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Nsa Surveillance

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Submitted By srtwolverine
Words 1025
Pages 5
Sharath Thomas
Professor Hugetz
ENGL 1301.08
05 April 2016
NSA Surveillance - Constitutional or Unconstitutional The US Constitution came to life 230 years ago, but recent actions of the National Security Agency is interpreted to be defying the Bill of Rights by the government and depriving the citizens their constitutional right to privacy. However, when posed with the question: Do people want to live in a surveillanced environment like animals in a zoo, with justice and safety ensured but privacy denied completely ? , the answers vary in the community. The revelation of the National Security Agency's massive surveillance of American citizens has prompted a debate about the constitutionality of the agency's actions. The policies of the the National Security Agency is said to be conflicting with the basic right of privacy guaranteed to citizens in the Fourth Amendment. The "metadata" collection carried out by the National Security Agency, including all kinds of personal records and assets along with a list of phone calls and electronic messages poses a challenge to the Fourth Amendment of the Bill of Rights. Eavesdropping on people is a loaded feature of NSA: " It specializes in pretty much one thing, and that's eavesdropping on communications around the world, whether it's e-mail, cell phones, regular telephones--any kind of communications--and also in breaking codes" (Michele par. 4). The onset of the technological era led to digital network holding the upper hand on global communications network; this demand for a powerful and global presence in the communications network for mass protection of the citizens was met by the NSA. The government and NSA debates about rethinking their policies and authorities. The Fourth Amendment of the...

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