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Overpopulation Effects on Various Countries

In: Social Issues

Submitted By Raphiporn
Words 1789
Pages 8
EC1 Section 5
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Raphiporn (Mind) Chonlakhup
5580568

Population Growth’s Negative Aspects on Various Countries

Currently, the world population is reaching an estimated number of 7,094 million people or about 7 billion (Population Connection, 2013) and is growing by 145 people every minute or 2.4 every second (CIA World Factbook, 2012). The increase in world population happens usually because of the faster decline in death rate than the birth rate due to more availability of antibiotics, immunization, clean water and increased food production which improved child lives and decreases infant mortality. Too much population growth in a region, a city or a country can result as overpopulation. Overpopulation refers to a condition when the number of the population exceeds the capacity of their living habitats and the existence of their resources, it normally occurs from the unbalanced rate of birth and deaths, an increase in immigration, or an unsustainable biome and depletion of resources. Overpopulation is generally considered as a disadvantage as it may contribute to multitudinous problems such as environmental deterioration, low life qualities, good deficiency, and fatal issue such as population collapse. This essay will emphasize on the diversity of negative aspects of population growth in various countries on their environments, economy, and society. The major and largest factor related to my idea of too much population growth as a disadvantage towards most countries is its effects on the countries’ environment and natural resources. According to the Population Connection (2009), since the growth of population in 1950, 80% of the rainforest have been destroyed, more than 10,000 wildlife and plant species had extinct, greenhouse gas emission has increase continually by 400%, and more than half of the Earth surface has been used for purposes

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