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Othello and the Doll's House

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Iago, Krogstad and the Degeneration of Marital Relationships
Iago and Krogstad
Iago and Krogstad, while both being antagonists within their respective plays Othello and A Doll’s House, do not share many traits, nor resort to the same actions, or have the same ambitions. In fact, both can be considered to be total opposites with respect to characterization. This reflects the great change that literary conventions have undergone from the time of Shakespeare to Ibsen.
Nevertheless, both characters contribute greatly to the marital separations and/or disintegrations present in both plays, although at varying extents and motives. In both plays, these antagonists have succeeded in revealing underlying realities that existed deep beneath these marriages—relationships which initially stood, whether in pretense or in truth.
Iago’s Motives Iago’s motives need not be sought out within the text to be identified. They are brought about from the very first scene. Upon the story’s advance, his motives become increasingly clear, and with only one goal before him: overthrow the Moor and be general in his place: “O sir, content you.| I follow him to serve my turn upon him.| We cannot all be masters, nor all masters| Cannot be truly followed… Were I the Moor, I would not be Iago.| In following him, I follow but myself.| Heaven is my judge, not I for love and duty,| But seeming so, for my peculiar end.”

Iago saw that the quickest way to accomplish this was to attack him at his weakest point: Desdemona; a plan which saw fulfillment at the price of his own death. Foremost among Iago’s motives was his hatred for Othello. He hated the fact that he served under him, and the fact that he chose a different lieutenant in the person of Michael Cassio: “Despise me| If I do not. Three great ones of the city| (In personal suit to make me his lieutenant)|...

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