Observation Child Development Level 2

In: Social Issues

Submitted By 1997
Words 878
Pages 4
Supervision
children need to be supervised at all times, even more so when they are very young. This because they are still vulnerable to, and do not fully understand some dangers such as electrical appliances, knives or blades (usually found in the kitchen). Because of this, the child may hurt themselves, for example touching electrical plugs, or cutting themselves with a knife.
A child may also be vulnerable to other dangers such as bacteria, and other germs, which a child can come into contact with anywhere when not supervised.
Toddlers are usually more likely to hurt themselves as they move around and explore a lot more than newborn babies. Older children are also less likely to hurt themselves as they usually have more common sense and understanding of the dangers around them.
Because of this, toddlers need to be supervised very carefully, and you need to make sure that they explore dangerous things, as they like to put objects in their mouth and sometimes ingest objects, or simply play with objects which can cause harm.
Babies still need supervision, as they are helpless and cannot tell you if they feel unwell ect.
Older children are also very adventurous, they may need less supervision, but they do still need to be supervised as they can also harm themselves by accident.
Adult to child ratio
this is important for nursery’s/schools to follow as this prevents children from being hurt.
Children under 2 years – 1 adult to 3 children
children between 2 years and three years – 1 adult to 4 children
children between 3 years to 8 years - 1 adult to 8 children.



Safety precautions.
Safety is very important, and is a main priority at little stars. We fill out forms to check the nursery is up to standard three times a day, and any faults are reported. We also keep rules in place, to ensure safety. For example, no more than three children in the kitchen…...

Similar Documents

Child Observation

...Zenith- a highest point or state; culmination. The water was at its zenith of boiling. 1. Allegory- a representation of an abstract or spiritual meaning through concrete or material forms; figurative treatment of one subject under the guise of another. The book was allegory; it had weird writings on it that meant something. 2. Colloquial- characteristic of or appropriate to ordinary or familiar conversation rather than formal speech or writing; informal. They had a family nice colloquial at the dinner table. 3. Sundry- various or diverse. They were a sundry group of family. 4. Shire- The counties in the Midlands in which hunting is especially popular. The land was shire; it had many deers to hunt. 5. Burnish- To make smooth and bright. He waxed the table to burnish it. 6. Solicitous- anxious or concerned. He was very solicitous to get out of class. 7. Prelate- an ecclesiastic of a high order, as an archbishop, bishop, etc.; a church dignitary. He was prelate, and had lots of power. 8. Palpitation- an unusually or abnormally rapid or violent beating of the heart. After running the mile his heart was palpitating 9. Dalliant- A casual romantic or sexual relationship. They had a dalliant relationship. 10. Assize- a trial session, civil or criminal, held periodically in specific locations in England, usually by a judge of a superior court. He had an assize and was being prosecuted. 11. Sanguine- cheerfully optimistic, hopeful, or...

Words: 636 - Pages: 3

Child Observation Report

...Child Observation Report Lecturer: Dr. Stephanie L. Knight Observer: Afra Mohamed Taha Observant: 3-4 year old boy Topic: Entire Observation Setting: Airport. A family consists of a father, a mother, three daughters and a son. Goal: Observing the boy to see his entire behavior, in addition to his reaction to reinforcement and punishment. Time: 52 minutes Method used: Systematic Observation (Specimen Record and Event Sampling) Data collection: This report is based on a “Systematic Observation” (Berk, 2003, p.44). I designed a simple form to record the data based on specimen record and event sampling in which the researcher records a description of the particular entire steam of behavior, in addition to all instances of particular behavior during a specified time period. (Berk, 2003, p.44-45) Analysis and Discussion: According to Piaget Cognitive Development Theory (Berk, 2003, p.133), this child is in the preoperational stage (2-7 years), and he behaves normally. When the father left he was upset. His mother asked him to sit still in one of the chairs. He was lying in an arm chair, moving his legs up and down. Then he put his feet on the armrest of the chair next to him, where his sister was sitting. He repeated this behavior several times in attempt to hit his sister. That made his mother tell him off. However, he still didn't respond. Then he put...

Words: 1126 - Pages: 5

Child Observation

...\ Dyslexia Basic Dyslexia is a language learning disability. The earliest clues mostly spoke language. The very first clue to a language and reading problem may be delayed language. Once the child being to speak there’s different ways to see if the child has learning problems and difficulties with rhyming, phonemic awareness and ability to read common one syllable words. The cause of dyslexia it’s not clear but anatomical and brain and studies show differences in the dyslexic person functions. It has found that people with dyslexia has more problems with identifying the separate speech sound within a word. Studies indicate that almost half of the students with special education are classified as having learning disability. Dyslexia can occurs in all backgrounds and intellectual levels. Parents with dyslexia are most likely to have children whit dyslexia. People with dyslexia can also have problems with spoken language even after they have been exposed to good language models. They may find it difficult to express them clearly, or to fully comprehend what others mean when they speak. Kids with dyslexia think that they are dumb and they don’t have the capacity to learn like the others kids, but they have the same capacity to do things maybe not the same thing but a different thing they are perfect. Today in day school has a new program called Response to Intervention to identity if children with learning problems. When teaches see that the kid its not learning like...

Words: 452 - Pages: 2

Child Observation Paper

... birth, their hearing is similar to an adults. Babies learn by listening to sounds and voices. They learn to connect the sounds they hear with the people, animals, objects, and actions that made them. This is how they are able to make sense of the world around them. As babies grow and develop, they’ll use their hearing to communicate and interact with others. The ability to hear is an important sense to development normal speech and language skills. Hearing can be encouraged by having different ways of holding and talking to your baby. Some babies need energetic conversation, some need gentle tones. Another way to encourage hearing is by talking and reading often. This will allow babies sense of hearing and cognitive abilities to develop together. It’s important to know what to expect as your baby develops because hearing problems can delay the development of voice, speech, and language skills. To recognize developmental delays you can keep track of your babies development by age appropriate checklist that can be addressed by a doctor if not accomplished at their age level. Hearing checklist for ages birth to 6 months: Child should react to loud sounds, Calm down or smile when spoken to, Recognize your voice and calm down if crying, When feeding starts or stop sucking in response to sound, Coos and makes pleasure sounds, Has a special way for crying for different things. 4 to 6 months follow sound with his or her eyes, Respond to changes in the tone of your voice, Notice......

Words: 1586 - Pages: 7

Child Observation

... falling. Becky also followed up with having peer relations with her sister. “Mildred Parten, one of the first to study peer sociability among 2- to 5-yearolds, noticed a dramatic rise with age in joint, interactive play” (Berk 201). Becky showed “associated play, [where] children engage in separate activities but exchange toys and comment on one’s behavior” (Berk 202). It’s just that Bella does not know how to properly speak yet. Observing a child is more than just keeping an eye on them. From observing this child, I gained some knowledge on how what they do actually reflects back to what we’re learning in class... It’s best to give a child the best nutrition she could get. As a child grows older, she becomes pickier and that is not something new for me. I’ve known many children that are very picky. They also grow up to stronger. A child can remember things even if they have to think for a while. For me, I find it very interesting how the child I observed began to think symbolically and learn to use words and pictures to represent objects. While they are getting better with language and thinking, they still tend to think about things in very concrete terms. References Berk, L. E. (2011). Cognitive Development in Infancy and Toddlerhood. In J. Mosher (Ed.), Exploring Lifespan Development (2nd ed., pp. 116-139). Boston, MA.: Pearson Education, Inc. Berk, L. E. (2011). Physical and Cognitive Development in Early Childhood. In J. Mosher (Ed.), Exploring Lifespan......

Words: 1395 - Pages: 6

Child Observation

...Tyler is 21 months old and has brown, mid-length, soft and curly hair. She has almond shaped brown eyes, and a dark complexion. She is in her back yard with her 6-year-old sister. Today is a warm day with lots of sunshine. The children are dressed in shorts and tank tops. Tyler walked out of the family’s back door first and went straight to her tricycle. Her oldest sister, Dyari immediately followed her and began to help her onto the tricycle, as directed by Tyler, non verbally. Her sister, Mya, 4, went straight to the flower bed to dig with the shovel and buckets that were sitting there. Tyler has just finished a snack eaten at her kitchen table. She seems in a happy mood and ready to play. When Tyler goes into her back yard she immediately goes towards her tricycle followed by her sister. There are several toys in the back yard. There is a child size pool, two push toys, a large ball a few buckets with shovels sitting next to the flower bed and various other cars and a doll. Tyler chose the tricycle first, possibly because it was the toy nearest to the back door. Tyler and her two sisters ages 4 and 7 are present. yler at first seems to be the one controlling the play. She approaches the tricycle and is followed by her oldest sister, Dyari. Tyler directs her sister, nonverbally to help her get on the tricycle. Tyler is on the tricycle and Dyari is standing close as if she is ready to protect her is Tyler falls off. Tyler is wiggling the handle bars back and forth making...

Words: 654 - Pages: 3

Child Development Observation

...Amber Jeppesen Child 68 MW 4:45-6:10pm October 17th, 2014 Part 1—General Information The name of the center I observed at was C.L.O.U.D.S Preschool Program at Perdew Elementary School. The address of the center: 13051 Miller Ave. Etiwanda, CA 91739. The C.L.O.U.D.S Preschool Program has goals for each and every one of its students to succeed in language development, social skills and preacademic training sets. This program does include fees, each different for every student due to the fact that each student has a different learning plan. Students come at different days as well as times. Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Jarvis were the teachers in the C.L.O.U.D.S Preschool class I observed. Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Jarvis work together teaching side by sided. Mrs. Jones is in charge of the A.M. class, while Mrs. Jarvis takes charge of the P.M. class. They offer each other assistance while the other is in charge, making it very convenient for one another. Other adults that were helping out in the classroom were Instructional Aides, hired by the Etiwanda School District that Perdew Elementary School is under. There are two aides, D’Ann and Julie. Mrs. Jones let me know there is always a parent volunteer in class with the preschoolers. Of the three days I was there observing, there were three different parent volunteers. The Instructional Aides were hands on with the kids, while the parents sat back and helped out with projects the teachers needed help with. The kid I...

Words: 1433 - Pages: 6

Child Observation

...Through Younger Eyes Child Observation Paper Courtney Beck Spoon River College Through Younger Eyes Child Observation Paper On May 5th, 2009, I was blessed with my son, I will call him Timmy for this paper. He is now five and a half years old, has brown hair, hazel eyes, average weight and a little taller than his classmates. He is my only child and I am sure there are many great excuses I could use in order to explain our circumstances, but the main factor is I had him at a young age before I was ready or had any idea how raising a child can make you, break you, shake you and wake you up, especially going at it alone. I suppose many choose their children as an easy way out or a more convienient way to get an assignment done in situations such as this one, however I decided to observe my son so I can grow as a mother. It also gave me the opportunity to learn more about him on a deeper level. Of course we observe our children everyday as parents, but do we really take it all in or just do it by natural force. With that being said, now it is time to get down to it. Observing a child, we can see how a young person thinks, plays and interacts with the world around them. Observing him while playing with his toys was an easy route because it is the only activity that allowed me to watch him for a longer period of time without him noticing persay. I observed his physical attitute, his individual way of thinking along with memory skills and what his likes and dislikes were.......

Words: 326 - Pages: 2

Observation Child Development Level 2

...Supervision children need to be supervised at all times, even more so when they are very young. This because they are still vulnerable to, and do not fully understand some dangers such as electrical appliances, knives or blades (usually found in the kitchen). Because of this, the child may hurt themselves, for example touching electrical plugs, or cutting themselves with a knife. A child may also be vulnerable to other dangers such as bacteria, and other germs, which a child can come into contact with anywhere when not supervised. Toddlers are usually more likely to hurt themselves as they move around and explore a lot more than newborn babies. Older children are also less likely to hurt themselves as they usually have more common sense and understanding of the dangers around them. Because of this, toddlers need to be supervised very carefully, and you need to make sure that they explore dangerous things, as they like to put objects in their mouth and sometimes ingest objects, or simply play with objects which can cause harm. Babies still need supervision, as they are helpless and cannot tell you if they feel unwell ect. Older children are also very adventurous, they may need less supervision, but they do still need to be supervised as they can also harm themselves by accident. Adult to child ratio this is important for nursery’s/schools to follow as this prevents children from being hurt. Children under 2 years – 1 adult to 3 children children between 2 years and...

Words: 878 - Pages: 4

Child Development Observation

... object. From birth to 2 years of age an infant will develop the ability to mouth objects placed in hand or voluntarily grab and bang objects. Although infant will be able to observe objects in their environment, they are not able to understand the permanence of an object. Emotional and cognitive developments are areas that affect one another; thinking affects emotion and emotion affects cognitive development. If you really think about it everything that is taught, learned and developed rely on each other in order to have a healthy well rounded development. When a child is observing hostile behavior it is more than likely they will not have developed the proper emotional regulation. Self -help development depends on the observation from the caregivers as well as modeling positive emotional and self-regulating skills. This will help the child see how to behave under stress or emotional frustrations. Language development I really enjoyed watching the short video of the young infants watching each other react to the care giver giving them the clothes pin or at least making it available to them to see how they would respond to the object. Each child responded differently; one child is somewhat interested in what the object was but did not reach for it; another child did reach for it but did not put together that the object can be put inside another object; and the last child was very responsive and wanted to know what else could be done with the object; watching the care...

Words: 1458 - Pages: 6

Child Observation

... stimulation as they spent most of the time in a single cage. It is therefore impossible to isolate the effects of maternal deprivation from other deprivation effects. Therefore, we cannot conclude that a lack of mother love was the sole cause of their extremely disturbed behaviour. The second criticism is ethical. Monkeys are naturally sociable creatures that live in groups, and they are also intelligent animals. It is therefore highly probable that the experience of isolation was very distressing for them, as indicated by their extremely disturbed behaviour and the great fear they showed. Bowlby’s suggested that maternal deprivation would lead to irreversible psychopathy. Harlow’s study was then used to support this, suggesting that these monkeys, without the maternal love they needed, had become irreversibly damaged. However, the study did just the opposite; they found that if monkeys were released back with other monkeys that could provide peer therapy then the monkeys would recover completely. (Bailey et al, 2008) As I have demonstrated above Reference: Haralambos et al, 2000, Psychology in focus AS Level, Lancashire: causeway press limited. Brody, R and Dwyer, D, 2002, Revise Psychology for AS Level, first edition., East Sussex: Psychology press limited. Bailey et al., 2008, AQA Psychology AS., Cheltenham: Nelson Thornes limited. Davenport., G., C., 1994., An Introduction to Child Development second edition., London: Collins Educational....

Words: 1413 - Pages: 6

Child Observation Essay

... in that both of our mothers entered into emotionally unstable/unhealthy relationships during a very difficult time during childhood development. Kimeko is the second oldest of her mother’s children. However, within her household she is the oldest child, another similarity between the 2 of us. Kimeko and her siblings all have different fathers, and her younger siblings father is actually in the household. Kimeko’s biological father has had minimal contact with her throughout her childhood. I can identify also with having a different father than my siblings, and also growing up with an absent father. My father was not present for my childhood, and we really didn’t establish a relationship until my teen years. Hopefully this will not be the case in regards to Kimeko and her father’s relationship. As a result of the aforementioned issues within the family dynamic and household, my observation of Kimeko leads me to believe that while she is developmentally on schedule in some areas, there are also areas in which she is not. She clearly looks to her mother for acceptance and as a guide to her moral decision making abilities, but she also exhibits the ability to make moral decisions on her own. On the Flip side, she has a strong sense of independence, as she has had to undertake a parental role in her younger sibling’s life at times. It is also clear, that based on the relationship that her mother has chosen to be engaged in, there are times when Kimeko feels out of place within...

Words: 1668 - Pages: 7

Child Observation

...Child Observation Report Lecturer: Dr. Stephanie L. Knight Observer: Afra Mohamed Taha Observant: 3-4 year old boy Topic: Entire Observation Setting: Airport. A family consists of a father, a mother, three daughters and a son. Goal: Observing the boy to see his entire behavior, in addition to his reaction to reinforcement and punishment. Time: 52 minutes Method used: Systematic Observation (Specimen Record and Event Sampling) Data collection: This report is based on a “Systematic Observation” (Berk, 2003, p.44). I designed a simple form to record the data based on specimen record and event sampling in which the researcher records a description of the particular entire steam of behavior, in addition to all instances of particular behavior during a specified time period. (Berk, 2003, p.44-45) Analysis and Discussion: According to Piaget Cognitive Development Theory (Berk, 2003, p.133), this child is in the preoperational stage (2-7 years), and he behaves normally. When the father left he was upset. His mother asked him to sit still in one of the chairs. He was lying in an arm chair, moving his legs up and down. Then he put his feet on the armrest of the chair next to him, where his sister was sitting. He repeated this behavior several times in attempt to hit his sister. That made his mother tell him off. However, he still didn't respond. Then he put...

Words: 1126 - Pages: 5

Child Observation

... sisters could retrieve the cubes and place them back into the proper order with the rest of the cubes, JD would pick up another one and throw it, laughing and looking at them retrieve the cubes the whole time. After a few unsuccessful attempts to get JD to cooperate, the girls went back to their electronics and left JD to play by himself. It is about 4:15 and the observation has come to an end. Interpretation: Birth – 18 Months There are three domains involved in the development of children. The three are cognitive, psychosocial, and biosocial. On February 21, 2016 I observed a 15 month old child (whom I will call JD) for one hour and fifteen minutes. JD’s observed actions led me to interpret the cognitive domain based on Piaget’s stages of cognitive development. Through a series of four stages, Piaget classified the first stage as sensorimotor intelligence which was divided into six sub-stages. The sub stage that JD falls into is the fourth stage which is Piaget’s Secondary Circular Reactions. The text defines Secondary Circular Reactions as: “the second of three types of feedback loops in sensorimotor intelligence, this one involving people and objects. Infants respond to other people, to toys, and to any other objects they can touch and move”. (Berger, 2014, p. 157). This milestone was met in the cognitive domain when JD displayed the concept of object permanence. The text defines object permanence as “the realization that objects (including people) still exist when......

Words: 1313 - Pages: 6

Child Observation

...CCP715.CA01 Multicultural Counseling: Children and Adolescsents in Context First Reaction Paper by Benley Thompson 21Jerome St. Medford, Ma. The first class brought back to me one of the fears I always had but had not expected to meet so disastrously. During the first week of my internship, I was appointed to take on a case of individual counseling. The case was unique in that the client was an Asian woman from Singapore. She was here as a student but was also married to a scientist from Singapore who also here. The two were acquaintances from earlier in life, and had been allowed to marry. From reports the client was of a high social standing in Singapore. An Asian female in her early thirties, the client first reported to me that she had no ambition. She tells me this after she reveals her history of accomplishment that included a Master level education in Singapore and an enrollment at Leslie while here in Mass. She tells me that she formerly worked for the Police Department in Singapore in a high level civil capacity. She further revealed that she considered herself a professional student who viewed accomplishment as part of who...

Words: 614 - Pages: 3