Premium Essay

Nonsense, Play and Folklore in Alice in Wonderland

In: English and Literature

Submitted By atomic
Words 6025
Pages 25
Russian – Armenian (Slavonic) University

Institute of Humanities

Department of Theory of Language and Cross-Cultural Communication

Term Paper

Title: Nonsense, Play and Folklore in Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll

Student: Voskanyan Evgenia

Supervisor:

Yerevan 2015
Contents

* Introduction: Lewis Carroll ………………………………………...………..….….3

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland * Folklore ………………………………………………………………….....….…….5 * Game of Nonsense …………………………………………………….…....……..7 * Wordplay and Quibble …………………………………………………..………..10 * Psychological interpretations of Alice in Wonderland …………………………13

Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There * Folklore …………………………………………………………………..………...15 * Contrariwise! ................................................................................................16 * Philosophical viewpoints in Through the Looking-Glass .……...…….……….19 * Conclusion: On the other side of the chessboard …………………………......21 * References .………………….………………………………………………...…..22

Lewis Carroll
Come with us now on a journey to Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass, the fairytales created by legendary Lewis Carroll. Being little known under the birth name Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, Lewis Carroll was a famous English writer and one of the founders of literary nonsense. Born in the Victorian Era to a family of a parson, he was raised according to the moral values of those times and expected to become a deacon. Nevertheless, young Lewis Carroll was always interested in theater and art since his childhood. He himself was making little puppet theaters with multiple characters and decorations, he loved comedies and street theater, yet tragedies were the most preferred. After graduating from Christ Church University, Charles Dodgson became a professor there which…...

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