Pentium Flaw

In: Computers and Technology

Submitted By ld1017
Words 356
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Unit 5 Analysis- Pentium Flaw
NT1110
February 11, 2015
Instructor Sheila Pearson

The Pentium flaw was when a segment among the Pentium CPU’s transistors performed division incorrectly. Engineers for Intel discovered the problem after the product was released in 1993 but they kept it hush hush and decided to fix the problem by using updates to the chip. A mathematician by the name of Thomas Nicely that worked for Lynchburg College in West Virginia also discovered the flaw. At first Grove, who was the CEO of Intel at the time, did not want to recall the product but when IBM got involved and made the announcement that they would not sell any computers that used that CPU chip, it forced Intel to do a recall that cost them about $475 million.
In the beginning by keeping it quiet they were doing the wrong thing by trying to deceive the customer. By doing that they could have lost a lot of business from customers who might have felt that they were not trustworthy and were knowingly selling faulty products. But in the end they did the right thing and recalled the chips with the flaws in it which is the right thing to do. They decided to replace all flawed processors upon request and put aside a 420 million dollar budget to do so. They also hired hundreds of employees to specifically deal with customer requests. They placed four fulltime employees to read Internet newsgroups and respond to any and every question or remark about Intel’s products.
If this same flaw was to happen today I think it could be easily fixed through updates to the computer instead of having to recall every chip like last time. It will probably be done so quick that no one will have time to figure out there was a flaw to begin with.



References:
Emery, V. (n.d). The Pentium Chip Story: A Learning Experience by Vince Emery. Retrieved from http://www.emery.com/1e/pentium.htm
Hall, M.…...

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