O Compare and Contrast the Psychoanalytic Theories of Freud, Jung, and Adler

In: Psychology

Submitted By elgrandepesca
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Freud’s views contributed so much to psychology as we know it today. Still it continues to influence contemporary psychology. This approach really caught my attention as I could relate so much to his concepts during my voluntary work. I worked along with a pastoral counsellor working mainly with a basic style of “what you put in is what you get out.” What I mean is, is that just like Freud’s concepts that focuses on early childhood experiences and the unconscious mind, we really went deep into the past of a client to find out where all the trauma began. What better way to understand the life world of someone and why they do what they do and experience what they experience?
Freud is also recognized for identifying certain psychosexual stages of life. In short the stages are described as follows:

Oral Stage: During the 1st year of your life you find yourself in the Oral Stage, sucking at a mother’s breast satisfies feelings of hunger and is pleasurable. Deprivation of this stage could result in feelings of rejections, mistrust of others or problems to form intimate relationships.
Anal Stage: From ages 1-3 you find yourself in the Anal Stage, this stage pays attention to the formation of the personality, learning independence and learning to express negative feelings.
Phallic Stage: During ages 3-6 we find ourselves in the Phallic Stage, this stage focuses in an unconscious desire for the parent of the opposite sex, but is repressed. This is known as Oedipus complex for boys and Electra complex for girls. During this stage the parent’s responses determine the sexual attitudes and feelings that the child develops.
Latency Stage: From ages 6-12 you enter into the Latency Stage. The child’s interests are moved away from sexual impulses and are focused on sports, school, friend etc. This is a time of socialisation.
Genital Stage: During ages 12-18 you enter…...

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