport. To ensure that this report is vocationally relevant, learners should be advised to complete the report on their own sport. The impact that motivation has upon sports performance could be presented in the form of a poster/leaflet which could focus on professional athletes. The poster/leaflet should include the impact motivation can have on improving sports performance, and the role that goal setting can have on this continuum.

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UNIT 9: PSYCHOLOGY FOR SPORTS PERFORMANCE

Through the form of a report learners should be asked to describe different types of personality and if possible make reference to professionals sports people who would be extreme personality types. When describing the effect personality has on sports performance learners should be again using relevant role models from the world of sport and commenting on their success or failure. Tutors should ask learners to complete presentation materials on aggression and strategies that can be adopted to control aggression during sports performance. The presentation should also examine the role aggression can play in sport. Learners should again be advised to concentrate on their own sport and possibly select role models who have used aggression in a positive and negative way. When learners are completing their psychological assessments it is important that the methods used are recorded and discussed by learners in a written format. After the assessment has taken place learners should then consult tutors, coaches, sports psychologists and discuss a programme that could be implemented to improve their mental skills and attitudes during sports performance. The support which the learner requires to put this information together should determine the grade awarded. The learner should then carry out the six-week programme and record the developments in a log or diary. This should be completed after each session providing information on the development of the mental skills and attitudes. After completion of the programme the learner should complete an evaluation of the programme and examine areas for improvement and discuss how these areas could be improved for future performance. Links to National Occupational Standards, other BTEC units, other BTEC qualifications and other relevant units and qualifications This unit has links with Unit 6: Practical Sport, Unit 8: Technical Skills and Tactical Awareness for Sport, Unit 10: Nutrition for Sports Performance, Unit 11: Fitness for Sports Performance and Unit 12: Lifestyle and Sports Performance. This unit has links to the Edexcel GCSE Physical Education, and offers progression to the Edexcel Level 3 BTEC Nationals in Sport and Sport and Exercise Sciences. This unit has links to the National Occupational Standards in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance at Level 3, particularly Unit ES4: Develop the attitudes and mental skills necessary for excellent performance. This unit provides learners with the opportunity to provide evidence for keys skills in communication, improving own learning and performance and problem solving. Essential resources Learners will need access to sources of information relating to sports psychology, and also the facilities and equipment required for physical activity and sport. Indicative reading for learners Materials that illustrate the level of learning required and that are particularly relevant. Tutors should be aware that textbooks are frequently updated and that they should use the latest editions where available. Examples currently include: Butcher R — Performance Profiling (Coachwise, 1996) Harris B et al — BTEC First Sport: Student Book (Heinemann, 2004) Honeybourne J — BTEC First in Sport (Nelson Thornes, 2005)

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Key skills

Achievement of key skills is not a requirement of this qualification but it is encouraged. Suggestions of opportunities for the generation of level 2 key skill evidence are given here. Staff should check that learners have produced all the evidence required by part B of the key skills specifications when assessing this evidence. Learners may need to develop additional evidence elsewhere to fully meet the requirements of the key skills specifications.

Communication level 2 When learners are: • describing the psychological demands of sport and the impact of motivation, personality and aggression on sport researching the psychological demands of sport and the impact of motivation, personality and aggression on sport planning a training programme related to their own mental attitudes and skills in sport. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: C2.1a Take part in a group discussion

C2.1b • C2.2

Give a talk of at least four minutes Read and summarise information from at least two documents about the same subject. Each document must be a minimum of 500 words long.



C2.3

Write two different types of documents each one giving different information. One document must be at least 500 words long.

Improving own learning and performance level 2 When learners are: • discussing and agreeing a training programme for improving their mental attitudes and skills in sport, with support from coach/tutor implementing their training programme for improving mental attitudes and skills in sport, with support from coach/tutor reviewing the strengths of the training programme for improving mental attitudes and skills in sport, and identify areas for improvement. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: LP2.1 Help set targets with an appropriate person and plan how these will be met.



LP2.2

Take responsibility for some decisions about your learning, using your plan to help meet targets and improve your performance.



LP2.3

Review progress with an appropriate person and provide evidence of your achievements.

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UNIT 9: PSYCHOLOGY FOR SPORTS PERFORMANCE

Problem solving level 2 When learners are: • assessing their own attitudes and mental skills planning their training programme reviewing their training programme. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: PS2.1 Identify a problem, with help from an appropriate person, and identify different ways of tackling it. Plan and try out at least one way of solving the problem. Check if the problem has been solved and identify ways to improve problem solving skills.

• •

PS2.2 PS2.3

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UNIT 10: NUTRITION FOR SPORTS PERFORMANCE

Unit 10:
NQF Level 2:

Nutrition for Sports Performance
BTEC First

Guided learning hours: 60

Unit abstract
Nutrition affects both general health and physical performance. The foods and fluids consumed before, during and after exercise provide the energy and nutrients the body needs to perform at its best. A healthy, well-balanced diet is a key factor in the success of any athlete. Intense training is not possible unless the right foods are eaten in the right amounts. This is especially true of athletes performing more than one training session per day and training on consecutive days. Poor nutrition can lead to illnesses, injuries, poor training days and poor competitive performances. Nutrition also plays an important role in body composition and weight control. This unit will involve learners working with experienced and proficient coaching staff and other experts such as nutritionists. The aim of the unit is to enable learners to develop the skills and knowledge to work with specialist staff to plan, implement and evaluate a personal nutritional strategy specific to their sporting goals. The first part of the unit looks at the energy demands and nutritional needs of a selected sport and learners will also assesses their current diet. Learners develop an understanding of the nutrients essential to health, healthy eating guidelines and sports specific nutritional requirements. They are required to keep a food diary and assess their current diet identifying strengths and weaknesses. In the second part of the unit learners will work with specialist staff to plan, implement and evaluate a personal nutritional strategy. Learners are required to plan a nutritional strategy which covers type of food, quantity, timing, re-hydration and supplementation. This nutritional strategy is then implemented and evaluated with modifications made as required.

Learning outcomes
On completion of this unit a learner should: 1 2 3 4 Understand the nutritional requirements of a selected sport Be able to assess their own diet Be able to plan a personal nutritional strategy Be able to implement and evaluate a personal nutritional strategy.

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UNIT 10: NUTRITION FOR SPORTS PERFORMANCE

Unit content

1

Understand the nutritional requirements of a selected sport Nutrients: carbohydrates; fat; protein; water; vitamins; minerals; functions and dietary sources Healthy diet: balance of good health; preparation of food; importance (general health and lifestyle, energy levels, training and competition performance) Sports specific requirements: before, during and after training; before during and after competition; during rest periods; supplements; hydration; energy intake; meal planning

2

Be able to assess their own diet Collecting and collating information: eg food diaries, type, amount, timing, feelings Assess: eg comparison with relevant guidelines, paper-based calculations, dietary analysis software Report: identify strengths and areas for improvement eg eating less or more food, eating less or more of a particular food group, eating at different times, preparing food in a different way, drinking more fluid or drinking different types of fluid

3

Be able to plan a personal nutritional strategy Nutritional strategy: eg food groups, balance of good health, rehydration, preparation, quantity, timing, energy intake, avoidance of substances that have a negative impact, supplementation (energy bars, vitamin and mineral supplements, creatine, protein powders) Meal plans: eg type, amount, preparation, fluid Advisor: eg coaching staff, nutritionists, tutors

4

Be able to implement and evaluate a personal nutritional strategy Implement: before, during and after training; before, during and after competition; food diaries Monitoring and evaluation: eg how the nutritional strategy is meeting needs, adopting the nutritional strategy, how the nutritional strategy fits in with likes, dislikes and lifestyle, cost, results, modify strategy as required

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UNIT 10: NUTRITION FOR SPORTS PERFORMANCE

Grading grid

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all of the learning outcomes for the unit. The criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit.

Grading criteria To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to: M1 D1 D2 M2 Explain the nutritional requirements of a selected sport To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to: Evaluate the nutritional requirements of a selected sport describing suitable meal plans Justify recommendations made regarding improving their own diet, in relation to sports performance and training D3 Justify recommendations made regarding improving the personal nutritional strategy.

To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

P1

Describe the nutritional requirements of a selected sport

P2

Collect and collate information on their own diet for two weeks

P3 M3 M4 Contribute own ideas to the design of a personal nutritional strategy

Describe the strengths of their own diet and identify areas for improvement, in relation to sports performance and training

Explain the strengths of their own diet and make recommendations as to how it could be improved, in relation to sports performance and training

P4

Describe a personal nutritional strategy, designed and agreed with an advisor

P5

Implement a personal nutritional strategy

P6

Describe the strengths of the nutritional strategy and identify areas for improvement.

Explain the strengths of the personal nutritional strategy and make recommendations as to how it could be improved.

Guidance to support the assessment of this unit is available on page 82.

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UNIT 10: NUTRITION FOR SPORTS PERFORMANCE

Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery Learners need to understand the nutritional demands and energy requirements of a selected sport. The topic should be introduced with the tutor identifying the importance of a healthy diet for general health and lifestyle and for competitive performance. The nutrients essential to health, the function of these nutrients and food sources should also be covered. Learners can carry out activities where they identify the main nutrient(s) in a range of different foods. Healthy eating guidelines should then be discussed, looking at the food groups, and how to ensure a balanced diet. Sports specific nutritional requirements need to cover pre and post training and competition, rest periods and also hydration. Learners can look at the benefits and drawbacks of a range of nutritional supplements through individual or group research. Meal planning will enable learners to apply their knowledge. Learners need to be able to assess a diet. This involves recording all food consumed in a diary or log then comparing the results with recommended guidelines. Learners need to understand the range of information a food diary needs to include and they should be introduced to paper-based and electronic methods of analysing dietary information. It is recognised that not all centres will have access to computer software so this method of dietary analysis does not actually have to be carried out. It is important to give learners the opportunity to practise examining diets of sports people and giving nutritional advice. This should give them the knowledge and skills to identify the strengths of their current diet and areas for improvement. Learners need to understand how to plan a personal nutritional strategy. A nutritional strategy should include food groups and quantities, rehydration and fluid intake, preparation of food, timing of food intake and supplementation. It would be useful for learners to see examples of nutritional strategies of elite performers. Learners should practise recommending nutritional strategies using case studies. Learners also need to be aware of who can help them devise a personal nutritional strategy. Learners should then plan their own with support. It is often unrealistic for the nutritional strategy to be ideal; what it should do is move the learner towards a better diet. The final part of this unit requires learners to implement, monitor and evaluate their personal nutritional strategy; the implemented strategy should cover a period of two weeks. The skills required to monitor and evaluate a nutritional strategy should be developed through case studies and role play. The input of a qualified nutritionist and of a sports nutritionist would provide a valuable addition to the delivery of this unit. Assessment In order to achieve a pass grade learners need to describe the nutritional requirements of a selected sport. This can be done through a written report or presentation. The requirements of a healthy diet and sports specific nutritional requirements should both be covered. In terms of a healthy diet learners should identify food groups, quantities, preparation of food and fluid intake. In terms of sports specific requirements learners should identify energy demands, nutritional requirements pre, during and post training and nutritional requirements pre, during and post competition. Learners should also look at supplementation.

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UNIT 10: NUTRITION FOR SPORTS PERFORMANCE

Learners need to collect and collate information on their diet then describe the strengths and areas for improvement, in relation to sports performance and training. This lends itself to the production of a written report, which includes a food diary. Learners need to describe a personal nutritional strategy which has been developed with an advisor, either a tutor, coach or nutritionist. This must be suitable for the learner’s needs and goals and move the learner towards a better diet. The nutritional strategy should include food groups and quantities, rehydration and fluid intake, preparation of food, timing of food intake and supplementation. Learners also need to implement their personal nutritional strategy then review it describing its strengths and identifying areas for improvement. To achieve a merit grade learners need to explain the nutritional requirements of a selected sport. The requirements of a healthy diet and sports specific nutritional requirements both need to be covered. In terms of a healthy diet learners should explain food groups, quantities, preparation of food and fluid intake. In terms of sports specific requirements learners should explain energy demands, nutritional requirements pre, during and post training nutritional requirements pre, during and post competition. Learners should also look at supplementation. Learners need to explain the strengths of their current diet and make recommendations as to how it could be improved, in relation to sports performance and training. This may include eating more or less food, eating more or less of a particular food group, eating at different times, preparing food in a different way, drinking more fluid or drinking different types of fluid. Learners need to play a more active role in the design of a personal nutritional strategy, contributing a number of their own ideas. Evidence of this could be provided in the form of notes from a discussion with a coach/tutor/nutritionist and/or a tape recording. Learners also need to review their personal nutritional strategy, explaining the strengths and making recommendations as to how it could be improved. To achieve a distinction grade learners need to evaluate the nutritional requirements of a selected sport describing suitable meal plans for different meal. Learners need to justify the recommendations made regarding improving their diet, in relation to sports performance and training. Reasons for recommending the inclusion of certain quantities of foods from different food groups, types of food preparation, timing of food intake, energy intake, type and amount of fluid intake and nutritional supplements should be given. Learners also need to justify the recommendations made regarding improving their personal nutritional strategy. This may include why it fits in better with their likes, dislikes and lifestyle and how it is likely to improve training and competition performance. Links to National Occupational Standards, other BTEC units, other BTEC qualifications and other relevant units and qualifications This unit has links with Unit 1: The Body in Sport, Unit 8: Technical Skills and Tactical Awareness for Sport, Unit 9: Psychology for Sports Performance, Unit 11: Fitness for Sports Performance and Unit 12: Lifestyle and Sports Performance. This unit has links to Edexcel GCSE Physical Education and offers progression to the Edexcel Level 3 BTEC Nationals in Sport and Sport and Exercise Sciences. This unit has links to the National Occupational Standards in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance at Level 3, particularly Unit ES2: Plan and develop your own physical conditioning. This unit provides learners with the opportunity to provide evidence for key skills in communication, application of number, information and communication technology, improving own learning and performance and problem solving.

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Indicative reading for learners Materials that illustrate the level of learning required and that are particularly relevant. Tutors should be aware that textbooks are frequently updated and that they should use the latest editions where available. Examples currently include: Bean A — Complete Guide to Sports Nutrition (A & C Black Publishers Limited, 1996) Bean A — Fitness on a Plate (A & C Black Publishers Limited, 2003) Clarke N — Sports Nutrition Guidebook (Human Kinetics, 1996) Stear S — Fuelling Fitness for Sports Performance: Sports Nutrition Guide (The Sugar Bureau, 2004)

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UNIT 10: NUTRITION FOR SPORTS PERFORMANCE

Key skills

Achievement of key skills is not a requirement of this qualification but it is encouraged. Suggestions of opportunities for the generation of level 2 key skill evidence are given here. Staff should check that learners have produced all the evidence required by part B of the key skills specifications when assessing this evidence. Learners may need to develop additional evidence elsewhere to fully meet the requirements of the key skills specifications.

Application of Number level 2 When learners are: • • recording and assessing their current diet They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: N2.1 Interpret information from a suitable source. Use your information to carry out calculations to do with: a b c d • N2.3 recording and assessing their current diet, identifying strengths and areas for improvement. amounts or sizes scales or proportion handling statistics using formulae.

N2.2 recording and assessing their current diet, identifying strengths and areas for improvement

Interpret the results of your calculations and present your findings.

Communication level 2 When learners are: • discussing the energy demands and nutritional requirements of their sport • researching the energy demands and nutritional requirements of their sport • describing the strengths of their current diet and areas for improvement. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: C2.1a Take part in a group discussion

C2.1b C2.2

Give a talk of at least four minutes Read and summarise information from at least two documents about the same subject. Each document must be a minimum of 500 words long.

C2.3

Write two different types of documents each one giving different information. One document must be at least 500 words long.

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Information and communication technology level 2 When learners are: • identifying the energy demands and nutritional requirements of their sport and assessing their current diet identifying the energy demands and nutritional requirements of their sport, assessing their current diet and presenting the findings. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: ICT2.1 Search for and select information to meet your needs. Use different information sources for each task and multiple search criteria in at least one case. ICT2.2 Enter and develop the information to suit the task and derive new information. ICT2.3 Present combined information such as text with image, text with number, image with number.



Improving own learning and performance level 2 When learners are: • discussing and agreeing a personal nutritional strategy with their coach/tutor discussing, agreeing and implementing their personal nutritional strategy with support from their coach/tutor reviewing the strengths of their personal nutritional strategy and areas for improvement. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: LP2.1 Help set targets with an appropriate person and plan how these will be met. Take responsibility for some decisions about your learning, using your plan to help meet targets and improve your performance. Review progress with an appropriate person and provide evidence of your achievements.



LP2.2



LP2.3

Problem solving level 2 When learners are: • discussing and agreeing a personal nutritional strategy with their coach/tutor discussing, agreeing and implementing their personal nutritional strategy with support from their coach/tutor reviewing the strengths of their personal nutritional strategy and areas for improvement. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: PS2.1 Identify a problem, with help from an appropriate person, and identify different ways of tackling it. Plan and try out at least one way of solving the problem.



PS2.2



PS2.3

Check if the problem has been solved and identify ways to improve problem solving skills.

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UNIT 11: FITNESS FOR SPORTS PERFORMANCE

Unit 11:
NQF Level 2:

Fitness for Sports Performance
BTEC First

Guided learning hours: 60

Unit abstract
Many individuals who take part in sport have the aim of improving their performance. Fitness is vital to achieving excellence in sport. Successful athletes develop and maintain high levels of physical fitness and take fitness training very seriously. Fitness testing can play a valuable role in the development of physical fitness by helping to predict performance potential, identifying strengths and weaknesses and providing feedback on a training programme. In this learners will work with experienced and proficient coaching staff and other experts, such as personal trainers. The aim of the unit is to give learners the skills and knowledge to work with specialist staff to collect information and to plan, implement and evaluate a fitness training programme specific to their sporting goals. The first part of the unit looks at the physical requirements for excellence in a selected sport. Learners are required to collect and study information on elite athletes. Learners then compare their own level of fitness and potential with the demand of competing at their desired level. This will involve carrying out personal fitness assessments and assessing personal performance. The second part of the unit involves learners working with specialist staff to plan, implement and evaluate a personal fitness programme. Learners will be required to set personal fitness goals, plan a suitable programme covering six-weeks, implement the programme and evaluate the programme making modifications where necessary.

Learning outcomes
On completion of this unit a learner should: 1 2 3 4 Understand the fitness requirements necessary to achieve excellence in a selected sport Be able to assess their own level of fitness Be able to plan a personal fitness training programme Be able to implement and evaluate a personal fitness training programme.

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UNIT 11: FITNESS FOR SPORTS PERFORMANCE

Unit content

1

Understand the fitness requirements necessary to achieve excellence in a selected sport Components of fitness: physical fitness (aerobic endurance, muscular endurance, flexibility, speed, strength, power, body composition); skill related fitness (speed, agility, balance, coordination, power, reaction time) Information: eg live training and competition, recorded training and competition, books, journals, reports Excellence: typical fitness levels/requirements of regional, national, international and professional performers

2

Be able to assess their own level of fitness Fitness tests: eg flexibility (sit and reach), strength (one-repetition maximum — 1RM), grip dynamometer), aerobic endurance (multistage fitness test, 1.5 mile run test), speed (40m sprint), power (vertical jump), muscular endurance (one minute press-up, one minute sit-up), body composition (skinfolds, bioelectrical impedance) Administration of tests: pre-test procedures (informed consent); test protocols; selection of tests; reliability, validity and practicality of tests; test sequence; recording test results; interpretation of results; use of equipment (calibration) Assess: compare personal fitness test results and performance with levels required for excellence

3

Be able to plan a personal fitness training programme Goal setting: short-term, medium-term and long-term; importance of goal setting Information: eg personal goals, lifestyle, medical history, physical activity history, dietary history, dietary preferences, supplement use, nutritional knowledge, attitudes and motivation Physical fitness training programme: principles of training (frequency, intensity, time, type, overload, specificity, progression, individual differences, variation, reversibility); methods eg flexibility (static stretching, ballistic stretching, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation — PNF — stretching), strength, muscular endurance and power (resistance machines, circuit training, free weights, plyometrics), aerobic endurance (continuous training, fartlek training, interval training), speed training (interval training, fartlek training)

4

Be able to implement and evaluate a personal fitness training programme Implement: eg take part in planned sessions, perform to best of ability, gain agreement for any missed sessions, importance of commitment Training diaries: log of performance and achievement; programme progression, motivation for training Review: during and post implementation; modify programme to achieve planned goals

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UNIT 11: FITNESS FOR SPORTS PERFORMANCE

Grading grid

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all of the learning outcomes for the unit. The criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit.

Grading criteria To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to: M1 M2 D2 explain their personal level of fitness, identifying strengths and areas for improvement contribute own ideas to the design of a sixweek personal fitness training programme explain the strengths of the personal fitness training programme, making suggestions for improvement. explain the fitness requirements for achieving excellence in a selected sport D1 To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to: evaluate their personal level of fitness, considering the level required to achieve excellence in a selected sport justify suggestions related to identified areas for improvement in the personal fitness training programme.

To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

P1

describe the fitness requirements for achieving excellence in a selected sport

P2

describe their personal level of fitness, by administering four different tests for different components of fitness M3 M4

P3

plan, and agree, a six-week personal fitness training programme with a coach

P4

implement a six-week personal fitness training programme, maintaining a training diary

P5

describe the strengths of the personal fitness training programme and identify areas for improvement.

Guidance to support the assessment of this unit is available on page 90.

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Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery Successful delivery of this unit requires the tutor, learner and learner’s coach or training advisor to work closely together. The unit should be introduced with the tutor identifying the components of physical fitness and the components of skill-related fitness. Learners need to understand the fitness requirements for excellence in a selected sport. In order to do this they will draw on a wide range of information including books, journals, videos of matches, match observations, observation of training sessions and reports. This lends itself to individual or group research. Case studies of high level performers can be used. Learners need to look at the typical levels of fitness required for club level performers up to international level performers. The unit has a large practical component and learners are required to assess their own level of physical fitness. Prior to doing this they need to understand the theory behind fitness assessments including the range of tests available and the protocols, reliability, practicality, validity and administration of tests. Learners should also be encouraged to carry out fitness tests on others. Learners need to be aware of normative data, if possible from athletes of different abilities. Assessment of personal fitness can also be carried out subjectively by observation of performance and comparison with elite athletes. Learners need to work with a coach/advisor to plan a personal fitness training programme. Prior to planning the physical fitness programme learners should cover the theory behind fitness training programme design. The different methods of training should be identified and, where possible, experienced practically. Learners also need to understand the principles of training and periodisation. The importance of setting SMART goals needs to be covered and examples of suitable goals provided. The final part of this unit requires learners to implement and evaluate their personal fitness training programme. Learners should be introduced to the benefits of keeping training diaries and the information that should be recorded. The evaluation of the training programme should be carried out with the coach/advisor. Skills in evaluating a fitness training programme can be developed using case studies. Assessment To achieve a pass grade learners need to describe the fitness requirements for achieving excellence in a selected sport. Evidence can be in the form of a written report and/or presentation. They need to describe both the components of physical fitness and the components of skill-related fitness. Learners also need to describe their personal level of physical fitness. This should include fitness assessment results and also include information gained from watching videos of performance, coach feedback etc. A written report would provide suitable evidence. Learners need to describe a personal fitness training programme developed and agreed with a coach or tutor. The programme must cover a period of at least six weeks and be suitable to the learner’s needs and goals. The programme should also apply the principles of training and periodisation. Suitable methods of training should be selected. Learners need to undertake a personal fitness training programme. Evidence of this could be in the form of a training diary which identifies the training carried out, and records the date and details of the session.

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Learners also need to review their training programme, describing the strengths and identifying areas for improvement. A written report or recorded discussion with their tutor/coach would provide suitable evidence. To achieve a merit grade learners need to explain the fitness requirements for achieving excellence in a selected sport. Learners need to explain their personal level of physical fitness, including fitness assessment results and also information gained from watching videos of performance, coach feedback etc. Learners need to play a more active role in the design of a personal fitness training programme, contributing a number of their own ideas. Evidence of this could be in the form of written notes of a discussion with a coach/tutor and/or a tape recording. The programme must cover a period of at least six weeks and be suitable to the learner’s needs and goals. The programme should also apply the principles of training and periodisation. Suitable methods of training should be selected. Learners need to review their programme, recommending suggestions for improvement. To achieve a distinction grade learners need to evaluate their personal level of physical fitness, considering required for excellence at their desired level. This should include fitness assessment results with comparison to norms and also information gained from observation of their own performance compared to the performance of elite athletes. Learners also need to justify suggestions for improvement in their personal fitness training programme. This may include why frequency, intensity, time and type(s) of training have changed or why the structure of the training year has changed. Links to National Occupational Standards, other BTEC units, other BTEC qualifications and other relevant units and qualifications This unit has links with Unit 1: The Body in Sport, Unit 8: Technical Skills and Tactical Awareness for Sport, Unit 9: Psychology for Sports Performance, Unit 10: Nutrition for Sports Performance and Unit 12: Lifestyle and Sports Performance. This unit has links to Edexcel GCSE Physical Education, and offers progression to the Edexcel Level 3 BTEC Nationals in Sport and Sport and Exercise Sciences. This unit has links to the National Occupational Standards in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance at Level 3, particularly Unit ES2: Plan and develop your own physical conditioning. This unit provides learners with the opportunity to provide evidence for key skills in communication, application of number, information and communication technology, improving own learning and performance and problem solving. Essential resources Learners need access to fitness testing and training equipment and facilities.

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Indicative reading for learners Materials that illustrate the level of learning required and that are particularly relevant. Tutors should be aware that textbooks are frequently updated and that they should use the latest editions where available. Examples currently include: Ackland J — The Complete Guide to Endurance Training (A & C Black Publishers Limited, 1998) Dalgleish J et al — The Health & Fitness Handbook (Longman, 2001) Lawrence M — The Complete Guide to Core Stability (A & C Black Publishers Limited, 2003) Norris C — The Complete Guide to Stretching (A & C Black Publishers Limited, 1999) Sharkey B — Fitness and Health (Human Kinetics, 2001) Winch M — The Complete Guide to Strength Training (Crowood Press, 2004)

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UNIT 11: FITNESS FOR SPORTS PERFORMANCE

Key skills

Achievement of key skills is not a requirement of this qualification but it is encouraged. Suggestions of opportunities for the generation of level 2 key skill evidence are given here. Staff should check that learners have produced all the evidence required by part B of the key skills specifications when assessing this evidence. Learners may need to develop additional evidence elsewhere to fully meet the requirements of the key skills specifications.

Application of Number level 2 When learners are: • • carrying out fitness assessments carrying out the personal fitness programme They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: N2.1 N2.2 Interpret information from a suitable source. Use your information to carry out calculations to do with: a b c d • carrying out and reviewing the personal fitness programme. N2.3 amounts or sizes scales or proportion handling statistics using formulae.

Interpret the results of your calculations and present your findings.

Communication level 2 When learners are: • identifying the physical requirements for excellence in their sport describing the physical requirements for excellence in their sport identifying the physical requirements for excellence in their sport writing about the physical requirements for excellence in their sport. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: C2.1a Take part in a group discussion



C2.1b

Give a talk of at least four minutes



C2.2

Read and summarise information from at least two documents about the same subject. Each document must be a minimum of 500 words long.



C2.3

Write two different types of documents each one giving different information. One document must be at least 500 words long.

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Improving own learning and performance level 2 When learners are: • discussing and agreeing a personal fitness training programme with their coach/advisor discussing, agreeing and implementing their personal fitness training programme with support from their coach/advisor reviewing the strengths of their personal fitness training programme and areas for improvement. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: LP2.1 Help set targets with an appropriate person and plan how these will be met.



LP2.2

Take responsibility for some decisions about your learning, using your plan to help meet targets and improve your performance. Review progress with an appropriate person and provide evidence of your achievements.



LP2.3

Problem solving level 2 When learners are: • discussing and agreeing a personal fitness training programme with their coach/advisor discussing, agreeing and implementing their personal fitness training programme with support from their coach/advisor reviewing the strengths of their personal fitness training programme and areas for improvement. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: PS2.1 Identify a problem, with help from an appropriate person, and identify different ways of tackling it. Plan and try out at least one way of solving the problem.



PS2.2



PS2.3

Check if the problem has been solved and identify ways to improve problem solving skills.

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UNIT 12: LIFESTYLE AND SPORTS PERFORMANCE

Unit 12:
NQF Level 2:

Lifestyle and Sports Performance
BTEC First

Guided learning hours: 60

Unit abstract
Success in sport is not only about physical fitness, nutrition, technical, tactical and mental skills. It is also important that athletes are professional in all aspects of their life. The reputation and success of an athlete is dependent on them being reliable and spending their leisure time in a way that does not harm their ability to perform or bring themselves or their sport into disrepute. Good communication skills and the ability to work well with others will help an athlete develop their career as a sportsperson. To be successful, athletes need to be able to communicate and work well with a range of people, including coaching staff, managers, advisers and other athletes. Successful athletes also have to take part in media interviews. Individuals who want to perform at a high level in their sport need to set goals and plan how they are going achieve these goals. This involves career planning, financial planning and should also cover the possibility that an athlete may not make it as a professional. This unit gives learners the knowledge and skills to adopt a lifestyle appropriate to an elite athlete. It is aimed at individuals competing at a high level. The first part of the unit looks at time management. It involves learners planning and prioritising work commitments such as training, competition and other types of employment and education. It also involves learners making good use of their leisure time, ensuring that leisure activities do not interfere with performance. Pressure from peers, coach/support staff and family are investigated and strategies to cope with these pressures are discussed. Appropriate behaviour in a range of situations, including training, competition, at home and at social functions, is discussed. The second part of this unit looks at career management, communicating effectively and working with others. Financial management, first and second career choices are explored. Effective communication skills and working relationships are examined and put into practice. Media interviews are also planned and carried out.

Learning outcomes
On completion of this unit a learner should: 1 2 3 4 Be able to plan and manage their work commitments and leisure time Understand appropriate behaviour for an elite athlete Understand the factors that influence the effective planning of a career Be able to communicate effectively with the media and significant others.

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Unit content

1

Be able to plan and manage their work commitments and leisure time Work commitments: training, competition, study, other forms of employment, prioritising, informing others, flexibility, resources Leisure time: social life; inappropriate activities eg alcohol, drugs, smoking; appropriate leisure activities eg rest and recovery, golf, cinema; living away from home Pressures: people eg peers, family, coaching staff, teachers; pressures eg alcohol consumption, use of drugs, smoking, social life, level of performance in training and competition; dealing with pressure eg support network, group and one to one discussions, lifestyle changes, time planning Planning aids: eg diaries (paper, electronic), support staff (personal assistant, manager, coach)

2

Understand appropriate behaviour for an elite athlete Behaviour: eg adherence to rules, respect for peers and others (coaches, officials, spectators), acting as a role model, appropriate clothing, conduct and manners Situations: eg during training and competition, at home, social functions

3

Understand the factors that influence the effective planning of a career Goals: short term; medium term; long term Athletic career: eg current expectations as an elite athlete, key review dates, change of coach, change of club, contingencies for illness, accident and injury Second career: career options inside and outside professional sport eg coach, teacher, media, sports development, physiotherapist, sports science support; qualifications and experience Financial management: eg financial advice, income, expenditure, taxation, savings, investment, insurance, pension, legal and contractual requirements

4

Be able to communicate and work effectively with others Communication: eg active listening skills, asking questions, communicating (accurately and clearly), discussions (with coaching staff, managers, advisers and other athletes), extracting key points from written material, writing clearly and effectively Working with other people: working relationships eg coaching staff, managers, advisers, fellow athletes; reviewing and improving relationships Media: eg TV, radio, press, print media (local, national and international); requirements of different media Planning: eg purpose, anticipating likely questions, scripts and prompt sheets, rehearsals, appearance and presentation, sensitive issues, sources of help and advice Delivery: eg use of speech, pace, intonation, clarity, body language, confidence, use of equipment

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UNIT 12: LIFESTYLE AND SPORTS PERFORMANCE

Grading grid

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all of the learning outcomes for the unit. The criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit.

Grading criteria To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to: M1 D1 D2 D3 M2 explain three different pressures on elite athletes and describe suitable strategies that can be used to deal with these pressures explain appropriate behaviour for elite athletes in three different situations explain goals, in personal athletic career plan, and second career choices explain the skills required to communicate and work effectively with others explain their strengths and areas for improvement when participating in a media interview. explain the way work commitments and leisure activities have been planned To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to: evaluate the effects and consequences of the behaviour of elite athletes justify goals, in personal career plan, and second career choices present recommendations on how to improve their media interview skills.

To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

P1

produce a realistic plan for work commitments and leisure time, for one month

P2

describe three different pressures on elite athletes and identify strategies that can be used to deal with these pressures M3 M4 M5 M6

P3

describe appropriate behaviour for elite athletes in three different situations

P4

describe realistic goals in a personal athletic career plan, including second career choices

P5

describe three financial issues elite athletes need to consider

P6

describe the skills required to communicate and work effectively with others

P7

plan for, and be the subject of, a media interview, describing own strengths and areas for improvement.

Guidance to support the assessment of this unit is available on page 98.

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Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery Learners need to understand how to plan their work commitments and leisure activities. Appropriate and inappropriate leisure activities should be identified and discussed. Types of work commitment should also be discussed as well as the importance of prioritising these. Learners should be introduced to a range of paper-based and electronic planning tools. They should also be encouraged to identify the types of pressure that elite athletes face from different people and strategies that can be employed to deal with these pressures. This can be done through group discussion. It is important that learners understand appropriate behaviour for elite athletes. This is best approached by looking at case studies, identifying why certain behaviour is appropriate or inappropriate and discussing the implications of behaving in a particular way. A range of situations should be covered, including during training and competition, at home and at social functions. It will not always be possible to use case studies, and in this situation discussion should take place. Career planning needs to cover short-term and long-term career and financial planning. Short term career planning will primarily involve the athlete’s competitive career but contingency plans should be made for illnesses and injury. Case studies of successful athletes would provide a useful tool for learners. Long term career planning will involve the athlete’s career outside competitive sport and learners need to understand the qualifications/experience they need to pursue their chosen career. SkillsActive and Connexions have a range of information on careers in sport which learners can access. Job advertisements, job descriptions and person specifications can also be examined. Financial planning is important for any athlete and learners should be introduced to potential sources of income, tax issues, savings and investment, insurance, pension provision, legal and contractual requirements and sources of financial advice. Communication and working relationships are also important for any athlete. Learners should develop their written and oral communication skills. The ability to work effectively with others should be developed through role play situations. Learners need to understand the different media available. The specific requirements for communicating with the media need to be covered, both the need to plan for media interviews and how to deliver an effective media interview. Examples of elite athletes giving media interviews could be used to provide examples of effective and ineffective media interview skills. Learners can develop their skills through role play situations. Assessment To achieve a pass grade learners need to realistically plan their work commitments and leisure time. A paper-based or electronic diary would provide suitable evidence. All work commitments, including training, competition, study and other forms of employment, should be included. These need to be prioritised where appropriate. Leisure time also needs to be planned and suitable leisure activities identified. Learners need to describe the pressures on elite athletes from a range of people, including peers, family, coaching staff and teachers, and then identify strategies that can be used to deal with these pressures. They also need to identify appropriate behaviour for elite athletes, such as adhering to the rules, respect for peers and others, acting as a role model, appropriate clothing,

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appropriate conduct, appropriate manners and appropriate mannerisms in a range of different situations including during training and competition, at home and at social functions. A written report or presentation would provide suitable evidence for both these criteria. Learners need to identify realistic short-, medium- and long-term goals in a personal career plan, including second career choices. They also need to describe financial issues elite athletes need to consider including income, expenditure, taxation, savings and investment, insurance, pension contributions, legal and contractual requirements and sources of financial advice, where appropriate. Learners need to describe the skills required to communicate and work effectively with others and plan and participate in a media interview. A videoed role play exercise would provide evidence of carrying out a media interview. Written notes or records of a discussion with their tutor would also provide suitable evidence. To achieve a merit grade learners need to explain the way work commitments and leisure activities have been planned. In addition to a paper-based or electronic diary, supplementary notes explaining the planning process could be produced. Learners need to explain the pressures on elite athletes and explain the strategies that can be used to deal with these pressures. They also need to describe appropriate behaviour for elite athletes in a range of situations. Learners need to describe the short, medium and long-term goals and second career choices identified in the personal career plan. They need to explain the skills required to communicate and work effectively with others and after participating in a media interview explain their strengths and areas for improvement. To achieve a distinction grade learners need to evaluate the effects and consequences of the behaviour of elite athletes. Examples could come from any sport. They need to justify short, medium and long-term goals and second career choices in their personal career plan. Reasons need to be given for goals and career choices made. Learners also need to present recommendations on how to improve their media interview skills. Links to National Occupational Standards, other BTEC units, other BTEC qualifications and other relevant units/qualifications This unit has links with Unit 1: The Body in Sport, Unit 8: Technical Skills and Tactical Awareness for Sport, Unit 9: Psychology for Sports Performance, Unit 10: Nutrition for Sports Performance and Unit 11: Fitness for Sports Performance. This unit provides a progression route to the Edexcel Level 3 BTEC Nationals in Sport and Sport and Exercise Sciences. This unit has links to the National Occupational Standards in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance at Level 3, particularly Units ES5: Manage own lifestyle, ES6: Manage own career and ES7: Communication and work effectively with others. This unit provides learners with the opportunity to provide evidence for the key skill in communication.

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Indicative reading for learners Materials that illustrate the level of learning required and that are particularly relevant. Tutors should be aware that textbooks are frequently updated and that they should use the latest editions where available. Examples currently include: Fyfe L — Careers in Sport (Kogan Page, 1998) Scott A — GCSE PE for Edexcel (Heinemann, 2001) Stafford I and Balyi I — Long Term Athlete Development — Preparing for a Life in Sport (Coachwise, 2004)

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UNIT 12: LIFESTYLE AND SPORTS PERFORMANCE

Key skills

Achievement of key skills is not a requirement of this qualification but it is encouraged. Suggestions of opportunities for the generation of level 2 key skill evidence are given here. Staff should check that learners have produced all the evidence required by part B of the key skills specifications when assessing this evidence. Learners may need to develop additional evidence elsewhere to fully meet the requirements of the key skills specifications.

Communication level 2 When learners are: • discussing pressures on elite athletes and strategies to deal with these pressures describing appropriate behaviour for an elite athlete in a range of situations researching appropriate behaviour for an elite athlete in a range of situations writing about pressures on elite athletes and strategies to deal with these pressures. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: C2.1a Take part in a group discussion



C2.1b

Give a talk of at least four minutes



C2.2

Read and summarise information from at least two documents about the same subject. Each document must be a minimum of 500 words long.



C2.3

Write two different types of documents each one giving different information. One document must be at least 500 words long.

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UNIT 13: WORK-BASED PROJECT IN SPORT

Unit 13:
NQF Level 2:

Work-based Project in Sport
BTEC First

Guided learning hours: 60

Unit abstract
It is very important for learners to have first-hand occupational experience of the sports industry if they are to develop into well-informed and experienced potential employees. This unit provides learners with the opportunity to develop their knowledge and experience first-hand, within a truly vocational environment. Learners will gain experience in the process of applying for, and ultimately gaining, a work-based placement in the sports sector. The broad range of possibilities that are open to the learner in this rapidly expanding aspect of the economy are explored and reviewed. Learners will review the range of jobs available locally in the sports industry. Learners will also have the opportunity to specifically review the requirements of particular roles within the sports industry, leading to a greater level of understanding of the entry requirements for employment in the sports industry. This unit allows learners to plan for, and complete, a practical work-based experience within the sports industry. It is expected that learners will spend approximately 10 days in a work-based experience in sport. Learners will have the opportunity to prepare and develop their interview skills as well as other work related documentation. This is an ideal opportunity to prepare learners for future careers within the sports industry. During the experience, learners must complete a project that focuses on any area of sport but must be creative, innovative or based on problem solving. The project should have outcomes that are useful for the learner, their centre and the experience provider. Learners will be required to present the findings of their project, offering an opportunity for evaluation and reflection upon the work-based experience in the sports sector.

Learning outcomes
On completion of this unit a learner should: 1 2 3 4 Know about the range and scope of organisations and occupations within the sports industry Be able to use relevant documents and skills relating to sport-based work experience Be able to plan and carry out a project during sport-based work experience Be able to present and review the project.

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Unit content

1 Know about the range and scope of organisations and occupations within the sports industry Organisations: providers (public, private, voluntary, joint and dual use); funding Occupations; responsibilities involved in, and skills required for different occupations: eg sports assistant, fitness instructor, coach, teacher, sports development officer, sports and exercise scientist, professional performer, injury treatment, retailer 2 Be able to use relevant documents and skills relating to a sport-based work experience Sources of jobs available: eg Institute of Leisure and Amenity Management (ILAM), press, publications and periodicals, SkillsActive, recruitment agencies and websites Experience: eg placement, part-time employment, full-time employment Personal information: eg application forms, letters (application, acceptance, decline, confirmation, appropriate content and format), use of ICT, CV Preparation for interview: eg dress, appearance, attitude, interview procedures, application procedures, confirmation, planning Interview skills: eg body language, personal skills, communication skills, relating to others, questioning, listening, answering 3 Be able to plan and carry out a project during sport-based work experience Planning: aims; objectives; proposed outcomes; arrangements eg transport, accommodation; requirements eg clothing, equipment Themes: eg marketing, recruiting, customer service, customer footfall, staff training, participation rates, health and safety procedures. Information on experience provider: eg type of organisation, sector, facilities and equipment, funding, target market Occupation information: eg qualifications, personal skills, roles and responsibilities. Aims, objectives and outcomes: related to specific area eg coaching and training, acquiring skills, customer care, health and safety, equipment Regulations: eg Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, Office Shops and Railways Premises Act 1963, The Health and Safety (Young Persons) Regulations 1997 Skills: developed and to be developed eg practical, technical, people related, personal

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UNIT 13: WORK-BASED PROJECT IN SPORT

4

Be able to present and review the project Monitor and review: formative and summative; strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats; skills and knowledge eg acquired and developed, use and transferability; benefits eg to self and centre; career development eg plans; progression opportunities; monitor eg personal achievements against aims, objectives, targets, methods of monitoring performance (interviews, task sheets, witness testimony, video, audio); activities undertaken Presentation: eg oral, written, use of ICT, graphics, data Benefits to self: eg knowledge and skills, techniques, progression opportunities Benefits to centre: eg new materials, case study materials, further work placements Benefits to experience provider: eg recruitment opportunities; development of training and induction processes

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UNIT 13: WORK-BASED PROJECT IN SPORT

Grading grid

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all of the learning outcomes for the unit. The criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit.

Grading criteria To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to: M1 D1 M2 D2 use sources of advertisements for jobs available in sport to identify an appropriate work-based experience in sport relate own personal skills and qualities, to those required for an occupation in sport, identifying areas for improvement present the project, explaining the benefits and making recommendations for improvement. explain the skills required for three different occupations within the sports industry To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to:

To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

P1

describe three different types of organisations within the sports industry, giving examples

P2

describe three different occupations within the sports industry, and the skills that each require M3

evaluate own personal skills and qualities in relation to those required for an occupation in sport, and suggest ways to improve own skills and qualities present the project, evaluating the benefits and justifying recommendations relating to identified areas for improvement.

P3

identify sources of advertisements for jobs available within the sports industry, and provide three different examples of advertisements M4

P4

produce an application for a work-based experience in sport, describing personal skills and qualities in documentation prepared

P5

prepare for an interview for work-based experience in sport

P6

undertake an interview for work-based experience in sport

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Grading criteria To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to: To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to:

To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

P7

plan a project, listing realistic objectives, proposed outcomes and timescale, to be related to, and carried out in, work-based experience in sport

P8

undertake a project in a work-based experience in sport

P9

present the project, describing the benefits and identifying areas for improvement.

Guidance to support the assessment of this unit is available on page 108.

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Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery In supporting and guiding learners, tutors should take into account the expressed future career plans of learners as well as their educational needs. It is expected that course teams will work in an integrated way to support learners in the process of securing a work based experience within an organisation in the sports industry. Securing a work-based experience requires the development of important skills such as completing a range of application forms, preparing a CV and covering letter. Learners, wherever possible, should be encouraged to use actual application forms which can be obtained from local employers. The careers advisory service may also be a useful source of information and advice. Learners could gain the appropriate work-based experience from a centre derived placement, part- or full-time employment. Learners should be taught the importance of the type of information included within a CV and an application form, as well as the need for neatness of presentation and the use of the correct format. The use of simulated interviews will help to develop interview skills and will also add to learner confidence. The opportunities offered by the placement should clearly match the audit of learner skills, abilities and career aspirations. The use of employers to support role play will enhance learners’ skills and confidence, while the use of video equipment to review personal, social and communication skills will help learners identify where improvements or further practice are needed. Learners will need an appropriate level of support to identify, undertake and evaluate the work based project, so that they can acquire a deeper and broader knowledge and understanding of the world of work and use the opportunity to develop their own skills and knowledge within sport and leisure. Learners may wish to use achievement of this unit to develop certain key skills but guidance will have to be given on how additional learning or assessment opportunities may be achieved. Assessment The outcomes from this unit should be achieved through learners’ own experience of the world of work. For this unit learners would normally spend approximately 10 days working in a specific vocational area in the sports industry, but learners may also volunteer to spend more time, possibly using holiday periods, to maximise the opportunities available to them. Part-time working is also acceptable when generating evidence. The activities suggested to generate evidence for this unit require an active approach, using an imaginative collection of resource materials and providing a wide range of information about different opportunities so that an informed choice can be made. When learners are reviewing the range of occupations available to them it is expected that they will review at least four areas of potential employment. Evidence is likely to include accurately completed forms and observations of the demonstration of interview skills. It may also take the form of records/reports from interviews and the results of interviews. Learners should complete a rigorous interview process to ensure that they meet the requirements of the work experience provider. Learners should also be able to identify their own personal and career development needs.

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Evidence should be achieved through learners’ own work-based experience, with learners being encouraged to collect evidence in the style of a portfolio which could include placement logs, diaries, personal accounts and observation outcomes, including witness style testimonies. Evidence for the presentation of the project should be based on learners’ observations, reflective accounts and experience gained during the work-based experience. Links to National Occupational Standards, other BTEC units, other BTEC qualifications and other relevant units and qualifications This unit has links with Unit 2: Health, Safety and Injury in Sport, Unit 5: Planning and Leading Sports Activities, Unit 14: Instructing Exercise and Fitness, Unit 15: Sport and Leisure Facility Operations and Unit 16: Leading Outdoor and Adventurous Activities. This unit provides a progression route from the Edexcel Level 1 BTEC Introductory Certificate and Diploma in Sport and Leisure, and progression to the Edexcel Level 3 BTEC Nationals in Sport and Sport and Exercise Sciences. This unit has links to the National Occupational Standards in Activity Leadership, Coaching, Teaching and Instructing and Operational Services at Level 2. This unit provides learners with the opportunity to provide evidence for key skills in communication, information and communication technology, improving own learning and performance, problem solving and working with others. Essential resources Learners should be able to access sources of relevant and required information such as trade journals, local newspapers and local radio. Examples of documentation, such as application forms, and details regarding recruitment procedures should also be made available. Visits from personnel from potential placements would be helpful and add realism to the recruitment process. Tutors’ time must be available to visit learners during the work-based experience. Appropriate resources for the development and presentation of the project, such as ICT facilities, visual display materials and equipment should be available for learners to use, with an appropriate level of technical support. Indicative reading for learners Materials that illustrate the level of learning required and that are particularly relevant. Tutors should be aware that textbooks are frequently updated and that they should use the latest editions where available. Examples currently include: Harris B et al — BTEC First Sport: Student Book (Heinemann, 2004) Honeybourne J — BTEC First in Sport (Nelson Thornes, 2005) Journals which may support the delivery of this unit include: Leisure Manager Leisure Opportunities Leisure Week

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Key skills

Achievement of key skills is not a requirement of this qualification but it is encouraged. Suggestions of opportunities for the generation of level 2 key skill evidence are given here. Staff should check that learners have produced all the evidence required by part B of the key skills specifications when assessing this evidence. Learners may need to develop additional evidence elsewhere to fully meet the requirements of the key skills specifications.

Communication level 2 When learners are: • investigating the range of occupations available and the associated responsibilities of these occupations presenting their work-based project They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: C2.1a Take part in a group discussion

• •

C2.1b

Give a talk of at least four minutes Read and summarise information from at least two documents about the same subject. Each document must be a minimum of 500 words long. Write two different types of documents each one giving different information. One document must be at least 500 words long.

C2.2 identifying sources of advertisements for jobs and work placements producing their work-based project. C2.3



Information and communication technology level 2 When learners are: • They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence:

ICT2.1 Search for and select information to meet your identifying sources of needs. advertisements for jobs and work placements Use different information sources for each task and multiple search criteria in at least one case. assimilating data for the project and using the data to draw conclusions presenting their work-based project. ICT2.2 Enter and develop the information to suit the task and derive new information. ICT2.3 Present combined information such as text with image, text with number, image with number.





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Improving own learning and performance level 2 When learners are: • • completing the work based project deciding upon the focus of, and completing, their work-based project reviewing the project with their tutor or work experience provider. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: LP2.1 LP2.2 Help set targets with an appropriate person and plan how these will be met. Take responsibility for some decisions about your learning, using your plan to help meet targets and improve your performance. Review progress with an appropriate person and provide evidence of your achievements.



LP2.3

Problem solving level 2 When learners are: • applying for work experience placements creating interview strategies evaluating performance after the interview. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: PS2.1 Identify a problem, with help from an appropriate person, and identify different ways of tackling it. Plan and try out at least one way of solving the problem. Check if the problem has been solved and identify ways to improve problem solving skills.

• •

PS2.2 PS2.3

Working with others level 2 When learners are: • completing work experience tasks They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: WO2.1 Plan work with others. WO2.2 Work co-operatively towards achieving the identified objectives. • reviewing progress during their work experience placement. WO2.3 Review your contribution and agree ways to improve work with others.

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UNIT 14: INSTRUCTING EXERCISE AND FITNESS

Unit 14:
NQF Level 2:

Instructing Exercise and Fitness
BTEC First

Guided learning hours: 60

Unit abstract
The exercise and fitness industry remains a growth industry and is backed by many government initiatives in order to improve the health of the nation. Consequently, there is a constant need for qualified fitness instructors to train and educate people. In order to succeed in exercise and fitness instruction it is imperative that learners understand the principles behind exercise programmes and have gained the relevant knowledge and practical skills in exercise and fitness instruction. Exercise and fitness instructors must also have excellent communication skills as these are crucial when dealing with the public in order to help build good relationships. Any person undertaking this qualification will most likely work in the sport and leisure industry for a period of time, whether it is purely for work experience, part-time employment or to pursue a career in the industry. In order to do this successfully, this unit prepares the learner for dealing with the public by giving them a good grounding in how to assist in teaching exercise and fitness. This unit covers all key aspects required to successfully plan and evaluate a range of exercise programmes and also to competently assist in delivering exercise sessions to a range of clients. As a starting point, the principles behind the delivery of an effective exercise session will be studied, including the basic principles of training and health and safety issues. This is then followed by the planning of an exercise session which covers the aims of the session and ways of determining activity selection. The learner is then required to assist in instructing a variety of exercise sessions. The unit closes with methods of evaluating the exercise session and exercise programmes in order for the learner to determine both their personal development needs as a coach and the fitness progression of their clients.

Learning outcomes
On completion of this unit a learner should: 1 2 3 4 Understand the principles of an effective exercise session and exercise programming Be able to plan an exercise programme Be able to assist in instructing an exercise session Be able to undertake a review of an exercise programme and an exercise session.

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Unit content

1

Understand the principles of an effective exercise session and exercise programming Principles of fitness training: frequency; intensity; time; type; progression; overload; specificity; reversibility; over training Health and safety for clients: Exercise and Fitness Code of Ethical Practice; informed consent; medical and activity history; induction; importance of technique; stability and alignment of joints; momentum; correct attire eg clothing and footwear Warm up: functions of the warm up; structure of the warm up eg mobility section, pulse raising section, static stretching Cool down: functions of the cool down; structure of cool down eg pulse lowering section, static stretching, developmental stretching

2

Be able to plan an exercise programme Factors to consider: assess levels of activity and lifestyle (appropriate screening); address areas required for development of fitness and health; aims (specific to client goals) Clients: eg individuals, groups, people with low fitness levels, people with particular needs, experienced and inexperienced clients Activity selection: eg activities that can easily fit into client’s routine (walking to work), client’s enjoyment, client’s goals, weather conditions, cost, availability, transport, culture

3

Be able to assist in instructing an exercise session Start of the session: eg setting up and checking the equipment, communication and relationship with clients, new clients (identification and screening), advise clients of facility emergency procedures, explanations of planned activities and demonstrations, warm up, monitor clients to ensure exercising safely, methods of motivation (appropriate words of encouragement) During the session: eg methods of voice projection, monitoring clients, correcting clients technique, instructors response to problems, adapting exercises eg different ability levels Ending the session: eg cool down appropriate to clients fitness levels, opportunity for client to ask questions, feedback to clients on the session, departure of clients, check equipment used and put away

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4

Be able to undertake a review of an exercise programme and an exercise session Purpose: eg motivation, track fitness progression Review: eg feedback from clients with regard to outcomes and goals, effectiveness of planned activities, management of session (health and safety issues, welfare of clients eg ensuring clients drink water during the session), methods of improving session, documentation of review Modify: eg future planning to ensure adherence; changing activities to maintain interest and ensure fitness progression Development needs: personal coaching plan; targets eg specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, time-bound (SMART); development opportunities eg specific training and courses

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Grading grid

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all of the learning outcomes for the unit. The criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit.

Grading criteria To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to: M1 M2 D2 M3 M4 M5 demonstrate effective communication with selected clients competently use different forms of feedback in order to review three different exercise programmes and exercise sessions justify identified personal development needs. produce detailed exercise programmes for three different types of clients D3 justify each part of the warm up and cool down explain the principles of fitness training D1 To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to: relate the principles of fitness training to a range of clients with different needs plan exercise programmes justifying, the aims and range of activities suggested for three different types of clients demonstrate competence in monitoring and adapting exercises to suit different client ability levels.

To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

P1

describe the principles of fitness training

P2

outline health and safety issues an exercise instructor needs to consider for their clients.

P3

describe and instruct a warm up and a cool down

P4

outline exercise programmes for three different types of clients

P5

assist in instructing induction, resistance training, cardiovascular training and circuit training sessions for selected clients M6

P6

use appropriate feedback to review three different exercise programmes and exercise sessions

P7

review performance in the outlining of exercise programmes and in the instruction, and assisting the instruction, of exercise sessions, identifying strengths and personal development needs.

Guidance to support the assessment of this unit is available on page 117.
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Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery This unit is designed to enable the learner to develop all the skills necessary to assist in improving a range of clients’ fitness levels. They will learn how to design an effective exercise session and exercise programme, assist in instructing an exercise session and review an exercise session and programme. Although there is some theoretical work required to ensure learners understand the principles of training and health and safety issues etc, it is imperative that this unit is taught in a practical manner so that the learners can gain confidence in dealing with people. The principles of training can be taught in both a theoretical and practical manner. The basic principles must be taught, and this could be complemented with learners undertaking a basic fitness programme, designed by them, to improve one area of fitness. In terms of the health and safety of clients, learners must understand the Exercise and Fitness Code of Ethical Practice and be able to implement the code. In a practical session, they may then be shown the importance of technique in lifting weights. Stability and the correct alignment of joints must be demonstrated in a range of situations including posture, lifting weights, sit ups etc. Learners may then take part in a variety of warm ups and cool downs, which could include exercise to music, resistance training and gym cardiac equipment. However, each warm-up and cool down must have the same basic components and learners need to be aware of the functions of each. Learners need to be made aware of different types of Pre Activity Readiness Questionnaires (PAR-Q) and how to analyse these questionnaires. They will also need to be taught how to assess the activity levels and lifestyles of individuals and determine which activities would be suitable for them. This requires the learners to ask personal probing questions so they will need to develop good interpersonal skills. To practise it would be a good idea for learners to canvass family and friends. Implementing an exercise session is practical and for this learners need to take part in a range of exercise sessions. They may then lead small sections of an exercise session and be given detailed feedback on their strengths and areas for improvement. Eventually, every learner should have led every part of an exercise session. Learners are required to review and adapt the exercise programmes and exercise sessions. They can have a discussion with their clients and determine how effective their exercise session and exercise programmes are. Questionnaires could be devised by the learner with tutor support in order to ensure all the pertinent issues are addressed. The learner must also be able to assess their own personal development needs. The tutor may help the learner with this development plan by giving them a list of relevant qualifications, and descriptions of the qualifications, from which they may determine the most suitable for their needs. Assessment The learner’s knowledge of the principles of training can be assessed through a written task. The health and safety issues can be assessed through practical analysis of the learner carrying out health and safety checks on their clients during an exercise session. The warm up and cool down must be practically assessed, the learner may explain each part of the warm up and cool down to their clients whilst instructing or through a viva at the end of the session or through written work.

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To show they are able to plan an exercise programme, learners could analyse their questionnaires and assess the readiness of these people to take part in activity. They could then devise an exercise programme for a range of people ensuring that the activities chosen are appropriate. The learner’s ability to plan and implement an exercise session can be assessed through observing the learner assist in instructing a range of exercise sessions. This must include an induction, resistance training, cardiovascular training and circuit training sessions for a variety of clients. The learner does not need to instruct the whole session, however, they must lead part of the session and be present to assist in the rest of the session. Their ability to monitor, adapt exercises and communicate effectively can be assessed during these sessions. The learner is required to review their exercise session and exercise programme. They must evaluate the feedback they receive from clients and modify the exercise programmes accordingly. They must then also write a personal coaching plan and justify the identified development needs. Links to National Occupational Standards, other BTEC units, other BTEC qualifications and other relevant units and qualifications This unit has links with Unit 1: The Body in Sport, Unit 2: Health, Safety and Injury in Sport, Unit 4: Preparation for Sport, Unit 11: Fitness for Sports Performance and Unit 15: Sport and Leisure Facility Operations. This unit provides a progression route to the Edexcel Level 3 BTEC Nationals in Sport and Sport and Exercise Sciences. This unit has links to the National Occupational Standards at Level 2 in Instructing Exercise and Fitness. This unit also covers some of the underpinning knowledge related to entry to the Register of Exercise Professionals. This unit provides learners with the opportunity to provide evidence for key skills in communication, improving own learning and performance, problem solving and working with others. Essential resources Learners will require access to exercise and fitness facilities and equipment, as well as access to suitable groups that can be, or act as, clients. Indicative reading for learners Materials that illustrate the level of learning required and that are particularly relevant. Tutors should be aware that textbooks are frequently updated and that they should use the latest editions where available. Examples currently include: Dalgleish J et al — The Health & Fitness Handbook (Longman, 2001) Sharkey B — Fitness and Health (Human Kinetics, 2001)

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Key skills

Achievement of key skills is not a requirement of this qualification but it is encouraged. Suggestions of opportunities for the generation of level 2 key skill evidence are given here. Staff should check that learners have produced all the evidence required by part B of the key skills specifications when assessing this evidence. Learners may need to develop additional evidence elsewhere to fully meet the requirements of the key skills specifications.

Communication level 2 When learners are: • • discussing the principles of fitness training describing the principles of fitness training They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: C2.1a C2.1b C2.2 Take part in a group discussion Give a talk of at least four minutes Read and summarise information from at least two documents about the same subject. Each document must be a minimum of 500 words long. • outlining health and safety issues for clients, and outlining exercise programmes for three different types of clients. C2.3 Write two different types of documents each one giving different information. One document must be at least 500 words long.

Improving own learning and performance level 2 When learners are: • researching ways to improve their knowledge of fitness training assisting in instructing fitness training reviewing own performance in the instruction and identifying areas for improvement. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: LP2.1 Help set targets with an appropriate person and plan how these will be met. Take responsibility for some decisions about your learning, using your plan to help meet targets and improve your performance. Review progress with an appropriate person and provide evidence of your achievements.



LP2.2



LP2.3

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Problem solving level 2 When learners are: • outlining exercise programmes for clients assisting clients in their fitness training reviewing client performance in the session. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: PS2.1 Identify a problem, with help from an appropriate person, and identify different ways of tackling it. Plan and try out at least one way of solving the problem. Check if the problem has been solved and identify ways to improve problem solving skills.

• •

PS2.2 PS2.3

Working with others level 2 When learners are: • assisting in instructing various training sessions for clients They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: WO2.1 Plan work with others. WO2.2 Work co-operatively towards achieving the identified objectives. • reviewing own performance in the instruction. WO2.3 Review your contribution and agree ways to improve work with others.

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UNIT 15: SPORT AND LEISURE FACILITY OPERATIONS

Unit 15:
NQF Level 2:

Sport and Leisure Facility Operations
BTEC First

Guided learning hours: 60

Unit abstract
Effective sport and leisure facility operations are required within the sports industry to ensure the smooth running and effective management of sports facilities, leading to high performance levels and better experiences for participants. Effective operations can sustain profitability and lead to growth and expansion. This unit gives learners an opportunity to learn about the responsibilities of those working in sport and leisure facilities. The unit explores the responsibilities of staff in a sport and leisure facility, investigating their job requirements and roles, and how companies provide a safe and secure environment. Learners also look at the customer service operations within a facility, and finally, the learner is required to set up, check, take down and store sports equipment. Learners are required to know about the staffing structure within a facility and the importance of developing a positive reputation and image to attract new clients. A visit to a sport and leisure facility will enable learners to study and evaluate the effective operating procedures within the facility to enhance customer satisfaction and help ensure repeat business. Providing a safe and secure environment is also a necessity within a sport and leisure facility. The learner will need to know, and understand, how a facility provides and cares for its customers to prevent theft, fraud, violence and vandalism. To conclude, learners must show practical competence setting up, checking, taking down and storing equipment. This could be undertaken over several weeks within a variety of different facilities.

Learning outcomes
On completion of this unit a learner should: 1 2 3 4 5 Know about organisational structures and responsibilities within a sport and leisure facility Understand the importance of providing a safe and secure environment Understand customer service in sport and leisure facilities Be able to set up, check, take down and store equipment used for sports activities Be able to monitor and review their own performance in sport and leisure facility operations.

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Unit content

1 Know about organisational structures and responsibilities within a sport and leisure facility Organisational structure: eg hierarchical, responsibilities of staff, procedures, person specification, job requirements, job roles, recruitment of staff Responsibilities of staff: eg time keeping, personal presentation, attitude, professionalism, accountability, reporting to line management, communication skills, updating skills (continuing professional development — CPD), opening and closing the facility, tidying, record keeping, financial (cash handling, budget holder responsibilities) Staff teams: eg management, maintenance, instructors, reception, grounds staff, security, cleaning Facilities: eg leisure centres, swimming pools, gyms, health clubs, sports clubs 2 Understand the importance of providing a safe and secure environment Safe environment: procedures in place to provide a safe environment eg checking of facilities, risk assessments; legislation and regulations eg health and safety, reporting of diseases, dangerous occurrences, first aid, manual handling, working time Secure environment: procedures and mechanisms used eg to prevent violence, theft, fraud, vandalism Procedures: eg fire procedures, safety signage, security (facility, property, money, closed circuit television — CCTV), staff identification, first aid and emergency, maintainence Environment: eg car park, reception, changing rooms, main area of activity; swimming pool, gym, changing rooms 3 Understand customer service in sport and leisure facilities Customer service: definition; importance eg satisfaction, increased sales, increased profits, better image, better reputation, competitive edge; methods used to maintain business, customer relations, positive relationships with customers Customers: types eg individuals, groups, age, cultures, specific needs; needs eg information, advice, assistance, products, services Procedures: eg dealing with complaints, presentation (attitude, personality, hygiene) 4 Be able to set up, check, take down and store equipment used for sports activities Set up: set up appropriate equipment safely, following correct procedures Check: eg whilst in use, maintain, alterations where appropriate, health and safety (organisers, participants, spectators) Take down: take down equipment safely, following correct procedures Store: store equipment safely, following correct procedures Activities: sports eg football, cricket, badminton, athletics

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UNIT 15: SPORT AND LEISURE FACILITY OPERATIONS

5

Be able to monitor and review own performance in sport and leisure facility operations Monitor: eg aims and objectives, methods (interviews, witness testimony, feedback, video, audio) Review: formative and summative; feedback (from participants, colleagues, observers); strengths and areas for development; documentation Recommendations: eg areas for improvement, personal development, support required, action planning

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Grading grid

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all of the learning outcomes for the unit. The criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit.

Grading criteria To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to: M1 explain the responsibilities of four different staff teams in a selected sport and leisure facility M2 explain why it is important to provide safe and secure sport and leisure facilities, and explain procedures used to ensure this M3 explain the importance of effective customer service, and procedures used to achieve it in a selected sport and leisure facility M4 independently set up, check, take down and store equipment for three different sports activities M5 monitor and review own performance in the setting up, checking, taking down and storage of equipment for three different sports activities, describing strengths and areas for development, and making suggestions relating to development. To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to: D1 evaluate the responsibilities of four different staff teams in a selected sport and leisure facility, making reference to procedures used to provide effective customer service and a safe and secure environment D2 monitor and review own performance in the setting up, checking, taking down and storage of equipment for three different sports activities, explaining strengths and areas for development, and justify suggestions relating to development.

To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

P1 describe the organisational structure of a selected sport and leisure facility, and the responsibilities of four different staff teams

P2 describe why it is important to provide a safe and secure environment, and procedures used to ensure this in a selected sport and leisure facility

P3 describe the importance of providing, and identify procedures used to provide, effective customer service in a selected sport and leisure facility

P4 set up, check, take down and store equipment for three different sports activities, with tutor support

P5 monitor and review own performance in the setting up, checking, taking down and storage of equipment for three different sports activities, identifying strengths and areas for development.

Guidance to support the assessment of this unit is available on page 125.
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Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery This unit provides the opportunity for learners to develop knowledge, understanding and competence within a facility operations. Learners will have the opportunity to look into working life within the sports industry, and as a consequence, this unit it may be delivered with, or as an alternative to, the work-based project. It would be useful to visit sport and leisure facilities, providing learners with insight in to the operating of the facility and the demands placed on staff. If a visit is not viable, learners will be dependent upon structured theoretical teaching, covering issues based around staff responsibilities, customer service and safety and security. Learners must also be able to demonstrate practical competence in setting up, checking, taking down and storing equipment. This could be done within a sports hall, fitness suite, or other suitable facility. Sports facilities will be required for both the delivery and the assessment of this unit. Guest presenters would prove valuable to learners, providing ideas and comparisons different from those identified in the visited, or studied, facility. This could be complimented with learner research from textbooks, journals or the internet. In guiding learners, tutors should take in to account the career aspirations and plans of learners as well as their educational needs. When looking at staffing delivery could be through a speaker, a visit, fact sheets about selected facilities. When covering safety and security a visit followed by a discussion will enable learners to develop their own knowledge, which can be added to by researching information from the internet and other. Customer service can be delivered with many different approaches, including role-plays, clips from television programmes, tutor led discussions, demonstrations or guest speakers. The setting, checking, taking down and storing of equipment should be demonstrated by tutors, or staff at a facility, then role-plays and video evidence can support delivery. Limited delivery is required in evaluating own performance therefore a logbook, witness evidence or video taping could prove useful. Assessment When considering strategies for assessment tutors should consider both the theoretical requirements and the practical elements that require assessment. The assessment criteria can be separated in to relevant learning outcomes to enable paced task deadlines or it could be delivered as a single unit assessment, this may prove particularly useful when assessing distinction criteria. Through dividing assessment some formative assessment could be used which may prove valuable to tutors and learners when developing learners skills practically. When covering the staffing section learners should be requested to draw a hierarchical staffing structure, starting from the top down. Staffing responsibilities would need to be further explained to achieve the higher grades. Assessment could be done through a task, which could be supplemented by a poster or chart. To ensure the learning outcome is vocationally relevant tasks could be based around a visit to a facility.

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Customer service could also be evidenced by learners producing customer service handbooks and using role-play. When examining customer service learners will need to cover a variety of procedures, which could be assessed through a presentation, perhaps including some demonstrations. Presentations could also be used to cover safety and security or this aspect could be assessed separately through a written task. Evidence relating to organisational structures and responsibilities could take the form of a written task, but could equally be a poster or information leaflet. Tutors could use formative assessment strategies when assessing a learner’s ability to operate a facility, and when learners are competent summative assessments can be carried out. Assessment of this outcome is based around how dependent the learner is on the tutor when dealing with the equipment. Tutors must use their professional judgement, and possibly witness testimony, when determining the level of learner achievement. Learner’s review of their ability to operate a facility could be assessed in the form of a logbook, with learners making comments on the range of activities they are required to do. A range should be at least the setting up of four sessions. Tutors could then either suggest action points or assess the ideas learners have come up with from the logbook or written tasks. Links to National Occupational Standards, other BTEC units, other BTEC qualifications and other relevant units and qualifications This unit has links with Unit 2: Health, Safety and Injury in Sport, Unit 5: Planning and Leading Sports Activities, Unit 6: Practical Sport, Unit 13: Work-based Project in Sport and Unit 14: Instructing Exercise and Fitness. This unit provides a progression route from the Edexcel Level 1 BTEC Introductory Certificate and Diploma in Sport and Leisure, and progression to the Edexcel Level 3 BTEC Nationals in Sport and Sport and Exercise Sciences. This unit has links to the National Occupational Standards in Operational Services at Level 2. This unit provides learners with the opportunity to provide evidence for key skills in communication and problem solving. Essential resources Learners would require access to a range of sports and recreational facilities and equipment, and also access to suitable groups that could be used as participants. Indicative reading for learners Materials that illustrate the level of learning required and that are particularly relevant. Tutors should be aware that textbooks are frequently updated and that they should use the latest editions where available. Examples currently include: Dalgleish J et al — The Health & Fitness Handbook (Longman, 2001) Harris B et al — BTEC First Sport: Student Book (Heinemann, 2004) Honeybourne J — BTEC First in Sport (Nelson, Thornes 2005)

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Key skills

Achievement of key skills is not a requirement of this qualification but it is encouraged. Suggestions of opportunities for the generation of level 2 key skill evidence are given here. Staff should check that learners have produced all the evidence required by part B of the key skills specifications when assessing this evidence. Learners may need to develop additional evidence elsewhere to fully meet the requirements of the key skills specifications.

Communication level 2 When learners are: • They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: Take part in a group discussion

C2.1a describing, explaining and evaluating findings from the visit to a facility self-evaluation from the setting up, checking, taking down and storing reading information from the facility visit eg handbook, or reading theoretical evidence provided by the tutor on a facility producing a customer charter, customer letter, logbook, selfevaluation. C2.1b



Give a talk of at least four minutes



C2.2

Read and summarise information from at least two documents about the same subject. Each document must be a minimum of 500 words long.



C2.3

Write two different types of documents each one giving different information. One document must be at least 500 words long.

Problem solving level 2 When learners are: • planning equipment to be used in sports activities setting up equipment for sports activities reviewing performance and identifying strengths and areas for improvement. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: PS2.1 Identify a problem, with help from an appropriate person, and identify different ways of tackling it. Plan and try out at least one way of solving the problem. Check if the problem has been solved and identify ways to improve problem solving skills.



PS2.2

ƒ

PS2.3

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UNIT 16: LEADING OUTDOOR AND ADVENTUROUS ACTIVITIES

Unit 16:
NQF Level 2:

Leading Outdoor and Adventurous Activities
BTEC First

Guided learning hours: 60

Unit abstract
The increased participation in outdoor and adventurous activities has helped to encourage many people to keep active, and has also created a market for leaders and providers of these activities in a safe and positive environment. This unit provides learners with the opportunity to engage in leading outdoor and adventurous activities, and reflect on their experiences in order to identify and extend their knowledge and skills in these activities. It also provides an opportunity for self-discovery, self-confidence, and the development of interpersonal and communication skills as well as leadership qualities. Learners should expect to spend time in the outdoors actively participating in adventurous activities, and may have transferable skills or prior knowledge associated with the Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme, Scouts and Guides, local clubs and perhaps even with family and other groups. Those with prior knowledge will have an opportunity in this unit to improve and expand on their knowledge base and improve their practice of techniques. This unit focuses on the development of leadership skills in two different outdoor and adventurous activities. The associated safety aspects are the primary concerns for both tutors and learners. Concepts of safety and emergency procedures, including risk assessments, recognition of natural hazards, group safety, correct use of equipment, the effects of heat, cold dehydration and exhaustion are covered.

Learning outcomes
On completion of this unit a learner should: 1 2 3 Understand the skills, qualities and responsibilities associated with successful outdoor and adventurous activity leadership Be able to plan and lead, under supervision, outdoor and adventurous activities Be able to review their planning and leadership of outdoor and adventurous activities.

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Unit content

1 Understand the skills, qualities and responsibilities associated with successful outdoor and adventurous activity leadership Skills: eg communication, use of language, supervision and support (groups and individuals), decision-making, equipment (use, selection), improvisation, knowledge, specific skills (canoe strokes, rescue techniques, belaying, knots) Qualities: eg confidence, authority, humour, organisation, initiative, style of leadership Responsibilities: eg conduct, health and safety (emergency procedures, safe conduct of group and individuals, first aid), transport and travel arrangements, equipment (use, transport), contingency plans, nutrition and hydration Outdoor and adventurous activities: eg orienteering, rock climbing, skiing, snowboarding, canoeing, kayaking, sailing, windsurfing, mountain biking, body boarding, surfing 2 Be able to plan and lead, under supervision, outdoor and adventurous activities Plan: participants eg age, ability, gender, numbers, medical, specific needs; resources eg equipment (selection, preparation, packing, storing, carrying, use), maps, guides, protection; specific eg routes, travel and transport (types, timing, cost), environmental (respect, conservation, hazards); timing; conduct eg codes of contact (governing body, centre specific); contingency; governing body guidelines Lead: under supervision; demonstration of appropriate skills, qualities and responsibilities appropriate to activities eg safe and correct use of appropriate equipment Activities: different activities eg land-based, water-based; structure and components of activity eg warm up, instruction, cool down Recording: eg diary, logbook, portfolio, video, audio, observation record, witness testimony, feedback sheets 3 Be able to review their planning and leadership of outdoor and adventurous activities Review: feedback (from participants, supervisor, peers, observers); strengths and areas for improvement; against plan and governing body guidelines Set targets for improvement: specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, time-bound (SMART); development plans; development opportunities eg specific training and courses

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Grading grid

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all of the learning outcomes for the unit. The criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit.

Grading criteria To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to: M1 D1 explain the skills, qualities and responsibilities associated with successful leadership of three different outdoor and adventurous activities independently produce a plan for leading, and lead under supervision, two different outdoor and adventurous activities explain their strengths and areas for improvement in leading outdoor and adventurous activities, making suggestions relating to improvement. To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to: evaluate own performance in leading outdoor and adventurous activities, commenting on own effectiveness, strengths and areas for improvement and development as a leader of outdoor and adventurous activities.

To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

P1

describe the skills, qualities and responsibilities associated with successful leadership of three different outdoor and adventurous activities M2

P2

produce a plan for leading two different outdoor and adventurous activities, with tutor support M3

P3

lead, with tutor support and under supervision, two different outdoor and adventurous activities

P4

review their performance in planning and leading outdoor and adventurous activities, identifying strengths and areas for improvement.

Guidance to support the assessment of this unit is available on page 132.

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Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery It is important that learners develop an understanding of the roles and responsibilities of leaders in outdoor and adventurous activities. Practical situations, either through role play or observations, should be used to support knowledge gained in the classroom. Leadership skills should be developed through experience, guided and supported by the tutor. There are probably many experienced practitioners working within each centre. To be able to understand the skills, qualities and responsibilities associated with successful outdoor and adventurous activities leadership, learners could observe and work alongside an experienced and competent leader. At an early stage in the course learners should be given the opportunity to lead their peer group in some form of practical activity. This is an ideal way for each learner to experience the role and encounter the difficulties that may arise. It is essential that learners also experience, and understand, the value of working effectively as a member of a team, this will be important when leading sessions at a later stage. Hands-on experiential learning will ideally be reinforced by the participation and co-operation of the learner’s peers as well as tutors/activity leaders. This will help develop confidence, organisational and personal skills which can be used throughout the unit. The review of the activity sessions is essential and participants and observers should complete feedback sheets. Learners should also be encouraged to use video, which will provide them with more evidence for their review. When undertaking the leadership of outdoor and adventurous activities, learners must be supervised directly by a qualified leader with a recognised qualification for the specific activity being undertaken. In many cases this may be the tutor or another member of staff at the centre. However, outside leaders or activity centres may be employed to provide facilities and personnel to supervise learners. In this situation, the tutor must still be responsible for developing and assessing the leadership aspects of learners activities. This unit could be run along side national governing body awards, and evidence from this unit may be used to achieve some of the outcomes of the awards, or vice versa. Assessment A range of methods may be used to assess this unit. Learners could produce a poster which displays the requirements of successful leadership of Outdoor and Adventurous activities. The poster could divided into the sections of skills, qualities and responsibilities. This could then act as a visual stimulant throughout learners’ leadership experience. An extended piece of written work, alongside the poster, may be required to fulfil the higher-grade criteria. Looking at a range of different leaders, indifferent activities will enable learners to develop a greater understanding of the range of people involved in sports leadership, and the variety of skills and qualities each one possesses. The planning of activities could be evidenced in written tasks, practical exercises or classroom activities. The practical elements can be assessed using observations and witness statements as well as video or photographic evidence.

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After leading activity sessions learners are required to review their performance. This should identify both strengths and areas for development. Evidence could be gained through feedback from participants and observers. Forms and documentation used for this should be submitted by learners as part of their evidence. Links to National Occupational Standards, other BTEC units, other BTEC qualifications and other relevant units and qualifications This unit has links with Unit 2: Health, Safety and Injury in Sport, Unit 7: Practical Outdoor and Adventurous Activities, Unit 13: Work-based Project in Sport and Unit 17: Expedition Experience. This unit provides a progression route to the Edexcel Level 3 BTEC Nationals in Sport and Sport and Exercise Sciences. This unit links with governing body training and awards, such as Mountain Leader Training England (MLTE) awards for navigation, and also the Basic Expedition Leaders Award (BELA). This unit has links to the National Occupational Standards in Activity Leadership at Level 2. This unit provides learners with the opportunity to provide evidence for key skills in communication, improving own learning and performance, problem solving and working with others. Essential resources Learners will require access to equipment required for activities that will be lead, for example navigational equipment, camping equipment (such as tents and cooking equipment), emergency equipment (such as first aid). Indicative reading for learners Materials that illustrate the level of learning required and that are particularly relevant. Climbers World Summit Websites which may support the delivery of this unit include: British Sports Trust Mountain Leader Training England www.bst.org.uk www.mltb.org

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Key skills

Achievement of key skills is not a requirement of this qualification but it is encouraged. Suggestions of opportunities for the generation of level 2 key skill evidence are given here. Staff should check that learners have produced all the evidence required by part B of the key skills specifications when assessing this evidence. Learners may need to develop additional evidence elsewhere to fully meet the requirements of the key skills specifications.

Communication level 2 When learners are: • • planning to lead outdoor and adventurous activities leading, or organising groups, for outdoor and adventurous activities researching legislation and guidelines relating to leading outdoor and adventurous activities such as literature relating to rights of way, the environment and conservation reviewing their leadership of outdoor and adventurous activities. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: C2.1a C2.1b Take part in a group discussion Give a talk of at least four minutes



C2.2

Read and summarise information from at least two documents about the same subject. Each document must be a minimum of 500 words long.



C2.3

Write two different types of documents each one giving different information. One document must be at least 500 words long.

Improving own learning and performance level 2 When learners are: • planning to lead outdoor and adventurous activities, and considering areas for improvement after reviewing their leadership leading outdoor and adventurous activities reviewing their leadership of outdoor and adventurous activities. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: LP2.1 Help set targets with an appropriate person and plan how these will be met.



LP2.2

Take responsibility for some decisions about your learning, using your plan to help meet targets and improve your performance. Review progress with an appropriate person and provide evidence of your achievements.



LP2.3

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Problem solving level 2 When learners are: • planning to lead outdoor and adventurous activities leading outdoor and adventurous activities reviewing their leadership of outdoor and adventurous activities. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: PS2.1 Identify a problem, with help from an appropriate person, and identify different ways of tackling it. Plan and try out at least one way of solving the problem. Check if the problem has been solved and identify ways to improve problem solving skills.

• •

PS2.2 PS2.3

Working with others level 2 When learners are: • • • planning to lead outdoor and adventurous activities leading outdoor and adventurous activities leading outdoor and adventurous activities and reviewing their leadership of outdoor and adventurous activities. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: WO2.1 Plan work with others. WO2.2 Work co-operatively towards achieving the identified objectives. WO2.3 Review your contribution and agree ways to improve work with others.

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UNIT 17: EXPEDITION EXPERIENCE

Unit 17:
NQF Level 2:

Expedition Experience
BTEC First

Guided learning hours: 60

Unit abstract
Growing numbers of people are taking part in a variety of outdoor and adventurous activities, and the undertaking of expeditions and excursions into more open country has increased significantly. Learning how to safely plan, undertake and evaluate these activities can enable the learner to enjoy such pursuits, providing an opportunity for self-discovery, and the development of self-confidence, interpersonal and communication skills as well as leadership qualities. Learners should expect to spend a significant time in the open countryside whilst undertaking this unit. Learners may already have transferable skills, or prior knowledge, associated with experience with the Duke of Edinburgh Scheme, Scouts, Guides, local clubs or perhaps even with family and other groups. Those with prior knowledge will have an opportunity in this unit to improve and expand on their knowledge base, and improve their techniques and skills. The unit focuses on the awareness and development of skills in navigation and route planning, which are fundamental when embarking on expeditions. The safety aspects of such an excursion are a primary concern for both learners and tutors, concepts of safety and emergency procedures, including risk assessment, recognition of natural hazards, effects of heat, cold dehydration and exhaustion are covered Completion of this unit requires at least one overnight stay. This may be under canvas or in dedicated self-catering accommodation such as a hostel. There is also an emphasis on the practical ability to choose the correct equipment, and demonstrate proficient use of specific expedition kit. This may include camp cooking, tent erection and the transport and storage of equipment. Environmental and countryside issues are also covered, providing learners with understanding of current legislation and of the environmental impact of expedition activity.

Learning outcomes
On completion of this unit a learner should: 1 2 3 4 Understand the safety and environmental considerations for a multiday expedition Be able to use skills and techniques required for a multiday expedition Be able to use the equipment required for a multiday expedition Be able to plan, carry out and review a multiday expedition.

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Unit content

1

Understand the safety and environmental considerations for a multiday expedition Safety considerations: risk assessments; emergency procedures (rescue, survival, distress signals, contacting emergency services, conditions; equipment (first aid, shelter, food, survival, dangerous or combustible substances); escape routes; guidelines eg governing bodies, own centre; legislation eg children, health and safety Environmental considerations: eg flora, fauna, wildlife (respect, preservation and conservation); status eg protected species, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, National Parks, common land, open countryside, guidelines and legislation eg country code, rights of way, governing bodies

2

Be able to use skills and techniques required for a multiday expedition Skills and techniques: navigation (maps, grid referencing, contours, route plans, natural features and gradients, signs, compass, night or limited visibility navigation, direction determination without compass); camp (choosing a site and setting up); transportation (land and water, road and trail, modes of transport)

3

Be able to use the equipment required for a multiday expedition Equipment: maintenance; use (safe, correct); care; cleaning; types eg shelter and protection (tents, sleeping bag, clothing, footwear), cooking equipment, food storage, bags and rucksacks (carrying and packing)

4

Be able to plan, carry out and review a multiday expedition Plan: eg permission, consent and access, route (plan route cards, route description), booking facilities, transportation, equipment and logistics, accommodation, meals (planning, dietary considerations, nutrition for physical activity), weather information, journey times, terrain, emergency contacts, plans (contingencies and escape) Review: feedback (from participants, supervisor, peers, observers); strengths and areas for improvement; against plan and governing body guidelines Set targets for improvement: specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, time-bound (SMART); development plans; development opportunities eg specific training and courses .

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Grading grid

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all of the learning outcomes for the unit. The criteria for a pass grade describe the level of achievement required to pass this unit.

Grading criteria To achieve a merit grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass criteria, the learner is able to: M1 M2 M3 M4 independently undertake a multiday expedition demonstrating the use of relevant skills and required equipment explain identified strengths and areas for improvement, suggesting strategies to improve future performance. independently produce a plan for a multiday expedition D3 explain the skills and techniques required for a multiday expedition D2 explain safety and environmental considerations for a multiday expedition D1 To achieve a distinction grade the evidence must show that, in addition to the pass and merit criteria, the learner is able to: justify decisions made in the planning of a multiday expedition justify use of skills and equipment in the undertaking of a multiday expedition

To achieve a pass grade the evidence must show that the learner is able to:

P1

describe safety and environmental considerations for a multiday expedition

P2

describe the skills and techniques required for a multiday expedition

P3

describe the equipment required for a multiday expedition

P4

produce a plan, with tutor support, for a multiday expedition M5

evaluate performance in the planning and undertaking of a multiday expedition, suggesting strategies to improve future performance and justifying suggestions.

P5

undertake, with tutor support, a multiday expedition, demonstrating the use of relevant skills and required equipment

P6

review their performance in the planning and undertaking of a multiday expedition, identifying strengths and areas for improvement.

Guidance to support the assessment of this unit is available on page 140.

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Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery This unit is a practical and active introduction into expeditions and outdoor pursuits. This unit should be delivered in a practical way in an appropriate environment using the appropriate equipment. The expedition must include at least one overnight. This would ideally be under canvas, to maximise the potential for learning to use equipment, and to practice skills such as camp craft in the open countryside. Use of hostels or bunkhouse accommodation is acceptable where camping is impractical or unsafe. Learners should have access to camping, navigation and safety equipment, while being able to use this kit in real situations wherever possible. Learners should have access to qualified expedition leaders, either as part of a club or through other groups. This unit covers the navigation, safety and technical aspects of an expedition in detail. However, it does not necessarily qualify learners for national governing body recognition as an activity leader, although it could be run along side such awards. Learners should not only show their understanding of safety and environmental issues through their written work, but show it through observations of their practice and awareness while actually undertaking the expedition. They could also be introduced to emergency situations through role-play or scenarios. In reviewing their work, learners should be using reflective practice to understand their own and others performance. This could involve setting their own goals and expectations in conjunction with using SWOT analysis to develop an action plan for future improvement and learning. They will also benefit from analysing each other’s performance. In the field should be left as much as possible to independently, and experientially, acquire skills and understanding, as well as supporting others. Assessment This unit can be assessed in a wide range of ways, through both practical and written work. The practical elements can be evidenced using observations, witness testimony or a log, or record, or learners activities and participation. When planning the expedition, learners should have an opportunity to handle and practice using equipment and skills, while creating evidence, perhaps written, of planning. This written evidence should include a standard route card for navigation. There should also be some form of risk assessment, either created as a group or individual task. Evidence should also include reflection on, and evaluation of, their learning and development over the course of the expedition, and the whole unit overall. This may take the form of a learning journal or some kind of action plan, which can be analysed and reviewed. Links to National Occupational Standards, other BTEC units, other BTEC qualifications and other relevant units and qualifications This unit has links with Unit 2: Health, Safety and Injury in Sport, Unit 7: Practical Outdoor and Adventurous Activities and Unit 16: Leading Outdoor and Adventurous Activities. This unit provides a progression route to the Edexcel Level 3 BTEC Nationals in Sport (Outdoor Education).

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This units has links to awards from organisations such as the Mountain Leader Training Board and the Basic Expedition Leaders Award. This unit provides learners with the opportunity to provide evidence for key skills in communication, improving own learning and performance, problem solving and working with others. Essential resources Learners will require access to the appropriate environment, or facility, and equipment required for activities, for example navigational equipment, camping equipment (such as tents and cooking equipment), emergency equipment (such as first aid). Indicative reading for learners Materials that illustrate the level of learning required and that are particularly relevant. Tutors should be aware that textbooks are frequently updated and that they should use the latest editions where available. Examples currently include: Langmuir E — Mountain Craft and Leadership (Scottish Sports Council and Mountain Leader Training Board, 1999)

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Key skills

Achievement of key skills is not a requirement of this qualification but it is encouraged. Suggestions of opportunities for the generation of level 2 key skill evidence are given here. Staff should check that learners have produced all the evidence required by part B of the key skills specifications when assessing this evidence. Learners may need to develop additional evidence elsewhere to fully meet the requirements of the key skills specifications.

Communication level 2 When learners are: • • planning a multiday expedition discussing topics such as the safety and environmental considerations for a multiday expedition researching topics such as the safety and environmental considerations for a multiday expedition reviewing performance in the planning and undertaking of a multiday expedition. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: C2.1a C2.1b Take part in a group discussion Give a talk of at least four minutes



C2.2

Read and summarise information from at least two documents about the same subject. Each document must be a minimum of 500 words long.



C2.3

Write two different types of documents each one giving different information. One document must be at least 500 words long.

Improving own learning and performance level 2 When learners are: • planning a multiday expedition, and considering areas for improvement undertaking a multiday expedition, reviewing performance and considering areas for improvement reviewing performance in the planning and undertaking of a multiday expedition. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: LP2.1 Help set targets with an appropriate person and plan how these will be met. Take responsibility for some decisions about your learning, using your plan to help meet targets and improve your performance. Review progress with an appropriate person and provide evidence of your achievements.



LP2.2



LP2.3

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Problem solving level 2 When learners are: • planning and undertaking a multiday expedition, and considering areas for improvement undertaking a multiday expedition, and considering areas for improvement reviewing performance in the planning and undertaking of a multiday expedition. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: PS2.1 Identify a problem, with help from an appropriate person, and identify different ways of tackling it. Plan and try out at least one way of solving the problem. Check if the problem has been solved and identify ways to improve problem solving skills.



PS2.2



PS2.3

Working with others level 2 When learners are: • planning a multiday expedition, and considering areas for improvement undertaking a multiday expedition undertaking a multiday expedition, reviewing performance and considering areas for improvement. They should be able to develop the following key skills evidence: WO2.1 Plan work with others.

• •

WO2.2 Work co-operatively towards achieving the identified objectives. WO2.3 Review your contribution and agree ways to improve work with others.

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Assessment and grading
The purpose of assessment is to ensure that effective learning of the content of each unit has taken place. Assignments should ensure coverage of all the criteria in the unit as set out in the Grading grid for each unit. It is advisable that criteria are clearly indicated on each assignment to provide a focus for learners (for transparency and to help ensure that feedback is specific to the criteria) and to assist with internal verification and standardisation processes. Tasks and activities should enable learners to produce evidence that relates directly to the specified criteria. Assignments constructed by centres should be valid, reliable and fit for purpose, building on the application of the grading criteria. Centres should use a variety of assessment methods, including case studies, assignments and work-based assessments, along with projects, performance observation and time-constrained assessments. Centres are encouraged to place emphasis on the practical application of the grading criteria, providing a realistic scenario for learners to adopt, and making maximum use of practical activities and work experience. The creation of assignments that are fit for purpose is vital to achievement by learners and their importance cannot be over emphasised. When reading the Grading grids and designing assessment instruments, centres should note that for learners to achieve a merit/distinction grade they will be required to provide evidence that is qualitative in its nature. Centres are encouraged to look across each assessment criterion in the Grading grid to identify common topics within units and to assess learners’ work according to the level that they have achieved as determined by the grading criteria. The grading criteria are developed in relation to grading domains which provide for the assessment of the learning outcomes of the unit. There are four grading domains which underpin the grading criteria. • Application of knowledge and understanding. • Development of practical and technical skills. • Personal development for occupational roles. • Application of generic and key skills. The qualitative nature of the merit and distinction grading criteria are based upon indicative characteristics required of the assessment evidence to fulfil the higher grades. Please refer to Annexe B. A grading scale of pass, merit and distinction is applied to all units. In the Edexcel BTEC Firsts all units are internally assessed. All assessment for BTEC Firsts is criterion referenced, based on the achievement of specified outcomes. Each unit has specified criteria to be used for grading. A summative unit grade can be awarded at pass, merit or distinction: • to achieve a ‘pass’ a learner must have satisfied all the pass criteria • to achieve a ‘merit’ a learner must additionally have satisfied all the merit criteria • to achieve a ‘distinction’ a learner must additionally have satisfied all the distinction criteria. Learners who complete the unit but who do not meet all the pass criteria are graded ‘unclassified’.

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Quality assurance
Edexcel’s qualification specifications set out clearly the standard to be achieved by each learner in order to gain the award of the qualification. This is covered in the statement of outcomes and grading criteria in each unit. Further guidance on delivery and assessment is given in the Essential guidance for tutors section of each unit. This section is designed to provide additional guidance and amplification related to the unit to support tutors, deliverers and assessors and to provide for a coherence of understanding and a consistency of delivery and assessment. Edexcel operates a quality assurance process which is designed to ensure that these standards are maintained by all internal verifiers and external verifiers. It achieves this through the following activities.

Approval
Centres will be allowed ‘accelerated approval’ for a new programme where the centre already has approval for a programme that is being replaced by the new programme. Centres wishing to offer a vocational area for the first time will need to apply for approval to offer the programme. Centres that have not previously offered BTEC qualifications will first need to apply for, and be granted, centre approval before they can apply for approval to offer the programme. When a centre applies for approval to offer a BTEC qualification they will be required to enter into an approvals agreement. The approvals contract is a formal commitment by the head or principal of a centre to meet all the requirements of the specification and linked codes or regulations. Sanctions and tariffs may be applied if centres do not comply with the agreement. Ultimately, this could result in the suspension of certification or withdrawal of approval.

Risk assessment
Edexcel has an approval process which creates a quality profile of each qualification programme in each centre and for the centre as a whole. This profile contributes to the determination of the nature of external verification activity for each programme and will also be used to initiate other quality control measures by Edexcel.

Internal verification
Centres are required to have processes in place reviewing each assessor’s decisions to ensure that they are correctly interpreting and applying the standards set out in the specifications. The system used to do this is a matter for individual centres and Edexcel fully supports the use of the centre’s own quality assurance systems where this ensures robust internal standardisation. Centres should refer to the BTEC NQF Level 2/3 (including Short Courses at Levels 1–3) Handbook (updated annually). This updated information may also be found on the Edexcel website/Services for centres/FE Colleges and Schools.

External verification
Edexcel will sample assessors’ decisions using sector-specialist external verifiers. For BTEC Firsts this process will follow the National Standards Sampling (NSS) protocol. The learner work must have been internally assessed. Additionally, at least 50 per cent of submitted work must have been internally verified. Centres should refer to the BTEC NQF Level 2/3 (including Short Courses at Levels 1–3)(updated annually). This updated information may also be found on the Edexcel website/Services for centres/FE Colleges and Schools.

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Calculation of the qualification grade
Awarding a qualification grade
The qualification grade will be calculated through the aggregation of points achieved through the successful achievement of individual units. Learners will achieve a pass, merit or distinction qualification grade based on the attainment of a stated minimum number of points for each unit grade. The number of points available will be dependent on the unit grade achieved and the size of the unit as determined by the stipulated guided learning hours. For the calculation of a qualification grade for a BTEC First Certificate and a BTEC First Diploma a learner must: • complete all designated units • achieve a minimum points score of 18 points for a First Certificate and 36 points for a First Diploma • achieve a pass grade for all designated units for a First Certificate and achieve a pass grade for units with a combined total of 300 guided learning hours for a First Diploma. Points available Size of unit (GLH) 10 30 60 90 120 Qualification grade Qualification BTEC First Certificate (54 maximum) BTEC First Diploma (108 maximum) Pass grade 18–29 36–59 Merit grade 30–41 60–83 Distinction grade 42–53 84–95 Distinction* 54 96–108 Pass grade 1 3 6 9 12 Merit grade 2 6 12 18 24 Distinction grade 3 9 18 27 36

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School and College Achievement and Attainment Tables (SCAAT) equivalence
BTEC First Certificate and SCAAT points BTEC First Certificates attract points for the DfES School and College Achievement and Attainment Tables (formerly Performance Tables). The qualification attracts the same points as two GCSEs at A* – C, and contributes 40 per cent towards the threshold. For the detailed point scores for a pass, merit, distinction, and distinction*, please see the QCA Openquals website at: www.openquals.org.uk. BTEC grade boundaries 18–29 30–41 42–48 49–54 BTEC First Certificate grade Pass Merit Distinction Distinction* P M D D* SCAAT points and GCSE grade equivalence CC BB AA A* A*

BTEC First Diploma and SCAAT points BTEC First Diplomas attract points for the DfES School and College Achievement and Attainment Tables (formerly Performance Tables). The qualification attracts the same points as four GCSEs at A* – C, and contributes 80 per cent towards the threshold. For the detailed point scores for a pass, merit, distinction, and distinction*, please see the QCA Openquals website at: www.openquals.org.uk. BTEC grade boundaries 36–59 60–83 84–95 96–108 BTEC First Diploma grade Pass Merit Distinction Distinction* P M D D* SCAAT points and GCSE grade equivalence CCCC BBBB AAAA A* A* A* A*

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Programme design and delivery
These qualifications consist of core units (which are mandatory) and specialist units. Specialist units are designed to provide a specific focus to the qualification. Required combinations of specialist units are set out clearly in relation to each qualification in the defined qualification structures provided in this document. In BTEC First qualifications each unit is 30, 60, 90 or 120 guided learning hours. The definition of guided learning hours is ‘a notional measure of the substance of a qualification’. It includes an estimate of time that might be allocated to direct teaching, instruction and assessment, together with other structured learning time such as directed assignments or supported individual study. It excludes learner-initiated private study. Centres are advised to consider this definition when planning the programme of study associated with this specification.

Mode of delivery
Edexcel does not define the mode of study for BTEC First qualifications. Centres are free to offer the qualifications using any mode of delivery that meets the needs of their learners. This may be through traditional classroom teaching, open learning, distance learning or a combination of these. Whatever mode of delivery is used, centres must ensure that learners have appropriate access to the resources identified in the specifications and to the subject specialists delivering the units. This is particularly important for learners studying for the qualification through open or distance learning. Learners studying for the qualification on a part-time basis bring with them a wealth of experience that should be utilised to maximum effect by tutors and assessors. Assessment evidence based on the learners’ work environment should be encouraged. Those planning the programme should aim to enhance the vocational nature of the BTEC First qualification by: • liaising with employers to ensure a course relevant to the specific needs of the learners • accessing and using non-confidential data and documents from learners’ workplaces • including sponsoring employers in the delivery of the programme and, where appropriate, in the assessment • linking with company-based/workplace training programmes • making full use of the variety of experience of work and life that learners bring to the programme.

Resources
BTEC First qualifications are designed to prepare learners for employment in specific sectors. Physical resources need to support the delivery of the programme and the proper assessment of the outcomes and therefore should normally be of industry standard. Staff delivering programmes and conducting the assessments should be fully familiar with current practice and standards in the sector concerned. Centres will need to meet any specialist resource requirements when they seek approval from Edexcel. Where specific resources are required these have been indicated in individual units under the Essential resources section.

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Delivery approach
It is important that centres develop an approach to teaching and learning that supports the specialist vocational nature of BTEC First qualifications. Specifications contain a balance of practical skill development and knowledge requirements, some of which can be theoretical in nature. Tutors and assessors need to ensure that appropriate links are made between theory and practice and that the knowledge base is applied to the sector. This will require the development of relevant and up-to-date teaching materials that allow learners to apply their learning to actual events and activity within the sector. Maximum use should be made of the learner’s experience.

Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)
Edexcel encourages centres to recognise learners’ previous achievements and experience through APL. Learners may have evidence that has been generated during previous study or in their previous or current employment or whilst undertaking voluntary work that relates to one or more of the units in the qualification. Assessors should assess this evidence against the National Occupational Standards mapped in the specification. As with all evidence, assessors should be satisfied about the authenticity and currency of the material when considering whether or not the outcomes of the unit have been met. Full guidance on Edexcel’s policy on APL is provided on our website: www.edexcel.org.uk

Meeting local needs
Centres should note the qualifications set out in these specifications have been developed in consultation with centres and employers, particularly SkillsActive, the Sector Skills Council for the Active Leisure and Learning sector. The units are designed to meet the skill needs of the sector and the specialist units allow coverage of the full range of employment. Centres should make maximum use of the choice available to them within the specialist units in these specifications to meet the needs of their learners, and the local skills and training needs identified by organisations such as the Regional Development Agency and the Local Learning and Skills Council. In certain circumstances, the units contained in these specifications may not enable centres to meet a local need. In this situation centres may seek approval from Edexcel to make use of units from other standard NQF BTEC First Diploma specifications. Centres will need to justify the need for importing units from other specifications and Edexcel will ensure that the vocational focus of the qualification has not been diluted. Units that have externally set assignments cannot be imported into other qualifications. There may be exceptional circumstances where even this flexibility does not meet a particular local need. In this case centres can seek permission from Edexcel to develop a unit with us to meet this need. The cases where this will be allowable will be very limited. Centres will need strong evidence of the local need and the reasons why the existing standard units are inappropriate. Edexcel will need to submit these units for accreditation by QCA.

Limitations on variations from standard specifications
The flexibility to import standard units from other BTEC First Diploma specifications and/or develop unique units is limited to one unit in a BTEC First Diploma qualification. This flexibility is not available within the BTEC First Certificate. The use of these units cannot be at the expense of the core units in any qualification. More detailed guidance on delivery and assessment is given in each unit.

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Access and recruitment
Edexcel’s policy regarding access to its qualifications is that: • the qualifications should be available to everyone who is capable of reaching the required standards • the qualifications should be free from any barriers that restrict access and progression • there should be equal opportunities for all wishing to access the qualifications. Centres are required to recruit learners to BTEC qualifications with integrity. This will include ensuring that applicants have appropriate information and advice about the qualifications and that the qualification will meet their needs. Centres should take appropriate steps to assess each applicant’s potential and make a professional judgement about their ability to successfully complete the programme of study and achieve the qualification. This assessment will need to take account of the support available to the learner within the centre during their programme of study and any specific support that might be necessary to allow the learner to access the assessment for the qualification. Centres should also show regard for Edexcel’s policy on learners with particular requirements. Centres will need to review the profile of qualifications and/or experience held by applicants, considering whether this profile shows an ability to progress to a Level 2 qualification. For learners who have recently been in education, the profile is likely to include one of the following: • a standard of literacy and numeracy supported by a general education equivalent to four GCSEs at grades D–G • • related work experience other related Level 1 or 2 qualifications.

More mature learners may present a more varied profile of achievement that is likely to include experience of paid and/or unpaid employment.

Restrictions on learner entry
The Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate in Sport and the Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Diplomas in Sport are accredited on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF). The qualifications are listed on the DfES funding lists Section 96 and Section 97. Additionally, the majority of BTEC First qualifications are available to learners aged 14–16 to enhance their curriculum and to help them gain experience of vocational skills which will prepare them for work.

Access arrangements and special considerations
Edexcel’s policy on access arrangements and special considerations for BTEC and Edexcel NVQ qualifications aims to enhance access to the qualifications for learners with disabilities and other difficulties (as defined by the 1995 Disability Discrimination Act and the amendments to the Act) without compromising the assessment of skills, knowledge, understanding or competence. Further details are given in the policy ‘Access Arrangements and Special Considerations for BTEC and Edexcel NVQ Qualifications’, which is on the Edexcel website (www.edexcel.org.uk). This policy replaces the previous Edexcel policy (Assessment of Vocationally Related Qualification: Regulations and Guidance Relating to Learners with Special Requirements, 2002) concerning learners with particular requirements.

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The Edexcel BTEC Qualification Framework for the Active Leisure and Learning sector

Progression opportunities within the framework are available vertically, diagonally and horizontally.

NQF Level BTEC Full VRQ Courses BTEC Short Courses BTEC Higher National Certificates and Diplomas in Sport and Leisure Management and Sport and Exercise Sciences BTEC Certificate in Training for Improved Sports Performance

General Qualifications

NVQ/Occupational

5

4

AVCE Leisure and Recreation

3

Advanced Subsidiary GCEs Physical Education and Leisure Studies

Advanced GCEs Physical Education and Leisure Studies First Certificate and Diplomas in Sport

BTEC National Awards/Certificates/Diplomas in Sport (Performance and Excellence), Sport (Sports Development and Fitness), Sport (Outdoor Education) and Sport and Exercise Sciences

NVQs in Operations and Development, Outdoor Education, Development Training, Recreation and Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance

2

GCSE Physical Education (full and short course)

BTEC Certificate in Sport and Leisure

NVQs in Coaching, Teaching and Instructing, Activity Leadership, Operational Services and Instructing Exercise and Fitness NVQ in Sport, Recreation and Allied Occupations

1

Edexcel Level 1 BTEC Introductory Certificate and Diploma in Sport and Leisure Entry Skills for Working Life — Sport and Recreation

Entry

Entry Level Certificate in Physical Education

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Further information
For further information please call Customer Services on 0870 240 9800 (calls may be recorded for training purposes) or visit our website at www.edexcel.org.uk.

Useful publications
Further copies of this document and related publications can be obtained from: Edexcel Publications Adamsway Mansfield Nottinghamshire NG18 4FN Telephone: 01623 467 467 Fax: 01623 450 481 Email: publications@linneydirect.com Related information and publications include: • Accreditation of Prior Learning available on our website: www.edexcel.org.uk • Guidance for Centres Offering Edexcel/BTEC NQF Accredited Programmes — (Edexcel, distributed to centres annually) • key skills publications — specifications, tutor support materials and question papers • The Statutory Regulation of External Qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland — (QCA, 2004) • the current Edexcel publications catalogue and update catalogue. Edexcel publications concerning the Quality Assurance System and the internal and external verification of vocationally related programmes may be found on the Edexcel website and in the Edexcel publications catalogue. NB: Most of our publications are priced. There is also a charge for postage and packing. Please check the cost when you order.

How to obtain National Occupational Standards
SkillsActive Castlewood House 77–91 New Oxford Street London WC1A 1PX Telephone: Fax: Email: Website: +44 (0)20 7632 2000 +44 (0)20 7632 2001 skills@skillsactive.com www.skillsactive.com

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Professional development and training
Edexcel supports UK and international customers with training related to BTEC qualifications. This support is available through a choice of training options offered in our published training directory or through customised training at your centre. The support we offer focuses on a range of issues including: • • • • • • • planning for the delivery of a new programme planning for assessment and grading developing effective assignments building your team and teamwork skills developing student-centred learning and teaching approaches building key skills into your programme building in effective and efficient quality assurance systems.

The national programme of training we offer can be viewed on the Edexcel website (www.edexcel.org.uk). You can request customised training through the website or by contacting one of our advisers in the Professional Development and Training team via Customer Services on telephone 0870 240 9800 (calls may be recorded for training purposes) to discuss your training needs. The training we provide: • • • is active — ideas are developed and applied is designed to be supportive and thought provoking builds on best practice.

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Annexe A
QCA codes
The QCA National Qualifications Framework (NQF) code is known as a Qualification Accreditation Number (QAN). This is the code that features in the DfES Funding Schedules — Section 96 and Section 97 and is to be used for all qualification funding purposes. Each unit within a qualification will also have a QCA NQF unit code. The QCA qualification and unit codes will appear on the learner’s final certification documentation. The QANs for qualifications in this publication are: 100/5706/7 100/5707/9 Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate in Sport Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Diplomas in Sport.

These qualification titles will appear on the learners’ certificates. Learners need to be made aware of this when they are recruited by the centre and registered with Edexcel. Providing this happens, centres are able to describe the programme of study leading to the award of the qualification in different ways to suit the medium and the target audience.

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Annexe B
Indicative characteristics — distinction • • Evaluate concepts/ideas/actions. Analyse/research and make recommendations. Judges implications of application of knowledge/ understanding. Applies knowledge and understanding to complex activities/contexts. • • • Synthesise knowledge and understanding across p/m criteria.

Grading domains

Grading domain 1

Indicative characteristics — merit

Application of knowledge and understanding



Show depth of knowledge and development of understanding in given situations (eg explain why, make judgements based on analysis).



Apply and/or select relevant concepts.



Apply knowledge to different contexts.



Apply knowledge to non-routine contexts (ie assessor selection).



Make comparisons. Indicative characteristics — distinction • • • • • • • Demonstrate creativity/originality/own ideas. Apply skill(s) to achieve higher order outcome. Select and use successfully from a range of advanced techniques/processes/skills. Reflects on skill acquisition and application. Justifies application of skills/methods. Makes judgements about risks and limitations of techniques/processes. Innovates or generates of application of techniques/processes for new situations.



Show relationships between p criteria.

Grading domain 2

Indicative characteristics — merit

Development of practical and technical skills



Use advanced techniques/processes/skills successfully.



Act under limited supervision/demonstrate independence (note: pass cannot require support).



Apply to non-routine activities.



Demonstrate within time and/or resource constraints.



Produce varied solutions (including non-routine).



Modify techniques/processes to situations.

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Grading domain 3 • Manages self to achieve outcomes successfully. Plans for own learning and development through the activities. • • • Applies initiative appropriately. • • • • • • • • •

Indicative characteristics — merit

Indicative characteristics — distinction

Personal development for occupational roles



Takes responsibility in planning and undertaking activities.



Reviews own development needs.



Finds and uses relevant information sources.



Acts within a given work-related context showing understanding of responsibilities.

Analyses and manipulates information to draw conclusions. Assesses how different work-related contexts or constraints would change performance. Takes decisions related to work contexts. Applies divergent and lateral thinking in work-related contexts. Understands interdependence. Presents self and communicates information to meet the needs of a typical audience. Takes decisions in contexts with justifications. Produces outputs subject to time/resource constraints. Reflects on own contribution to working within a team. Generate new or alternative solutions to specified problems.



Identifies responsibilities of employers to the community and the environment.



Applies qualities related to the vocational sector.



Internalises skills/attributes (creating confidence).

Grading domain 4

Indicative characteristics — merit

Indicative characteristics — distinction

Application of generic and key skills



Communicates using appropriate technical/professional language.



Makes judgements in contexts with explanations.



Explains how to contribute within a team.



Makes adjustments to meet the needs/expectations of others (negotiation skills).



Select and justify solutions for specified problems.

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Annexe C
Key skills
All BTEC First qualifications include mapping and/or signposting of key skills. These are transferable skills, which play an essential role in developing personal effectiveness for adult and working life and in the application of specific vocational skills. In each unit the opportunities for the generation of evidence for key skills are signposted. These are indicative links only. Tutors will need to become familiar with key skills specifications and their evidence requirements and they are advised not to rely on the signposting in the units when presenting key skills evidence for moderation. Centres should refer to the QCA website (www.qca.org.uk) for the latest key skills standards. Key skills provide a foundation for continual learning. They enable and empower individuals who inevitably face a series of choices in work, education and training throughout their lives. Current and future initiatives such as learndirect, lifelong learning and widening participation all require a more flexible population in the workplace and key skills play a role in setting the framework. Learners need the chance to show current and future employers that they can: • communicate effectively, in a variety of situations, using a wide range of techniques • work well with others — individuals or teams — so that work can be properly planned and targets met • manage their own development, so that they are always ready to take on the challenges of change and diversification • use number, not just within routine tasks and functions but to help them be more effective and efficient in all they do • use ICT in a range of applications to support all aspects of their role • solve problems in a variety of circumstances.

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Key skills mapping — summary of opportunities suggested in each unit

Unit 10

Unit 11

Unit 12

Unit 13

Unit 14

Unit 15

Unit 16             

Key skills N2.1 N2.2 N2.3 C2.1a C2.1b C2.2 C2.3 ICT2.1 ICT2.2 ICT2.3 LP2.1 LP2.2 LP2.3 PS2.1 PS2.2 PS2.3 WO2.1 WO2.2 WO2.3

  

  

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

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Unit 1

Unit 2

Unit 3

Unit 4

Unit 5

Unit 6

Unit 7

Unit 8

Unit 9

Annexe D

National Occupational Standards/mapping with NVQs

The following grid maps the knowledge covered in the Edexcel Level 2 BTEC First Certificate and BTEC First Diplomas in Sport against the underpinning knowledge of the Level 2 NVQ in Sport, Recreation and Allied Occupations, Level 2 NVQ in Activity Leadership, Level 2 NVQ in Coaching, Teaching and Instructing, Level 2 NVQ in Operational Services and Level 3 NVQ in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance.

KEY  indicates that the unit from the Edexcel Level 2 BTEC Firsts in Sport has partial coverage of the underpinning knowledge of the NVQ unit a blank space indicates no coverage of the underpinning knowledge

Unit 1

Unit 2

Unit 3

Unit 4

Unit 5

Unit 6

Unit 7

Unit 8

Unit 9

Unit 10

Unit 11

Unit 12

Unit 13

Unit 14

Unit 15

Unit 16        

Edexcel Level 1 NVQ in Sport, Recreation and Allied Occupations       

Edexcel Level 2 NVQ in Activity Leadership

Edexcel Level 2 NVQ in Coaching, Teaching and Instructing

Edexcel Level 2 NVQ in Instructing Exercise and Fitness

Edexcel Level 2 NVQ in Operational Services   

Edexcel Level 3 NVQ in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance.

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Units

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Annexe E
Wider curriculum mapping
Study of the Edexcel Level 2 BTEC Firsts in Sport provides opportunities for the learner to develop an understanding of spiritual, moral, ethical, social and cultural issues as well as an awareness of environmental issues, European developments, health and safety considerations and equal opportunities issues. The Edexcel Level 2 BTEC Firsts in Sport make a positive contribution to wider curricular areas as appropriate.

Spiritual, moral, ethical, social and cultural issues
The specification contributes to an understanding of: • spiritual issues — through an appreciation of the spiritual dimension to sport, particularly when sport is seen through a historical context, for example in Unit 3: The Sports Industry • moral and ethical issues — encountered throughout the BTEC Firsts in Sport as dealing with people will always involve the learner engaging in moral and ethical issues. A more detailed analysis is contained in certain units such as Unit 14: Instructing Exercise and Fitness and Unit 5: Planning and Leading Sports Activities • social and cultural issues — are encountered throughout the BTEC Firsts in Sport particularly in Unit 3: The Sports Industry and Unit 12: The Athletes Lifestyle.

Environmental issues
Learners are led to appreciate the importance of environmental issues as they engage in sport and outdoor activities, especially in Unit 7: Practical Outdoor and Adventurous activities.

European developments
Much of the content of the Edexcel Level 2 BTEC Firsts in Sport applies throughout Europe even though the delivery is in a UK context. The European dimensions of sport are specifically addressed in Unit 3: The Sports Industry.

Health and safety considerations
The Edexcel Level 2 BTEC Firsts in Sport are practically based and so health and safety issues are encountered throughout the units. Learners will develop awareness of the safety of others as well as themselves in all practical activities. Learners will also explore health and safety issues across the sports industry, particularly in particularly in Unit 2: Health, Safety and Injury.

Equal opportunities issues
Equal opportunities issues are implicit throughout the Edexcel Level 2 BTEC Firsts in Sport.

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Wider curriculum mapping

Unit 1

Unit 2

Unit 3

Unit 4

Unit 5

Unit 6

Unit 7

Unit 8

Unit 9

Unit 10

Unit 11

Unit 12

Unit 13

Unit 14

Unit 15

Unit 16       

Spiritual                                                 

  

Moral and ethical

Social and cultural

Environmental issues

European developments

Health and safety considerations



 

Equal opportunities issues

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Further copies of this publication are available from Edexcel Publications, Adamsway, Mansfield, Notts, NG18 4FN Telephone 01623 467467 Fax 01623 450481 Email: publications@linneydirect.com Publications Code BF017349 March 2007 For more information on Edexcel and BTEC qualifications please contact Customer Services on 0870 240 9800 or http://enquiries.edexcel.org.uk or visit our website: www.edexcel.org.uk BTEC is a registered trademark of Edexcel Limited Edexcel Limited. Registered in England and Wales No. 4496750 Registered Office: One90 High Holborn, London WC1V 7BH

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