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Organizational Behavioral

In: Business and Management

Submitted By mnazri
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LEARNING’S ROLE IN EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT
You often know it when you walk into a place of business. You can tell who is bored, distracted or unhappy. And you can tell who is focused, invested and engaged. Most employers prefer the latter type of employees, of course, because they tend to work harder, be more productive, provide better customer service, and are often just more fun to work with. But determining how to engage employees is a major challenge. The business literature provides few sure-fire, easy-toimplement ways of increasing employee engagement. With this challenge in mind, the American Society for Training & Development (ASTD) commissioned the Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp) to conduct a survey and develop a study on employee engagement. “Learning’s Role in Employee Engagement” was sponsored by Dale Carnegie Training. The goal was to gain an overview of engagement in today’s workplace and to find out how organizations can boost engagement levels, with a particular focus on learning’s role in the process. The final report is based on survey responses from 776 HR and learning executives and an extensive review of the workplace literature. The results were intriguing. The research team found that engagement truly is an issue of major significance to most organizations, which is probably related to the fact that the average organization has some serious engagement problems. Only about a third of the average respondent’s workforce is highly engaged, and nearly a quarter (23%) is disengaged or minimally engaged. It’s no wonder organizations are looking for ways of boosting engagement, and learning opportunities clearly fill this need. The ASTD/i4cp Learning and Engagement Study 2007 found that about two-thirds of respondents said that the quality of learning and training opportunities positively influences engagement in their organizations, and 54%...

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