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Pascal’s View on the Interpretation of Good

In: English and Literature

Submitted By mhysax
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Dr. Ferrier
ACS 1001
14 March 2012

Pascal’s View on the Interpretation of Good
Written in a series of quasi-“tweets”, Pascal, in his Pensées, comments on a plethora of topics regarding human interaction such as human vanity and folly, or the Christian religion. In “Vanity”, Pascal also comments on the variation of justice, “Love or hate alters the face of justice. How much more righteous does a lawyer, well paid in advance find the case he is pleading? (S78)” In ancient Greece, the Sophists were teachers hired to teach members of the aristocracy the art of argumentation for careers in law and politics. Plato disagreed with the Sophists in their belief that any issue could be debated from the affirmative and negative points of view. Today, this is standard practice for lawyers. Rather, Plato promoted the idea of a universal “Good” that cannot be arbitrarily defined because of what one wants or one’s political party. Pascal agrees with Plato and his theory of forms when he states, in “The Supreme Good”, “That man without faith can know neither the true good nor justice” (S181). In these two quotes, Pascal refers to a universal good, and how justice can be construed by money. This does not apply solely to politics and law, but rather to the entire human experience and all of man’s misguided decisions.
Pascal would most likely agree to the statement that the profession of attorney is an interesting and variable one. Despite the views of a particular lawyer, he or she may find him or herself advocating a side of an issue he or she personally disagrees with. For example, a lawyer may be opposed to abortion but, as a result of money, may argue for the pro-choice standpoint. Defense lawyers, such as Kris Jenner, are possible the worst offenders of this particular ethical crime. One cannot fathom that Kris Jenner—O.J. Simpson’s lawyer—and Jose Baez—Casey Anthony’s

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