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Origin of English Language

In: English and Literature

Submitted By jaytermpaper
Words 1432
Pages 6
ORIGIN OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE INTRODUCTION What is English? English is a Germanic language of the Indo- European family (a group of hundreds of related languages and dialects including most current languages of Europe, Iranian plateau and south Asia). It is the second most spoken languages in the world. A rough estimate says that there are 300 million native speakers of English and 300 million people who speak English as a second language and 100 million speak English as a foreign language. Below is a description of countries that use English as an official language and as a second language and as a foreign language. ENGLISH AS A NATIVE LANGUAGE | ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE | ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE | Australia | Pakistan | Spain | Nigeria | Malaysia | Portugal | New Zealand | Philippines | Angola | Ghana | Papua New Guinea | France | USA | United Arab Emirates | Italy | Canada | Israel | Ukraine | Guyana | Kenya | Russia | Grenada | Tanzania | Poland | Trinidad and Tobago | Botswana | Greece | England | Uganda | China | Scotland | Mexico | Japan | Ireland | India | Hungary | Wales | Brunei | Vatican City | Sierra Leone | Cameroon | Cyprus | Liberia | Samoa | Brazil | Jamaica | Qatar | Argentina | South Africa | Malawi | Colombia | St Vincent | Malta | Venezuela | St Lucia | Mauritius | Egypt | St Christopher and Nevis | Thailand | Morocco | Barbados | Indonesia | Cote D’ Ivorie | Bahamas | Puerto Rico | Togo | Antigua | South Korea | Chile | Zambia | Vanuatu | | Zimbabwe | Tonga | | Fiji | Kuwait | | Singapore | Seychelles | |

Countries that speak English as a foreign language are French speaking countries, Arabic speaking countries, Spanish speaking countries, Portuguese speaking countries, Italian speaking countries, Mandarin,...

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