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Person Centred Approach

In: Social Issues

Submitted By nicki69
Words 403
Pages 2
Forging relationships

We all can probably recount our personal experiences of receiving some form of nursing care. This might have been as a patient in hospital, in a community or doctor’s clinic or in some other kind of health service provision. The personal relationships we formed with the nurses responsible for our care will have been important to us. For all patients, and their families, the relationships forged with nurses and other carers are central to the quality of their healthcare experience. The quality of these relationships is singled out in patient satisfaction surveys as being of particular importance. To engage successfully with their patients, nurses need to listen carefully, and to get to know their patients as people. Getting to know the person behind the patient is the raison d'être of person-centred nursing care.

So what is person-centred nursing?

A person-centred approach to nursing focuses on the individual’s personal needs, wants, desires and goals so that they become central to the care and nursing process. This can mean putting the person’s needs, as they define them, above those identified as priorities by healthcare professionals. In the words of Bob Price, a nurse academic writing for the Nursing Standard in 2006, ‘the term person-centred care is used…to indicate a strong interest in the patient’s own experience of health, illness, injury or need. It infers that the nurse works with the person’s definition of the situation, as well as that presented through a medical or other diagnosis’.

There are a number of different frameworks that have been developed by nurse academics to help practising nurses implement person-centred care. While these frameworks are all slightly different, they all share some key components:

# knowing the patient as an individual
# being responsive
# providing care that is meaningful
# respecting...

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