Philosophical and Theoretical Model for Nursing Administration

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Philosophical and Theoretical Model for Nursing Administration Practice

Philosophical and Theoretical Model for Nursing Administration Practice
In an era of chaotic and unpredictable health care, I believe it is vital for nursing to employ a nursing leadership theory or philosophy that is specifically applicable to nurses and will holistically address and support both the science and art of this honored profession. According to Parker (2006) “A philosophy comprises statements of enduring values and beliefs held by the members of the discipline”(p.6). As nurses we use philosophical statements to explore compatibility among personal, professional, organizational and societal beliefs and values. I have learned that values are deeply held beliefs about what is good, right, and appropriate. Values are deep seated and remain constant over time. We accumulate our values from childhood based on teaching and observation of our parents, teachers, religious leaders, and other influential and powerful people. Our values and beliefs guide our actions and control our behavior. Values and beliefs are a key component to an individual as one's value system guides one through life personally and professionally.
As a nurse leader, I consider it is extremely important to have a nursing philosophy that guides the thinking about, being, and doing of nursing (Parker, 2006). As a leader I believe it is important to have a foundation that addresses the phenomena of interest to nursing. It is vital to have the structure and substance to ground the practice and scholarship of nursing. Theories not only provide structure for developing, evaluating and using nursing scholarship, but they also allow for extending and refining nursing knowledge through research (Parker, 2006). As nurse leader one of my goals is to encourage research and evidence based practice. Fawcett et all 2001…...

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